Picon

[Daily article] May 6: 2002 Pacific typhoon season

The 2002 Pacific typhoon season, covering the Pacific north of the
equator and west of the International Date Line, was very active, with
many tropical cyclones affecting the Philippines, Japan, and China,
especially from July to October. Overall, there were 37 tropical
depressions declared officially or unofficially, of which 26 became
named storms, including 15 typhoons (hurricanes). The season began
early: Tapah developed on January 10 east of the Philippines. Two months
later, Typhoon Mitag became the first recorded super typhoon in March.
In June, Typhoon Chataan dropped heavy rainfall in the Federated States
of Micronesia, killing 48 people and becoming the deadliest natural
disaster in the state of Chuuk. Chataan later left heavy damage in Guam
before striking Japan. In August, Typhoon Rusa became the deadliest
typhoon in South Korea in 43 years, causing 238 deaths and $4.2 billion
in damage. Typhoon Higos (pictured) in October was the third-strongest
typhoon to strike Tokyo since World War II. Typhoon Pongsona, the last
of the season, became one of the costliest storms ($700 million) on
record in Guam; it dissipated on December 11.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2002_Pacific_typhoon_season>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1757:

English poet Christopher Smart was admitted into St Luke's
Hospital for Lunatics in London, beginning his six-year confinement to
mental asylums.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Smart%27s_asylum_confinement>

(Continue reading)

Picon

May 5: Kosta Pećanac

Kosta Pećanac (1879–1944) was a Serbian Chetnik commander during both
of the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II. Pećanac (pictured,
second from left) fought on the Serbian side in the Balkan Wars and
World War I, joining the Toplica uprising of 1917. After the war he was
an important leader of Chetnik veteran associations, known for his
strong hostility to the Yugoslav Communist Party, which made him popular
with conservatives. As president of the Chetnik Association, he
transformed the association during the 1930s into an aggressively
partisan Serb political organisation with over half a million members.
During World War II, Pećanac collaborated with the German military
administration and with their Serbian puppet government in the Territory
of the Military Commander in Serbia. In July 1942, rival Chetnik leader
Draža Mihailović arranged for the Yugoslav government-in-exile to
denounce Pećanac as a traitor, and his continuing collaboration with
the Germans ruined what remained of the reputation he had developed in
the Balkan Wars and World War I. By March 1943, the Germans saw
Pećanac's Chetniks as inefficient and unreliable, and disbanded them.
He was interned, then killed in May or June 1944 by agents of
Mihailović.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosta_Pe%C4%87anac>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

553:

The Second Council of Constantinople, considered by many
Christian churches to have been the fifth Christian Ecumenical Council,
began to discuss the topics of Nestorianism and Origenism, among others.
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] May 4: Secret of Mana

Secret of Mana is a 1993 action role-playing game in the Mana series,
developed and published by Square for the Super Nintendo Entertainment
System. The sequel to the 1991 game Final Fantasy Adventure (Mystic
Quest in Europe), the game follows three heroes as they attempt to
prevent an empire from conquering the world from an ancient flying
warship. Unlike other role-playing games of the time, it features
pausable real-time battles. A cooperative multiplayer system allows a
second or third player to drop in and out of the game at any time.
Secret of Mana was directed and designed by Koichi Ishii, programmed
primarily by Nasir Gebelli (pictured), and produced by veteran Square
designer Hiromichi Tanaka. The game received considerable acclaim for
its brightly colored graphics, expansive plot, innovative menus, and
real-time battle system. Critics also praised the soundtrack by Hiroki
Kikuta and the customizable artificial intelligence settings for
computer-controlled allies. The original version was re-released for the
Wii's Virtual Console in 2008, an additional release for mobile phones
in Japan was produced in 2009, and an enhanced port of the game was
released for iOS in 2010 and Android in 2014.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secret_of_Mana>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1493:

Pope Alexander VI issued the papal bull Inter caetera,
establishing a line of demarcation dividing the New World between Spain
and Portugal.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inter_caetera>
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] May 3: Javan slow loris

The Javan slow loris (Nycticebus javanicus) is a primate species native
to western and central Java in Indonesia, most closely related to the
Sunda and Bengal slow lorises. The species has two forms distinguishable
by hair length and coloration, both with a prominent white diamond
pattern on the forehead. It weighs between 565 and 687 g (1.246 and
1.515 lb) and has a head-body length of about 293 mm (11.5 in). Like
all lorises it is arboreal, and moves slowly across vines and lianas
instead of jumping from tree to tree. It is usually found in primary and
secondary forests, and sometimes in bamboo and mangrove forests or
chocolate plantations. Its diet typically consists of fruit, tree gum,
lizards and eggs. It is usually seen alone or in pairs, and sleeps on
exposed branches, sometimes in groups. Its population is in sharp
decline through habitat loss and poaching, for the exotic pet trade and
sometimes for traditional medicine. Listed by the International Union
for Conservation of Nature as critically endangered, it is protected by
Indonesian law, but the wildlife protection laws are rarely enforced at
the local level.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Javan_slow_loris>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1491:

Nkuwu Nzinga of the Kingdom of Kongo was baptised as João I
by Portuguese missionaries.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jo%C3%A3o_I_of_Kongo>

1855:
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] May 1: The Tower House

The Tower House in London's Holland Park district of Kensington and
Chelsea is a late Victorian townhouse, built between 1875 and 1881 by
the architect and designer William Burges as his personal residence.
Designed in the French Gothic Revival style, it was described by the
architectural historian J. Mordaunt Crook as "the most complete example
of a medieval secular interior produced by the Gothic Revival, and the
last". The exterior and the interior echo elements of Burges's earlier
work. The house was built of red brick, with a distinctive cylindrical
tower and conical roof, by the Ashby Brothers, with interior decoration
by members of Burges's long-standing team of craftsmen including Thomas
Nicholls and Henry Stacy Marks. The house retains most of its internal
structural decoration, but much of the furniture, fittings and contents
that Burges designed have been dispersed. Many items, including the
Great Bookcase, the Zodiac Settle, the Golden Bed and the Red Bed, are
now in institutions such as The Higgins Art Gallery & Museum and the
Victoria and Albert Museum. It was designated a Grade I listed building
in 1949.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tower_House>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

880:

The Nea Ekklesia church in Constantinople was consecrated, and
went on to set the model for all later cross-in-square Orthodox
churches.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nea_Ekklesia>

(Continue reading)

Picon

April 30: Æthelwold ætheling

Æthelwold was a son of King Alfred the Great's older brother,
Æthelred, who was King of Wessex from 865 to 871. While the West Saxons
were fighting a Danish Viking invasion, Æthelred died; his sons were
infants, so Alfred became king. He defeated the Vikings at the Battle of
Edington in 878, but when he died in 899 the Vikings still controlled
Northumbria and East Anglia. In his will (pictured) Alfred favoured his
own children over his brother's. Æthelwold, as senior ætheling (prince
of the royal dynasty eligible for kingship), had a strong claim to the
throne, and he disputed the crown with Alfred's son, Edward the Elder.
Æthelwold attempted to raise an army to support his claim, but was
unable to get sufficient support to meet Edward in battle and fled to
Northumbria, where he was accepted by the Danes as king. In 902 he
persuaded the East Anglian Vikings to launch an attack on Edward's
territory in Wessex and Mercia. Edward retaliated with a raid on East
Anglia, and when he withdrew, his men from Kent lingered and met the
East Anglian Danes at the Battle of the Holme. The Danes were victorious
but suffered heavy losses, including the death of Æthelwold, ending the
challenge to Edward's rule.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86thelwold_%C3%A6theling>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1006:

SN 1006 (remnant pictured), the brightest supernova in recorded
history, first appeared in the constellation Lupus.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SN_1006>

(Continue reading)

Picon

April 28: History of the National Hockey League (1967–92)

The expansion era of the National Hockey League (NHL) began when six new
teams were added to the original six for the 1967–68 season. The
expansion teams formed the newly created West Division: the Los Angeles
Kings, Minnesota North Stars, Oakland Seals, Philadelphia Flyers,
Pittsburgh Penguins and St. Louis Blues. By 1978, the NHL had lost the
Seals and had added another six teams: the Buffalo Sabres, Vancouver
Canucks, Atlanta Flames, New York Islanders, Colorado Rockies, and
Washington Capitals. They added another four teams in 1979, absorbed
from the defunct World Hockey Association—the Edmonton Oilers,
Hartford Whalers, Quebec Nordiques and Winnipeg Jets—for a total of 21
teams, a figure that remained constant until the San Jose Sharks joined
as an expansion franchise in 1991. The NHL became involved in
international play in the Summit Series in 1972, matching NHL players
against the top players of the Soviet Union, and in the Canada Cup and
Super Series between 1976 and 1991. The expansion era was one of the
highest-scoring periods in NHL history, led in the 1980s by the Edmonton
Oilers and Wayne Gretzky (pictured in 2006), who scored 215 points in
1985–86, still a league record.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_National_Hockey_League_(1967%E2%80%9392)>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1253:

Nichiren, a Japanese monk, expounded Nam Myoho Renge Kyo for
the first time and declared it to be the essence of Buddhism, in effect
founding Nichiren Buddhism.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nichiren_Buddhism>
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] April 27: Wish You Were Here (Pink Floyd album)

Wish You Were Here (1975) is the ninth studio album by the English
progressive rock group Pink Floyd (pictured), recorded at London's Abbey
Road Studios. Some of its songs critique the music business; others
express alienation. "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" is a tribute to Syd
Barrett, whose mental breakdown had forced him to leave the group
several years earlier; it was lead writer Roger Waters' idea to split
the song into two parts and use it to bookend the other songs on the
album. As on their previous album, The Dark Side of the Moon, the band
made use of studio effects and synthesizers, and brought in guest
singers for some tracks, including Roy Harper for the lead vocals on
"Have a Cigar". The album became an instant commercial success, and
record company EMI was unable to print enough copies to satisfy demand.
Although it initially received mixed reviews, the album has since been
acclaimed by critics and appears on Rolling Stone‍ '​s list of
"The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time". Band members Richard Wright and
David Gilmour have each cited Wish You Were Here as their favourite Pink
Floyd album.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wish_You_Were_Here_(Pink_Floyd_album)>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

395:

Aelia Eudoxia married Byzantine emperor Arcadius without the
knowledge or consent of Rufinus, the Praetorian prefect who had intended
for his own daughter to wed the emperor.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aelia_Eudoxia>

(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] April 26: Constance Stokes

Constance Stokes (1906–1991) was a modernist Australian painter
working in Victoria. She trained at the National Gallery of Victoria Art
School until 1929, winning a scholarship to continue her study at
London's Royal Academy of Arts. Her paintings and drawings were
exhibited from the 1940s onwards, and she was one of only two women
included in a major exhibition of twelve Australian artists that
travelled to Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy in the early 1950s.
Influenced by George Bell, Stokes was part of the Melbourne Contemporary
Artists, a group Bell established in 1940, and her works continued to be
well-regarded by art historians for many years after the group's
formation. Her husband's early death in 1962 forced her to return to
painting as a career, resulting in a successful one-woman show in 1964,
her first in thirty years. She continued to paint and exhibit through
the 1980s. Her work faded into relative obscurity after her death, until
the publication of Anne Summers' 2009 book The Lost Mother, a narrative
that highlights Stokes and her paintings. Her art is represented in most
major Australian galleries, including the National Gallery of Australia
and the National Gallery of Victoria.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constance_Stokes>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1865:

U.S. Army soldiers cornered and fatally shot John Wilkes Booth,
the assassin of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, in rural northern
Virginia, ending a twelve-day manhunt.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wilkes_Booth>
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] April 25: Amphibian

Amphibians are a class of cold-blooded vertebrates, mostly four-limbed.
They inhabit a wide variety of habitats in freshwater, on or under the
ground, or in trees. Typically starting their lives as aquatic larvae
with gills, they generally undergo metamorphosis into adults with air-
breathing lungs. They use their skins as a secondary respiratory
surface; some small terrestrial salamanders and frogs lack lungs and
rely entirely on their skins. The earliest amphibians evolved in the
Devonian Period from fish with lungs and bony-limbed fins. The three
modern orders of amphibians are Anura (the frogs and toads), Caudata
(the salamanders), and Gymnophiona (the caecilians). The number of known
species is approximately 7,000, of which nearly 90% are frogs. The
smallest living amphibian is a frog from New Guinea with a length of
just 7.7 mm (0.3 in). The largest is the 1.8 m (5 ft 11 in) Chinese
giant salamander, but this is dwarfed by the extinct 9 m (30 ft)
Prionosuchus from Brazil. With their complex reproductive needs and
permeable skins, amphibians are often indicators of ecological
disturbance, and in recent decades their populations have declined
around the globe.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amphibian>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1644:

The Ming dynasty of China fell when the Chongzhen Emperor
committed suicide during a peasant rebellion led by Li Zicheng.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ming_dynasty>

(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] April 24: Colton Point State Park

Colton Point State Park is a 368-acre (149 ha) Pennsylvania state park
in the United States. It is on the west side of Tioga County's Pine
Creek Gorge, also known as the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania, which is
800 feet (240 m) deep and nearly 4,000 feet (1,200 m) across at this
location. The park, named for Henry Colton, a Williamsport lumberman who
cut timber there starting in 1879, extends from the creek in the bottom
of the gorge up to the rim and across part of the plateau to the west.
Known for its views of the gorge, it offers opportunities for
picnicking, hiking, fishing, hunting, whitewater boating, and camping.
It was chosen by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources for its "Twenty Must-See Pennsylvania State Parks" list. Pine
Creek has carved the gorge through five major rock formations from the
Devonian and Carboniferous periods. A path along Pine Creek was first
used by Native Americans, then lumbermen, and from 1883 to 1988 it was
the route of a railroad. The gorge was named a National Natural Landmark
in 1968.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colton_Point_State_Park>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1547:

Schmalkaldic War: Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, led Imperial
troops to a decisive victory in the Battle of Mühlberg over the
Lutheran Schmalkaldic League of Protestant princes.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_M%C3%BChlberg>

1800:
(Continue reading)


Gmane