Picon

[Daily article] June 1: Baltimore City College

The Baltimore City College is a public college-preparatory high school 
in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. The City College curriculum includes the 
International Baccalaureate Programme and emphasizes study in the 
classics and liberal arts. Baltimore City College is a magnet school, 
and admission to City College is competitive. Applicants from Baltimore 
and the surrounding area are evaluated using a combination of grades 
and standardized test scores. Established in 1839 as an all-male 
institution, City College is the third oldest public high school in the 
United States, predated by the English High School of Boston (1829) and 
the Central High School of Philadelphia (1836). The school was located 
in three different buildings in downtown Baltimore before relocating in 
1928 to its current campus at 33rd Street and The Alameda. Following an 
extensive renovation of the school's main building in 1978, the school 
became coeducational. City College is a National Blue Ribbon School of 
Excellence (1999–2000), one of only two public secondary schools in 
Baltimore City to receive the award. In the May 2007 Newsweek report on 
the top 1200 schools in the US, City College ranked 258.

Read the rest of this article:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore_City_College>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1794:

The Glorious First of June , the first and largest fleet action of the 
naval conflict between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the First 
French Republic during the French Revolutionary Wars, was fought.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glorious_First_of_June>
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] June 2: Banksia prionotes

Banksia prionotes is a species of shrub or tree of the genus Banksia in 
the Proteaceae family. It is native to the southwest of Western 
Australia and can reach up to 10 m (30 ft) in height. This species has 
serrated, dull green leaves and large, bright flower spikes, initially 
white then opening to a bright orange. The tree is a popular garden 
plant and also of importance to the cut flower industry. Banksia 
prionotes was first described in 1840 by English botanist John Lindley, 
probably from material collected by James Drummond the previous year. 
There are no recognised varieties, although it has been known to 
hybridise with Banksia hookeriana. Widely distributed in south-west 
Western Australia, B. prionotes is found from Shark Bay (25° S) in the 
north, south as far as Kojonup (33°50′S). It grows exclusively in sandy 
soils, and is usually the dominant plant in scrubland or low woodland. 
Pollinated by birds, it provides food for a wide array of vertebrate 
and invertebrate animals in the autumn and winter months. It is an 
important source of food for honeyeaters (Meliphagidae), and is 
critical to their survival in the Avon Wheatbelt region, where it is 
the only nectar-producing plant in flower at some times of the year.

Read the rest of this article:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banksia_prionotes>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1763:

Pontiac's Rebellion: The local Ojibwe captured Fort Michilimackinac in 
present-day Mackinaw City, Michigan after diverting the garrison's 
attention with a game of stickball, then chasing a ball into the fort.
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] June 3: Cyclone Gonu

Cyclone Gonu is the strongest tropical cyclone on record in the Arabian 
Sea, and is also the strongest named cyclone in the northern Indian 
Ocean. The second named tropical cyclone of the 2007 North Indian Ocean 
cyclone season, Gonu developed from a persistent area of convection in 
the eastern Arabian Sea on June 1. With a favorable upper-level 
environment and warm sea surface temperatures, it rapidly intensified 
to attain peak winds of 240 km/h (150 mph) on June 3, according to the 
India Meteorological Department. Gonu weakened after encountering dry 
air and cooler waters, and early on June 6, it made landfall on the 
eastern-most tip of Oman, becoming the strongest tropical cyclone to 
hit the Arabian Peninsula. It then turned northward into the Gulf of 
Oman, and dissipated on June 7 after making landfall in southern Iran. 
Intense tropical cyclones like Gonu are extremely rare over the Arabian 
Sea, as most storms in this area tend to be small and dissipate 
quickly. The cyclone caused 50 deaths and about $4.2 billion in damage 
(2007 USD) in Oman, where the cyclone was considered the nation's worst 
natural disaster. Gonu dropped heavy rainfall near the eastern 
coastline, reaching up to 610 mm (24 inches), which caused flooding and 
heavy damage. In Iran, the cyclone caused 28 deaths and 216 million in 
damage (2007 USD).

Read the rest of this article:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclone_Gonu>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

350:

Roman usurper Nepotianus of the Constantinian dynasty proclaimed 
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] June 4: The Beatles: Rock Band

The Beatles: Rock Band is a music video game developed by Harmonix 
Music Systems, published by MTV Games and distributed by Electronic 
Arts. It is the third major console release in the Rock Band music 
video game series and, like other games in the series, it allows 
players to simulate the playing of rock music by using controllers 
shaped like musical instruments. The game's soundtrack consists of 
45 songs by popular British rock group The Beatles and features virtual 
depictions of the band members performing the songs. The game was 
released internationally on 9 September 2009, coinciding with the 
release of new, remastered compact disc versions of The Beatles albums. 
It incorporates many of the gameplay features of the Rock Band series; 
however, it is not an expansion pack for the Rock Band series. Gameplay 
mechanics differ slightly from previous Rock Band games, including the 
addition of a three-part vocal harmony system. The game was developed 
with the blessing and critical input of Apple Corps, including former 
Beatles members Sir Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr. George Harrison's 
son Dhani helped to bridge discussion between Harmonix and Apple Corps, 
while Giles Martin, son of The Beatles' music producer George Martin, 
ensured high-quality versions of The Beatles' songs would be available. 
The Beatles: Rock Band was well-received by the press, both as a 
genuine means of experiencing the music and history of The Beatles and 
as a standalone music video game.

Read the rest of this article:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Beatles%3A_Rock_Band>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1039:
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] June 5: The Open Boat

"The Open Boat" is a short story by American author Stephen Crane. 
First published in 1897, it was based on Crane's experience of having 
survived a shipwreck off the coast of Florida earlier that year while 
traveling to Cuba to work as a newspaper correspondent. Crane was 
stranded at sea for thirty hours when his ship, the SS Commodore, sank 
after hitting a sandbar. He and three other men were forced to navigate 
their way to shore in a small boat; one of the men, an oiler named 
Billie Higgins, drowned. Crane subsequently adapted his report into 
narrative form, and the short story "The Open Boat" was published in 
Scribner's Magazine. The story is told from the point of view of an 
anonymous correspondent, Crane's fictional doppelgänger, and the action 
closely resembles the author's experiences after the shipwreck. A 
volume titled The Open Boat and Other Tales of Adventure was published 
in the United States in 1898. Praised for its innovation by 
contemporary critics, the story is considered an exemplary work of 
literary Naturalism. One of the most frequently discussed works in 
Crane's canon, it is notable for its use of imagery, irony, symbolism, 
and exploration of themes including survival, solidarity, and the 
conflict between man and nature. H. G. Wells considered "The Open Boat" 
to be "beyond all question, the crown of all [Crane's] work".

Read the rest of this article:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Open_Boat>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1257:

Kraków in Poland received city rights.
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] June 6: Helmut Lent

Helmut Lent (1918–1944) was a German night fighter ace in World War II 
who shot down 110 aircraft, 103 of them at night. Lent claimed his 
first aerial victories at the outset of World War II in the invasion of 
Poland and over the German Bight. During the invasion of Norway he flew 
ground support missions before he was transferred to the newly 
established Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 (NJG 1), a night fighter wing. Lent 
claimed his first nocturnal aerial victory on 12 May 1941 and on 30 
August 1941 was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross for 22 
aerial victories—8 daytime and 14 nocturnal aerial victories. His 
steady accumulation of aerial victories resulted in regular promotions 
and awards. On the night of 15 June 1944, Major Lent was the first 
night fighter pilot to claim 100 nocturnal aerial victories, a feat 
which earned him the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, 
Swords and Diamonds on 31 July 1944. On 5 October 1944, Lent flew a 
Junkers Ju 88 on a routine transit flight from Stade to Nordborchen, 
5 kilometres (3.1 mi) south of Paderborn. On the landing approach one 
of the engines cut out, stalling the aircraft. All four members of the 
crew were mortally injured. Three men died shortly after the crash and 
Lent succumbed to his injuries two days later on 7 October 1944.

Read the rest of this article:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmut_Lent>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1523:

Gustav Vasa became King of Sweden, marking the end of the Kalmar Union.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustav_I_of_Sweden>
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] June 7: Edwin P. Morrow

Edwin P. Morrow (1877–1935) served as the 40th Governor of Kentucky 
from 1919 to 1923. He was the only Republican elected to this office 
between 1907 and 1927. After rendering non-combat service in the 
Spanish–American War, Morrow graduated from the University of 
Cincinnati Law School in 1902 and opened his practice in Lexington, 
Kentucky. He was appointed U.S. District Attorney for the Eastern 
District of Kentucky by President William Howard Taft in 1910 and 
served until he was removed from office in 1913 by President Woodrow 
Wilson. In 1915, he ran for governor against his good friend, Augustus 
O. Stanley. Stanley won the election by 471 votes, making the 1915 
contest the closest gubernatorial race in the state's history. Morrow 
ran for governor again in 1919. He encouraged voters to "Right the 
Wrong of 1915" and ran on a progressive platform that included women's 
suffrage and quelling racial violence. He charged the Democratic 
administration with corruption, citing specific examples, and won the 
general election in a landslide. With a friendly legislature in 1920, 
he passed much of his agenda into law including an anti-lynching law 
and a reorganization of state government. By 1922, Democrats regained 
control of the General Assembly, and Morrow was not able to accomplish 
much in the second half of his term. Following his term as governor, he 
served on the United States Railroad Labor Board and the Railway 
Mediation Board.

Read the rest of this article:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_P._Morrow>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1494:
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] June 8: Portrait of a Lady (van der Weyden)

Portrait of a Lady is a small oil-on-oak panel executed around 1460 by 
the Netherlandish painter Rogier van der Weyden. The composition is 
built from underlying geometric shapes that form the lines of the 
woman's veil, neckline, face and arms, and by the fall of the light 
that illuminates her face and headdress. Van der Weyden was preoccupied 
by portraiture towards the end of his life and was highly regarded by 
later generations of painters for his penetrating evocations of 
character. In this work, the woman's humility and reserved demeanour 
are conveyed through her fragile physique, lowered eyes and tightly 
grasped fingers. She is slender and depicted according to the Gothic 
ideal of elongated features, indicated by her narrow shoulders, tightly 
pinned hair, long forehead and the elaborate frame set the headdress. 
It is the only known portrait of a woman signed by van der Weyden, yet 
the sitter's name is not recorded and he did not title the work. 
Although van der Weyden did not adhere to the conventions of 
idealisation, he generally sought to flatter his sitters. He depicted 
his models in highly fashionable clothing, often with rounded—almost 
sculpted—facial features, some of which deviated from natural 
representation. He adapted his own aesthetic, and his portraits of 
women often bear a striking resemblance to each other. Since 1937, the 
painting has been held by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, 
D.C. It has been described as "famous among all portraits of women of 
all schools".

Read the rest of this article:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portrait_of_a_Lady_%28van_der_Weyden%29>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] June 9: Halkett boat

Halkett boat refers to two types of lightweight inflatable boat 
designed by Lt Peter Halkett during the 1840s. Halkett had long been 
interested in the difficulties of travelling in the Canadian Arctic, 
and the problems involved in designing boats light enough to be carried 
over arduous terrain, but robust enough to be used in extreme weather 
conditions. Halkett's first design was a collapsible and inflatable 
boat made of rubber-impregnated cloth. When deflated, the hull of the 
boat could be worn as a cloak, the oar used as a walking stick, and the 
sail as an umbrella. This was followed by a two-man craft that was 
small enough to fit into a knapsack, and when deflated served as a 
waterproof blanket. Although widely praised by Canadian explorers, the 
market for Halkett's designs was limited, and he was unable to persuade 
the Royal Navy that they would serve any useful purpose in general 
naval service. Efforts to market them as platforms for fishing and duck 
shooting failed, and they were commercially unsuccessful. Only a single 
Halkett boat, that of Orcadian explorer John Rae, is known to survive 
today.

Read the rest of this article:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halkett_boat>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

68:

Roman Emperor Nero committed suicide after he was deposed by the 
Senate.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nero>

(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] June 10: Ashford v Thornton

Ashford v Thornton was an 1818 English legal case in the Court of 
King's Bench that upheld the right of the defendant, on a private 
appeal from an acquittal for murder, to trial by battle. In 1817, 
Abraham Thornton was charged with the murder of Mary Ashford. Thornton 
met Ashford at a dance, and walked with her from the event. The next 
morning, Ashford was found drowned in a pit, with little outward signs 
of violence. Although public opinion was heavily against Thornton, the 
jury quickly acquitted him, and also found him not guilty of rape. 
Mary's brother, William Ashford, launched an appeal, and Thornton was 
rearrested. Thornton claimed the right to trial by battle, a medieval 
usage which had never been repealed by Parliament. Ashford argued that 
the evidence against Thornton was overwhelming, and that he was thus 
ineligible to wager battle. The court decided that the evidence against 
Thornton was not overwhelming, and that trial by battle was a 
permissible option under law; thus Thornton was granted trial by 
battle. Ashford declined the offer of battle and Thornton was freed 
from custody. Appeals such as Ashford's were abolished by statute the 
following year, and with them the right to trial by battle. Thornton 
emigrated to the United States, where he died about 1860.

Read the rest of this article:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashford_v_Thornton>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1190:

The Third Crusade: Frederick I Barbarossa drowned in the Saleph River 
in Anatolia.
(Continue reading)


Gmane