McAulay, Elizabeth | 1 May 01:55 2012

David Livingstone 1871 Diary, published in TEI P5

The David Livingstone Spectral Imaging Project is delighted to announce the first edition publication of
two digital resources:

1. Livingstone's 1871 Field Diary: A Multispectral Critical Edition (http://livingstone.library.ucla.edu/1871diary/)

2. The Livingstone Spectral Image Archive (http://livingstone.library.ucla.edu/livingstone_archive/)


These resources are primary documents created by David Livingstone, the celebrated Victorian
abolitionist, missionary, and explorer of Africa. The primary documents published online are of
significant contributions to Digital Humanities and Digital Library endeavors, and also are of
interest to scholars of Victorian literature, postcolonial studies, and African history. 

The beta publication of these resources last fall drew worldwide interest, with full-length articles
appearing in The New York Times, The Washington Post, BBC News, and many other outlets. The UCLA Digital
Library Program now presents these two resources in revised and expanded versions with enhanced
functionality. Collectively the resources make the text of Livingstone's previously illegible diary
available for the first time in 140 years. The resources also bring together the 1871 Field Diary with a
variety of related manuscripts for the first time since the nineteenth century. Nearly all materials are
published and licensed for use under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License.

Livingstone's 1871 Field Diary: A Multispectral Critical Edition
(http://livingstone.library.ucla.edu/1871diary/) reveals for the first time the words of a unique
diary kept by Livingstone in the months prior to his famous meeting with Henry Morton Stanley. The diary
also records Livingstone's uncensored, first-hand impressions of a horrific slave trading massacre in
the Congo. Thanks to a letter from Livingstone, the massacre would become an iconic rallying point for
late-Victorian abolitionists and help spur the British-enforced closure of the notorious Zanzibar
slave market. Livingstone composed the diary crosswise over old newspaper pages with ink from the seeds
of a local African plant - an expedient that has not stood the test of time. Today large portions of the text
are illegible and nearly invisible to the naked eye. However, the David Livingstone Spectral Imaging
Project (http://livingstone.library.ucla.edu/) has succeeded in restoring the full text of the diary
by using advanced imaging technology and digital scholarship to produce a comprehensive critical
(Continue reading)

John P. McCaskey | 1 May 05:13 2012

Re: Whether an attribute's value is one or many

>> In<element>  it seems  <at> undo must be ordered.
>>
>> The example for textDesc includes  <at> n = "Informal domestic conversation" -- surely ordered.
> quite. there are anomalies and abuses.  <at> n must be Number One Abused Attribute in the TEI.
>
> Sebastian
The page specifying att.dimensions says the Datatype of  <at> extent is any 
number of occurrences of data.word and the Value is "any measurement 
*phrase*, e.g. 25 letters, 2 x 3 inches." Other examples on that spec 
page are "5 words" and "half the page."

-- JPM

Lou Burnard | 1 May 10:28 2012
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Re: Whether an attribute's value is one or many

On 01/05/12 04:13, John P. McCaskey wrote:
>>> In<element> it seems  <at> undo must be ordered.
>>>
>>> The example for textDesc includes  <at> n = "Informal domestic
>>> conversation" -- surely ordered.
>> quite. there are anomalies and abuses.  <at> n must be Number One Abused
>> Attribute in the TEI.
>>
>> Sebastian
> The page specifying att.dimensions says the Datatype of  <at> extent is any
> number of occurrences of data.word and the Value is "any measurement
> *phrase*, e.g. 25 letters, 2 x 3 inches." Other examples on that spec
> page are "5 words" and "half the page."
>
>

That's one that slipped through the net! thanks for reporting it. I see 
Sebastian has already put in a bug report to fix it.

Sebastian Rahtz | 1 May 10:29 2012
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Re: Whether an attribute's value is one or many

On 1 May 2012, at 04:13, John P. McCaskey wrote:

> The page specifying att.dimensions says the Datatype of  <at> extent is any number of occurrences of
data.word and the Value is "any measurement *phrase*, e.g. 25 letters, 2 x 3 inches." Other examples on
that spec page are "5 words" and "half the page."

golly. you  have spotted a rare example of Old Skool TEI surviving in the wild. That's just mad, in my view.
I have put in a bug report at https://sourceforge.net/tracker/?func=detail&aid=3522713&group_id=106328&atid=644062
if anyone would care to comment.

--
Stormageddon Rahtz      
Head of Information and Support Group
Oxford University Computing Services
13 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6NN. Phone +44 1865 283431

Sólo le pido a Dios
que el futuro no me sea indiferente

Marco BÜCHLER | 1 May 10:31 2012
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The 2012 Leipzig eHumanities Seminar - Call for Abstracts

Apologize for cross postings!


The
Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (16:30 - 19:00) from October to November at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in a printed volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by June, 15th, 2012 to seminar <at> e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of July.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar <at> e-humanities.net.


Seminar board (in alphabetical order):
Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing),
Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing,
Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation),
Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).
Marco BÜCHLER | 1 May 11:01 2012
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2012 eHumanities Innovation Award - Call for Proposal Abstracts

Apologize for cross postings!

The
eHumanities Innovation Award recognizes emerging researchers who have developed new automated methods for the analysis of Humanities content. We particularly look for research that involves a deep understanding of issues from both the Humanities and from the Information Sciences. Individual researchers may thus be primarily centered in the Humanities or in the Information Sciences but we also invite work that involves collaboration across these boundaries.

Your proposal should clarify the following points:
  • How does your methodology/technique work? Explain and discuss here in detail not     only the technique you propose, but also the distinguishing features of your approach.   
  • Which benefits does your method provide for the humanities? Please explain in detail how your method is used in any field of the humanities? Do not forget to provide good examples.   
  • What are the next steps for your research process?

We are not interested in a combination of digital data with previously available tools or visualization techniques.

Who can apply?
This award focuses on researchers who have received their PhD’s within the previous 5 years or are still working on the PhD.

Procedure:
  1. Send a proposal abstract until July, 31st, 2012.
  2. After reviewing, the participants with the 5 most interesting contributions will be asked to present both data and results of their submissions (early September 2012).    
  3. Finally, the winner and two notable mentions will be announced by September 30th, 2012.

The winner will receive a 1000 Euro award and will be invited to the 2012 Leipzig eHumanities Seminar to present the contribution.

Please send an anonymized proposal of no more than 1.500 words by July, 31st, 2012 to award <at> e-humanities.net.

If you have any questions please contact us at award <at> e-humanities.net.


Award board (in alphabetical order):
Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing),
Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing,
Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation),
Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).
Conal Tuohy | 1 May 14:41 2012
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Re: zones inside zones?

On 30/04/12 19:31, James Cummings wrote:
> On 29/04/12 14:45, Conal Tuohy wrote:
>> It appears that the <zone> element has expanded in scope since
>> the time we added it to TEI P5 1.0. At that time, if I remember
>> correctly, it could not nest, and in fact had a very limited
>> content model (just <gloss>, <desc>, etc.). At that time, the
>> Council's view was that allowing nesting of <zone> elements would
>> add complexity without any additional functionality, and I
>> honestly don't know the rationale for the subsequent change.
>
> Digging around in the http://www.tei-c.org/Vault/P5/ confirms that the 
> big change for <zone> came in release 2.0.0 when we added the genetic 
> editing abilities and <sourceDoc>.  It is at this point that it gets 
>  <at> points as a separate attribute (previously in att.coordinated), 
>  <at> rotate, and its element content model changes from:
> ( model.glossLike*, model.graphicLike* )
> to:
> (text | model.graphicLike | model.global | surface | model.linePart )*
>
> This is because in its new existence in <sourceDoc> it is allowed to 
> have transcribed (but un-interpreted) text in it. Nesting <zone> 
> elements inside <sourceDoc> make more sense to me, but make much less 
> sense inside <facsimile>.
>
Thanks James! What do nested zones mean in the context of a genetic 
edition? I looked in the relevant chapter of the guidelines but I'm 
actually none the wiser: 
http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/PH.html#PH-surfzone

--

-- 
Conal Tuohy
eResearch Business Analyst
Victorian eResearch Strategic Initiative
+61-466324297

James Cummings | 1 May 19:09 2012
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Future of TEI ODD meeting at DH2012

(please redistribute to anyone interested)

Hi there,

Are you interested in the future of the Text Encoding Initiative 
meta-schema documentation language 'ODD'? Do you want to help 
design its future? Do you see better ways for it to be 
accomplishing what it does? Are you going to be at the Digital 
Humanities 2012 conference in Hamburg this summer?

On the Saturday 21 and Sunday 22 of July 2012, immediately 
following the DH2012 conference, the TEI Technical Council is 
running an open meeting on "The Future of TEI ODD". This meeting 
will discuss some of the current problems with the TEI ODD 
language which underlies the schemas created for any use of the 
TEI. It will discuss where we want this language to go in the 
future and how it might be possible to implement these changes. 
This is not a workshop or training session, but a mostly 
theoretical discussion for those with an interest in the 
underlying infrastructure of the TEI, its Guidelines, and the way 
customisations are implemented on how this should be dealt with 
in the next version of the TEI ODD language.

I've put up an almost entirely empty agenda at: 
http://wiki.tei-c.org/index.php/ODD-Dev-meetingDH2012

It is intended that the participants will help to fill out this 
agenda as the meeting approaches. That page also has a 
participants list of those who have already agreed to attend this 
meeting.

If you are interested and able to attend, then please add your 
name to the bottom of the participants list! (This will help us 
get an idea of numbers.) If you have issues that you want to make 
sure we discuss, describe them in more detail on the ODD-dev on 
the TEI wiki:
http://wiki.tei-c.org/index.php/ODD-dev

We also have a panel session during the conference on the Future 
of TEI ODD
http://www.dh2012.uni-hamburg.de/conference/programme/wednesday-july-18/
on Wednesday 18 July 11:00-12:30.  This will cover the background 
to some of the issues we will be discussing, so I recommend 
attending this if possible.

Details of the precise location for the meeting at the conference 
site will be given closer to the date.

Hope to see you there,

James Cummings
Chair of TEI Technical Council

--

-- 
Dr James Cummings, InfoDev,
Computing Services, University of Oxford

Dr. Herbert Wender | 2 May 01:39 2012
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Re: zones inside zones?

In einer eMail vom 1.5.2012 15:42:27 Westeuropäische Sommerzeit schreibt conal.tuohy <at> VERSI.EDU.AU:

What do nested zones mean in the context of a genetic
edition? I looked in the relevant chapter of the guidelines but I'm
actually none the wiser:
http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/PH.html#PH-surfzone




As an outsider I surely can't answer your question, but looking at the Whitman example at the cited location I would criticize the imprecision of your subject line: zone is not really nesting in zone but one surface (with its own zones) nests in a zone of another surface.

Analytically I had probably preferred another structure, namely to divide the leaf surface only in 2 zones: an upper one for the idea of a new poem, the lower one as the place for attaching the materials (2 additional surfaces - with stuff for the second resp. third stanza ?)

BTW another question, addressed to the transcribers of the Whitman note:

<line>Poem</line>
  <line>As in Visions of — at</line>
  <line>night —</line>
  <line>All sorts of fancies running through</line>


Is there not a certain gap just befor the first mdash? Then the noted idea for the poem was possibly intended to read:

As in Visions of [xyz] — at
  night —

Or is it a false impression, evoked by the facsimile?
[
http://www.whitmanarchive.org/resources/sleepers/duk.00258.001.jpg
]

Herbert
Conal Tuohy | 2 May 02:33 2012
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Re: zones inside zones?

On 02/05/12 09:39, Dr. Herbert Wender wrote:
In einer eMail vom 1.5.2012 15:42:27 Westeuropäische Sommerzeit schreibt conal.tuohy <at> VERSI.EDU.AU:

What do nested zones mean in the context of a genetic
edition? I looked in the relevant chapter of the guidelines but I'm
actually none the wiser:
http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/PH.html#PH-surfzone




As an outsider I surely can't answer your question, but looking at the Whitman example at the cited location I would criticize the imprecision of your subject line: zone is not really nesting in zone but one surface (with its own zones) nests in a zone of another surface.
Indeed! The Guidelines does provide an example of nesting a surface within a zone (representing a piece of paper stuck onto the page), and this nested surface itself contains a zone, which contains a transcription of that piece of paper. But I could find no examples or discussion of zones nesting directly within zones (the subject of Julia's original question), although the schema has been changed to permit this.

-- Conal Tuohy eResearch Business Analyst Victorian eResearch Strategic Initiative +61-466324297

Gmane