Picon

[Daily article] January 29: Lanny McDonald

Lanny McDonald (born 1953) is a former professional ice hockey player
for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Colorado Rockies and Calgary Flames of the
National Hockey League (NHL). He played over 1,100 games during a
16-year career, scoring exactly 500 goals and over 1,000 points. His
total of 66 goals in 1982–83 remains the Flames' franchise record.
McDonald established himself as an offensive forward with three
consecutive 40-goal seasons in Toronto in the mid-1970s. He played parts
of three seasons in Denver before he was sent to Calgary in 1981 where
he spent the remainder of his career. He co-captained the Flames to a
Stanley Cup championship in his final season of 1988–89. McDonald won
the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy for dedication and sportsmanship in
1983 and in 1988 was named the inaugural winner of the King Clancy
Memorial Trophy for his leadership and humanitarian presence, in
particular through his long association with the Special Olympics.
Internationally, he represented Team Canada as a player on two occasions
and in a management role three times. McDonald was inducted into the
Hockey Hall of Fame in 1992 and the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame in 1993.
The Flames retired his uniform number 9 in 1990.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lanny_McDonald>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

757:

An Lushan, leader of a revolt against the Tang dynasty and
emperor of Yan, was murdered by his own son, An Qingxu.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/An_Lushan>

(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] January 28: Ralph Richardson

Ralph Richardson (1902–1983) was an English actor who played more than
sixty film roles and, along with his contemporaries John Gielgud and
Laurence Olivier, dominated the British stage of the mid-20th century.
In 1931 he joined the Old Vic, playing mostly Shakespearean roles. He
led the company the following season, succeeding Gielgud, who had taught
him much about stage technique. After he left the company, a series of
leading roles took him to stardom in the West End and on Broadway. In
the 1940s, Richardson was the co-director of the Old Vic company. He and
Olivier led the company to Europe and Broadway in 1945 and 1946. In the
1950s, in the West End and occasionally on tour, Richardson played in
modern and classic works including The Heiress, Home at Seven and Three
Sisters. Richardson was cast in leading roles in British and American
films including Things to Come in the 1930s, The Fallen Idol and The
Heiress in the 1940s, and Long Day's Journey into Night and Doctor
Zhivago in the 1960s. He received nominations and awards in the UK,
Europe and the US for his stage and screen work from 1948 until his
sudden death at the age of eighty, and earned a posthumous Academy Award
nomination for his final film, Greystoke.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Richardson>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

98:

Trajan (bust pictured) succeeded his adoptive father Nerva as
Roman emperor; under his rule the Roman Empire would reach its maximum
extent.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trajan>
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] January 27: Batman: Arkham City

Batman: Arkham City is a 2011 action-adventure video game developed by
Rocksteady Studios and released by Warner Bros. Interactive
Entertainment for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game consoles,
and Microsoft Windows. Based on the DC Comics superhero Batman and
written by Paul Dini with Paul Crocker and Sefton Hill, it is the sequel
to the 2009 video game Batman: Arkham Asylum. Incarcerated in Arkham
City, a massive new super-prison enclosing the decaying urban slums of
fictional Gotham City, Batman must uncover the secret behind the
sinister scheme "Protocol 10", orchestrated by the facility's warden,
Hugo Strange. The game's leading characters are predominantly voiced by
actors from the DC Animated Universe, with Kevin Conroy reprising his
role as Batman and Mark Hamill as the Joker. Using third-person
perspective, the game focuses on Batman's combat and stealth abilities,
detective skills, and gadgets for combat and exploration. The game was
praised for its narrative, characters and world designs and for Batman's
combat and navigation abilities. It was tied for the highest-rated video
game of 2011 according to review aggregator Metacritic, and was the
recipient of several awards.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batman:_Arkham_City>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

447:

An earthquake destroyed large sections of the Walls of
Constantinople.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walls_of_Constantinople>

(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] January 26: Peasants' Revolt

The Peasants' Revolt was an uprising in England in 1381, brought on by
economic and social upheaval that had been growing since the Black Death
thirty years earlier. The rebels, coming from a wide spectrum of rural
society, sought a reduction in the high taxes financing the Hundred
Years' War, an end to the system of unfree labour known as serfdom and
the removal of the King's senior officials and law courts. Inspired by
the radical cleric John Ball and led by Wat Tyler, Kentish rebels
entered London on 13 June. They destroyed the Temple Inns of Court and
set fire to law books. The following day, the fourteen-year-old King
Richard acceded to most of the rebels' demands, including the abolition
of serfdom; meanwhile, the Lord Chancellor and the Lord High Treasurer
were killed in the Tower of London (pictured). On 15 June Richard met
Tyler and the rebels at Smithfield, but violence broke out and Tyler was
killed by the king's party. A London militia then dispersed the rebel
forces and Richard rescinded his previous grants to the rebels. Troubles
extended as far as East Anglia, Yorkshire and Somerset, but most of the
rebel leaders were tracked down and executed, and at least 1,500 rebels
were killed.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peasants%27_Revolt>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1500:

Spanish navigator, explorer, and conquistador Vicente Yáñez
Pinzón reached the north coast of what today is Brazil.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicente_Y%C3%A1%C3%B1ez_Pinz%C3%B3n>

(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] January 25: Cry Me a River (Justin Timberlake song)

"Cry Me a River" is a song recorded by American singer-songwriter Justin
Timberlake (pictured) for his debut studio album, Justified (2002).
Taking inspiration from his former relationship with singer Britney
Spears, he wrote it with Scott Storch and Timbaland. Jive Records
released the song to contemporary hit and rhythmic radio in the US in
2002 as the album's second single. Accompanied by an electric piano,
beatboxing, guitars, and synthesizers, "Cry Me a River" is a funk and
R&B; song about a brokenhearted man moving on from his unfaithful
girlfriend. It received generally positive reviews from critics, who
considered it a stand-out track on Justified and praised Timbaland's
production. It won a Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance at
the 2004 ceremony, and the music video won the awards for Best Male
Video and Best Pop Video at the 2003 MTV Video Music Awards. The song
peaked at number three on the US Billboard Hot 100 and Pop Songs charts
and charted in the top ten in other countries. Timberlake performed "Cry
Me a River" on his four major concert tours from 2003 through 2015. The
song has been covered by Leona Lewis and Taylor Swift, among others.
Spears recorded an answer song titled "Everytime" for her 2003 studio
album In the Zone.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cry_Me_a_River_(Justin_Timberlake_song)>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1533:

Anne Boleyn, already pregnant with future queen Elizabeth,
secretly married Henry VIII of England, the second of his six
marriages.
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] January 24: Thomas Blamey

Thomas Blamey (1884–1951) was an Australian general of the First and
Second World Wars, and the only Australian ever to attain the rank of
field marshal. He joined the Australian Army as a regular soldier in
1906, and served at Gallipoli, where he led a daring raid behind enemy
lines, and on the Western Front as chief of staff of the Australian
Corps under Lieutenant General Sir John Monash. During the Second World
War he commanded the Second Australian Imperial Force and the I Corps in
the Middle East. In 1942, he returned to Australia as Commander in Chief
of the Australian Military Forces and Commander of Allied Land Forces in
the South West Pacific Area under the command of General Douglas
MacArthur. On the orders of MacArthur and Prime Minister John Curtin, he
assumed personal command of New Guinea Force during the Kokoda Track
Campaign. He won a series of victories over the Japanese, including the
Battle of Wau and the landing at Nadzab, and signed on behalf of
Australia at Japan's ceremonial surrender in Tokyo Bay on 2 September
1945. He was promoted to field marshal in June 1950.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Blamey>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

41:

Cassius Chaerea and the disgruntled Praetorian Guards murdered
Roman emperor Caligula (bust pictured), replacing him with his uncle
Claudius.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caligula>

1458:
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] January 23: Rainbow trout

The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is a species of the salmon
family native to cold-water tributaries of the Pacific Ocean in Asia and
North America. Those that spend their lives in streams and rivers
average between 1 and 5 lb (0.5 and 2.3 kg); others, called steelhead
trout, live in the ocean or the Great Lakes for two to three years
before returning to fresh water to spawn, and may reach 20 lb
(9.1 kg). Coloration varies widely, but all adult fish are
distinguished by a broad reddish stripe along the lateral line, from
gills to the tail, which is most vivid in breeding males. Wild-caught
and hatchery-reared forms of this species have been transplanted and
introduced for food or sport in at least 45 countries. Introductions to
locations in the U.S., Southern Europe, Australia and South America
outside the fish's native range have damaged native fish species when
the trout has preyed on them, out-competed them, transmitted contagious
diseases, or hybridized with closely related species. Some local
populations of specific subspecies, or in the case of steelhead,
distinct population segments, are listed as either threatened or
endangered under the Endangered Species Act. The steelhead is the
official state fish of Washington.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainbow_trout>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1719:

Emperor Charles VI established Liechtenstein, the only
principality in the Holy Roman Empire still in existence today.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liechtenstein>
(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] January 22: Union Films

Union Films was a film production company located in Batavia, Dutch East
Indies (now Jakarta, Indonesia). It was one of four new production
houses that sprang up during a revival of the colony's film industry
after the Great Depression. Established by ethnic Chinese businessmen
Ang Hock Liem and Tjoa Ma Tjoen, Union released its first film, Kedok
Ketawa, in July 1940. This was followed by a series of films penned by
Saeroen, beginning with Harta Berdarah and followed by Bajar dengan
Djiwa and Asmara Moerni, which attempted to distance themselves from the
theatrical conventions of the time, and were increasingly oriented
towards the Indies' growing intelligentsia. After Saeroen left for Star
Film in 1941, Union's final two productions, Soeara Berbisa and Mega
Mendoeng, emphasised realism. Following the Japanese occupation of the
Indies in March 1942, Union was dissolved, though its films continued to
be screened into the mid-1940s. Altogether, the company produced seven
black-and-white films; all may be lost. The company's films were
directed by four men, mostly ethnic Chinese, and launched the careers of
actors such as Rendra Karno and Djoewariah.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Films>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

565:

Justinian the Great deposed Eutychius, Patriarch of
Constantinople, after the latter refused the Byzantine Emperor's order
to adopt the tenets of the Aphthartodocetae, a sect of Monophysites.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eutychius_of_Constantinople>

(Continue reading)

Picon

January 21: Siege of Constantinople (717–18)

The Second Arab Siege of Constantinople in 717–718 was a land and sea
offensive by the Arabs of the Umayyad Caliphate against the capital city
of the Byzantine Empire, Constantinople. In 716, after 20 years of
progressive occupation of the borderlands of Byzantium during its
prolonged internal turmoil, Arabs led by Maslama ibn Abd al-Malik
invaded Byzantine Asia Minor. They made common cause with the general
Leo the Isaurian, who had risen up against Emperor Theodosios III, but
Leo tricked them and secured the Byzantine throne for himself in 717.
The Arab army then crossed into Thrace and built siege lines to blockade
the city, which was protected by the massive Theodosian Walls. The Arab
fleet's attempted blockade was neutralized by the Byzantine navy's Greek
fire (pictured), and the Arab army was crippled by famine and disease
during the unusually hard winter that followed. After the defeat of two
Arab fleets and another Arab army, followed by an attack on their rear
by Bulgarians, the siege was lifted in 718. Although regular attacks on
Byzantine territories continued, the Caliphate's goal of conquest was
abandoned. Historians credit the siege with halting the Muslim advance
into Europe, and rank it among history's most consequential battles.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Constantinople_(717%E2%80%9318)>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1789:

The Power of Sympathy by William Hill Brown, widely considered
to be the first American novel, was published.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_of_Sympathy>

(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] January 20: E. W. Hornung

E. W. Hornung (1866–1921) was an English author and poet who wrote the
A. J. Raffles series of stories about a gentleman thief in late 19th-
century London. After school in the UK, Hornung spent two years in
Australia before returning to London. His first known work was published
in 1887; his Australian experiences strongly influenced his early
writing. In 1898 he wrote "In the Chains of Crime", which introduced
Raffles and his sidekick, Bunny Manders; the characters were based
partly on his friends Oscar Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas, and also on
Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, the characters created by Hornung's
brother-in-law, Arthur Conan Doyle. The death of Hornung's son in the
First World War brought an end to Hornung's storytelling, and led the
writer to join the YMCA, initially in England, then in France, where he
helped run a canteen and library and published two collections of
poetry. After the war, he wrote more poetry and an account of his time
in France. Hornung's fragile constitution was weakened by the stress of
his war work, and he died at the age of 54. Although much of Hornung's
work has fallen into obscurity, his Raffles stories continue to be
popular, and have inspired numerous film and television adaptations.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E._W._Hornung>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1265:

Summoned by Simon de Montfort (pictured), the first English
parliament held its first meeting in the Palace of Westminster.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Montfort%27s_Parliament>

(Continue reading)

Picon

[Daily article] January 19: Stan Musial

Stan Musial (1920–2013) was an American professional baseball player
and Navy veteran of World War II. He was a Major League Baseball
outfielder and first baseman on the St. Louis Cardinals for 22 seasons,
from 1941 through 1963. Widely considered to be one of the greatest
hitters in baseball history, with 3,630 career hits, Musial ranks fourth
all-time and first in a career spent with only one team. He hit 475 home
runs during his career and was named the National League's Most Valuable
Player three times. In 1946 he earned his third and final World Series
title, despite missing the entire previous season serving with the navy.
He shares the major league record for the most All-Star Games played
(24) with Hank Aaron and Willie Mays, and was a first-ballot inductee
into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969. He was also known for his
harmonica playing, during and after his playing career, and for his
modesty and sportsmanship. Musial was selected for the Major League
Baseball All-Century Team in 1999. In February 2011, President Barack
Obama presented Musial with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, one of
the highest civilian awards the US government can bestow.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Musial>

_______________________________
Today's selected anniversaries:

1607:

San Agustin Church in Manila, the oldest church in the
Philippines, was completed.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Agustin_Church_(Manila)>

1795:
(Continue reading)


Gmane