Tim Finney | 1 Feb 02:48 2008

Re: Whatever happened to <at> precision?

I would vote for that too.

Tim Finney

On Thu, 2008-01-31 at 08:31 -0800, Martin Holmes wrote:
> Conal Tuohy wrote:
> > <date>
> >         <date when="1640" cert="low"/>
> >         <date notBefore="1620" cert="medium"/>
> >         <date notAfter="1660" cert="high"/>
> > </date>
> 
> This seems an elegant and flexible approach to me. It allows refinements 
> like this, too:
> 
> <date>
>          <date when="1640" cert="low"/>
>          <date notBefore="1620" notAfter="1660" cert="medium"/>
> </date>
> 
> where the certainty value applies to the whole date range. I would vote 
> for this being incorporated into the guidelines as good practice.
> 
> Cheers,
> Martin
> 

John Tone Young | 1 Feb 09:58 2008
Picon

Re: Whatever happened to <at> precision?

For what it's worth, so would I.  I think this answers my intial 
question, which is what sent the thread off on this tack.

John

Quoting Tim Finney <tfinney <at> RELTECH.ORG>:

> I would vote for that too.
> 
> Tim Finney
> 
> On Thu, 2008-01-31 at 08:31 -0800, Martin Holmes wrote:
> > Conal Tuohy wrote:
> > > <date>
> > >         <date when="1640" cert="low"/>
> > >         <date notBefore="1620" cert="medium"/>
> > >         <date notAfter="1660" cert="high"/>
> > > </date>
> > 
> > This seems an elegant and flexible approach to me. It allows
> refinements 
> > like this, too:
> > 
> > <date>
> >          <date when="1640" cert="low"/>
> >          <date notBefore="1620" notAfter="1660" cert="medium"/>
> > </date>
> > 
> > where the certainty value applies to the whole date range. I would
> vote 
(Continue reading)

Felix Sasaki | 2 Feb 01:07 2008
Picon

Work on Japanese text encoding

Hi all,

I recently got in contact with Mr. Miyawaki) in Japan who is working on 
the encoding and processing (for e.g. presentation) of the Japanese text 
"Genji Monogatari". See
http://www.w3.org/QA/2007/12/xml_dev_day_tokyo_2007.html
("The World of Genji Monogatari - a new Edition")
for information (in English) on his project and links to it (the targets 
being mostly in Japanese).

Mr. Miyawaki is interested in other projects who work on Japanese text 
encoding, esp. of "Genji Monogatari". Is anybody on this list aware of 
such efforts? I'm sending this inquiry to the TEI list in the hope that 
people know about recent (if existing?) developments of the Japanese 
text encoding initiative.

Thank you,

Felix

Lou Burnard | 2 Feb 14:08 2008
Picon
Picon

Re: Work on Japanese text encoding

Felix Sasaki wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> I recently got in contact with Mr. Miyawaki) in Japan who is working on 
> the encoding and processing (for e.g. presentation) of the Japanese text 
> "Genji Monogatari". See
> http://www.w3.org/QA/2007/12/xml_dev_day_tokyo_2007.html
> ("The World of Genji Monogatari - a new Edition")
> for information (in English) on his project and links to it (the targets 
> being mostly in Japanese).
>
> Mr. Miyawaki is interested in other projects who work on Japanese text 
> encoding, esp. of "Genji Monogatari". Is anybody on this list aware of 
> such efforts? I'm sending this inquiry to the TEI list in the hope that 
> people know about recent (if existing?) developments of the Japanese 
> text encoding initiative.
>
> Thank you,
>
> Felix
>   
Hello Felix!

The Oxford Text Archive still holds a freely available TEI  SGML edition 
of the Genji Monogatari , in both Japanese and  English, which was 
prepared by the late Prof Mari Nagase, who sadly died a few years ago. 
I'd be glad to convert this to XML and make it available to  
Miyawaki-san if it would be of interest.

And thank you for the interesting report on XML developments in Japan 
(Continue reading)

Masayuki TOYOSHIMA | 3 Feb 02:55 2008
Picon

Re: the Tale of Genji (was: Work on Japanese text encoding)

> The Oxford Text Archive still holds a freely available TEI  SGML edition 
> of the Genji Monogatari , in both Japanese and  English, which was 
> prepared by the late Prof Mari Nagase

judging just from the few examples given on the www screen-shot,
Miyawaki-san's text seems to be based on the edition prepared by prof.
SHIBUYA, Yoichi.
    http://www.sainet.or.jp/~eshibuya/  (in Japanese)

National Institute of Japanese Literature (Japan) has another version,
based on different manuscripts. 
    http://base3.nijl.ac.jp/Rcgi-bin/hon_home.cgi (in Japanese)

Yet another version (based on other manuscripts) is published by
Bensei-sha. 
    http://www.bensey.co.jp/book/644.html (in Japanese)

There are still others (based on different manuscripts) circulating, but
I am not aware of www sites servicing them.

TOYOSHIMA,Masayuki / mtoyo <at> aa.tufs.ac.jp, mtoyo <at> mtoyo.jp
http://www.joao-roiz.jp/mtoyo/
Research Institute for Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa
Tokyo university of foreign studies, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo, 183-8534, JAPAN

Brett Zamir | 3 Feb 03:41 2008
Picon

<respStmt> inside of <change>?

Is there a reason <respStmt> is not allowed within <change> 
(specifically looking to put it within a <change> within a 
<revisionDesc>)? Any other way to express the <resp> portion here?

thanks,
Brett

Peter Boot | 3 Feb 12:42 2008
Picon
Picon

Re: <respStmt> inside of <change>?

Brett Zamir schreef:
> Is there a reason <respStmt> is not allowed within <change> 
> (specifically looking to put it within a <change> within a 
> <revisionDesc>)? Any other way to express the <resp> portion here?
> 
You can use the who attribute on change.

Peter

Brett Zamir | 3 Feb 12:44 2008
Picon

Re: <respStmt> inside of <change>?

Thanks, but I mean <resp> as in describing the role of the person as the 
<resp> portion of <respStmt> does.

best,
Brett

Peter Boot wrote:
> Brett Zamir schreef:
>> Is there a reason <respStmt> is not allowed within <change> 
>> (specifically looking to put it within a <change> within a 
>> <revisionDesc>)? Any other way to express the <resp> portion here?
>>
> You can use the who attribute on change.
>
> Peter
>

Lou Burnard | 3 Feb 13:02 2008
Picon
Picon

Re: <respStmt> inside of <change>?

The  <at> who attribute can point to a <respStmt> with the required <resp> 
within it.

<fileDesc>
<!--... -->
<respStmt xml:id="BZ">
<resp>copy editing</resp>
<name>Brett Zamir</name>
</respStmt>
<!-- ... -->
</fileDesc>

<revisionDesc>
<change who="#BZ" when="2008-02-02">Finished chapter 23</change>
<change who="#BZ" when="2008-01-02">Finished chapter 2</change>
</revisionDesc>

The examples in P5 don't currently demonstrate how this works very 
clearly: if I get time this morning I'll try to fix that

Brett Zamir wrote:
> Thanks, but I mean <resp> as in describing the role of the person as the 
> <resp> portion of <respStmt> does.
>
> best,
> Brett
>
> Peter Boot wrote:
>   
>> Brett Zamir schreef:
(Continue reading)

Brett Zamir | 3 Feb 13:06 2008
Picon

Re: <respStmt> inside of <change>?

Great, thanks...

Brett

Lou Burnard wrote:
> The  <at> who attribute can point to a <respStmt> with the required <resp> 
> within it.
>
> <fileDesc>
> <!--... -->
> <respStmt xml:id="BZ">
> <resp>copy editing</resp>
> <name>Brett Zamir</name>
> </respStmt>
> <!-- ... -->
> </fileDesc>
>
> <revisionDesc>
> <change who="#BZ" when="2008-02-02">Finished chapter 23</change>
> <change who="#BZ" when="2008-01-02">Finished chapter 2</change>
> </revisionDesc>
>
> The examples in P5 don't currently demonstrate how this works very 
> clearly: if I get time this morning I'll try to fix that
>
>
> Brett Zamir wrote:
>> Thanks, but I mean <resp> as in describing the role of the person as 
>> the <resp> portion of <respStmt> does.
>>
(Continue reading)


Gmane