Caroline Sporleder | 1 Dec 10:36 2011
Picon

1st CFP: ACL-2012 Workshop ExProM "Extra-propositional aspects of meaning in computational linguistics"

-------- Apologies for multiple postings ----------------

===========================================
FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS
===========================================

ACL Workshop  ExProM 2012
Extra-propositional aspects of meaning in computational linguistics

Organised by the University of Antwerp and Saarland University
Colocated with ACL 2012

July 2012, Jeju Island, Korea

http://www.clips.ua.ac.be/exprom2012

===========================================

Papers are invited for the one-day workshop to be held in Jeju Island, 
Korea, in  July 2012 (12, 13, or 14 - to be determined).

Until recently, research in Natural Language Processing (NLP) has focused 
predominantly on propositional aspects of meaning. For example, semantic 
role labeling, question answering or text mining tasks aim at extracting 
information of the type "who does what, when and where''. However, 
understanding language involves also processing Extra-Propositional 
Aspects of Meaning (EPAM), such as factuality, uncertainty, or 
subjectivity, since the same propositional meaning can be presented in a 
diversity of statements. While some work on phenomena like subjectivity 
has been carried out in the context of sentiment processing, other 
(Continue reading)

Hewitt, Stephen | 1 Dec 13:57 2011

searchable Arabic spontaneous oral MSA corpus

Dear all,

I am looking for a searchable corpus of spontaneous oral MSA (Modern Standard Arabic).

I am particularly interested in instances of what I call “faulty accusatives”, cf:

wāħid: ’an yakūn ladēk hadafan “One: that you should have an objective” Muħammad Ħasanain Haikal, Ma‘a Haikal (With Haikal), Al-Jazeera, 2008.03.20.

In other words, examples of erroneous use (according to Arabic grammatical tradition) of the accusative indefinite –an, usually instead of nominative indefinite –un (most often elided).

What can be observed in spontaneous production of MSA appears to correspond very closely to what is known as “syntactic direct object [initial consonant] mutation” in Welsh, which in fact covers rather more than just indefinite direct objects. Quite a lot has been written on Welsh syntactic mutation in recent years, with various explanations for the observable instances, not all of which are covered by traditional grammars.

However, as far as I know, nothing has been written on such “faulty accusatives” in spontaneous MSA; the assumption appears to be that since there are technically no native speakers, there can be no reliable linguistic analysis of such “slips” – they are just random mistakes, not worth analysing.

I am not convinced that that is the case; I believe that some users of MSA achieve near-native fluency, and hence develop their own internal grammar, which may not coincide on all points with the formal traditional grammar of fuṣḥà. Such error patterns thus become significant, revealing something about the speaker’s internal grammar.

Can anyone help me to find a reliable and searchable corpus of spontaneous oral MSA Arabic (either in Arabic script or in transcription) which has not been edited for such “mistakes”. Al-Jazeera post transcripts of some of their live talk shows in which numerous non-MSA items (šū, mā fīš, dil-wa’ti, etc.) are faithfully reproduced, but I am not certain that wāħid: ’an yakūn ladēk hadafan would not be edited to a more “correct” wāħid: ’an yakūn ladēk hadaf.

Many thanks,

Steve Hewitt

s.hewitt <at> unesco.org

 




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Nancy Ide | 1 Dec 17:45 2011

First CFP: Sixth Linguistic Annotation Workshop (LAW VI)

The 6th  Linguistic Annotation Workshop (The LAW VI)
Sponsored by the ACL Special Interest Group on Annotation (SIGANN)

July 12-13, 2012
ICC Jeju
Jeju, Republic of Korea

Linguistic annotation of natural language corpora is the backbone of supervised methods of statistical natural language processing. The Sixth LAW will provide a forum for presentation and discussion of innovative research on all aspects of linguistic annotation, including creation/evaluation of annotation schemes, methods for automatic and manual annotation, use and evaluation of annotation software and frameworks, representation of linguistic data and annotations, etc. As in the past, the LAW will provide a forum for annotation researchers to both work towards standardization, best practices, and interoperability of annotation information and software. 

The special theme for LAW VI is Collaborative Annotation (both community-based and crowd-sourced). The workshop will include a special session on this topic. We invite submissions relating to this theme as well as any aspect of linguistic annotation, including:

Collaborative annotation
Issues, strategies, and results for community-based annotation of common (shared) resources 
Issues, strategies, and results for crowd-sourcing linguistic annotations

Annotation procedures:
Innovative automated and manual strategies for annotation
Machine learning and knowledge-based methods for automation of corpus annotation
Creation, maintenance, and interactive exploration of annotation structures and annotated data

Annotation evaluation:
Inter-annotator agreement and other evaluation metrics and strategies 
Qualitative evaluation of linguistic representation

Annotation access and use:
Representation formats/structures for merged annotations of different phenomena, and means to explore/manipulate them
Linguistic considerations for merging annotations of distinct phenomena 

Annotation guidelines and standards:
Best practices for annotation procedures and/or development and documentation of annotation schemes
Interoperability of annotation formats and/or frameworks among different systems as well as different tasks, frameworks, modalities, and languages

Annotation software and frameworks:
Development, evaluation and/or innovative use of annotation software frameworks

Annotation schemes:
New and innovative annotation schemes 
Comparison of annotation schemes

Submission information

Submissions of long and short papers (8 and 4 pages respectively, excluding references) and demonstrations (4 pages) should be submitted electronically through the system at https://www.softconf.com/acl2012/law-6/. Submissions should conform to the official ACL 2012 style guidelines and be submitted in PDF. Reviewing will be blind, so submissions must not include the authors' names and affiliations.  Please see the guidelines for submissions to the general ACL conference at http://www.acl2012.org/call/sub01.asp for more information.

Important dates

Submission deadline: 18 March 2012 
Acceptance Notification: 15 April, 2012 
Camera ready deadline: 30 April 2012 

Program Committee Co‐Chairs 
Nancy Ide (Vassar College) 
Fei Xia (University of Washington)

Program Committee (to be confirmed)
Eneko Agirre (University of the Basque Country)
Collin Baker (ICSI/UC Berkeley)
Timothy Baldwin (University of Melbourne)
Emily Bender (University of Washington)
Chris Callison-Burch (Johns Hopkins University)
Nicoletta Calzolari (ILC/CNR)
Steve Cassidy (Macquarie University)
Christopher Cieri (Linguistic Data Consortium/University of Pennsylvania)
Mona Diab (Columbia University)
Stefanie Dipper (Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum)
Richard Eckart (Darmstadt University of Technology)
Tomaz Erjavec (Josef Stefan Institute)
Katrin Erk (University of Texas at Austin)
Alex Chengyu Fang (City University of Hong Kong)
Christiane Fellbaum (Princeton University)
Dan Flickinger (Stanford University)
Anete Frank (Universität Heidelberg)
Udo Hahn (Friedrich‐Schiller‐Universität Jena)
Chu‐Ren Huang (Hong Kong Polytechnic)
Aravind Joshi (University of Pennsylvania)
Lluís Marquez (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya)
Adam Meyers (New York University)
Joakim Nivre (Vaxjoniversity and Uppsala University)
Eric Nyberg (Carnegie‐Mellon University)
Antonio Pareja‐Lora (UCM / ATLAS-UNED)
Martha Palmer (University of Colorado)
Christopher Potts (Stanford University)
Sameer Pradhan (BBN Technologies)
James Pustejovsky (Brandeis University)
Owen Rambow (Columbia University)
Manfred Stede (Universität Potsdam)
Mihai Surdeanu (Yahoo! Research, Barcelona)
Theresa Wilson (University of Edinburgh)
Andreas Witt (IDS Mannheim)

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Emad Mohamed | 1 Dec 21:07 2011
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Re: searchable Arabic spontaneous oral MSA corpus

Hello Stephen,
I got interested in this structure a while back, but got busy with other work.
After reading your email, I decided to try and discover whether this structure occurs in more formal discourse, and I searched a small portion of the Arabic Gigaword corpus using a simple, and naive, script that still needs a lot of improvement.

I have found three examples in the portion I examined. The script is attached. It is based on the idea that the structure occurs when we use kAn followed by PREP+NOUN.

On Thu, Dec 1, 2011 at 3:57 PM, Hewitt, Stephen <s.hewitt <at> unesco.org> wrote:

Dear all,

I am looking for a searchable corpus of spontaneous oral MSA (Modern Standard Arabic).

I am particularly interested in instances of what I call “faulty accusatives”, cf:

wāħid: ’an yakūn ladēk hadafan “One: that you should have an objective” Muħammad Ħasanain Haikal, Ma‘a Haikal (With Haikal), Al-Jazeera, 2008.03.20.

In other words, examples of erroneous use (according to Arabic grammatical tradition) of the accusative indefinite –an, usually instead of nominative indefinite –un (most often elided).

What can be observed in spontaneous production of MSA appears to correspond very closely to what is known as “syntactic direct object [initial consonant] mutation” in Welsh, which in fact covers rather more than just indefinite direct objects. Quite a lot has been written on Welsh syntactic mutation in recent years, with various explanations for the observable instances, not all of which are covered by traditional grammars.

However, as far as I know, nothing has been written on such “faulty accusatives” in spontaneous MSA; the assumption appears to be that since there are technically no native speakers, there can be no reliable linguistic analysis of such “slips” – they are just random mistakes, not worth analysing.

I am not convinced that that is the case; I believe that some users of MSA achieve near-native fluency, and hence develop their own internal grammar, which may not coincide on all points with the formal traditional grammar of fuṣḥà. Such error patterns thus become significant, revealing something about the speaker’s internal grammar.

Can anyone help me to find a reliable and searchable corpus of spontaneous oral MSA Arabic (either in Arabic script or in transcription) which has not been edited for such “mistakes”. Al-Jazeera post transcripts of some of their live talk shows in which numerous non-MSA items (šū, mā fīš, dil-wa’ti, etc.) are faithfully reproduced, but I am not certain that wāħid: ’an yakūn ladēk hadafan would not be edited to a more “correct” wāħid: ’an yakūn ladēk hadaf.

Many thanks,

Steve Hewitt

s.hewitt <at> unesco.org

 




Getting to Zero : Zero New HIV Infections. Zero Discrimination and Zero AIDS Related Deaths

Objectif zéro : Zéro nouvelle infection à VIH. Zéro discrimination. Zéro décès lié au SIDA

WORLD AIDS DAY 2011
http://www.unesco.org/aids

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--
Emad Soliman Ali Mohamed 
aka Emad Nawfal (عماد نوفل)
PhD in Linguistics, Computational Linguistics Track,
Department of Linguistics,
Indiana University, Bloomington
http://jones.ling.indiana.edu/~emadnawfal

Attachment (findFalseAccusatives.py): text/x-python, 1248 bytes
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Anna Kazantseva | 1 Dec 21:20 2011
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CFP: NAACL 2012 Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Literature

Call for Papers

Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Literature

Co-located with

The 2012 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics:
Human Language Technologies

June 7 or 8, 2012

Montréal, Québec, Canada

All information, including announcements and updates, can be found on the workshop's Web site:

https://sites.google.com/site/clfl2012/

MOTIVATION AND SCOPE

The amount of literary material available on-line keeps growing rapidly. Not only are there
machine-readable texts in libraries, collections and e-book stores, but there is also more and more
“live” literature – e-zines, blogs, self-published e-books and so on. There is a need for tools to
help users navigate, visualize and appreciate high volume of available literature.

Literary texts are quite different from technical and formal documents, which have been the focus of NLP
research thus far. Most forms of statistical language processing rely on lexical information in one way
or another. In literature, the primary mode is narrative rather than exposition. Stories may be
cognitively easier to read than certain expository genres, such as scientific documents, but it is a
challenging form of discourse for NLP tools and methods. For instance, literary prose lacks overt
lexical clues and structural markers typically leveraged in the processing of more structured genres.
Also, even conventional literary texts exhibit far less unity of time, space and topic than most formal
discourse. Learning to handle these challenges in literary data may help move past heavy reliance on
surface clues in general.

Literature also differs from other genres because of the needs of its typical audience. For instance,
reading, searching or browsing literature online is a different task than searching for the latest news
on a particular topic. Search criteria would be rather abstract: not a keyword, but a literary style,
similarity to another work, point of view and so on. When looking for a summary or a digest, a reader may
prefer to know or visualize a text's broad characteristics than facts which summarize the plot.

We invite papers that touch upon these areas, but also welcome other ideas which promote the processing of
literary narrative or related forms of discourse.

TOPICS OF INTEREST

Note: Papers on other closely related topics will also be considered

* the needs of the readers and how those needs translate into meaningful NLP tasks;
* searching for literature;
* recommendation systems for literature;
* computational modelling of narratives, computational narratology;
* summarization of literature;
* differences between literature and other genres as relevant to computational linguistics;
* discourse structure in literature;
* emotion analysis for literature;
* profiling and authorship attribution;
* identification and analysis of literature genres;
* building and analysing social networks of characters;
* generation of literary narrative, dialogue or poetry;
* modelling dialogue literary style for generation.

SUBMISSION

We invite submission of long and short papers, describing completed or ongoing research on systems,
studies, theories and models which can inform the area of computational linguistics for literature.
Long papers should be at most 8 pages, plus unlimited space for references. Short papers should be at most 4
pages plus references, and can be appropriate for either oral or poster presentation. Accepted long
papers, and perhaps selected short papers, will be presented as talks. In addition, we encourage
submission of position papers -- mapping out research ideas and programs -- of up to 6 pages plus references.

There will be double-blind review: submissions must be anonymized.

Style files and sample PDFs are available on this page:

http://www.naaclhlt2012.org/conference/conference.php

Submission page:  please visit later

IMPORTANT DATES (all deadlines 11:59 pm. Hawaii Time)

Submission deadline: February 20, 2012
Notification of acceptance: March 23, 2012
Camera-ready version due: April 10, 2012
Workshop: June 7 or June 8, 2012

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

* Cecilia Ovesdotter Alm (Rochester Institute of Technology)
* Nicholas Dames (Columbia University)
* Hal Daumé III (University of Maryland)
* Anna Feldman (Montclair State University)
* Mark Finlayson (MIT)
* Pablo Gervás (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
* Roxana Girju (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
* Amit Goyal (University of Maryland)
* Katherine Havasi (MIT Media Lab)
* Matthew Jockers (Stanford University)
* James Lester (North Carolina State University)
* Inderjeet Mani (Children's Organization of Southeast Asia)
* Kathy McKeown (Columbia University)
* Saif Mohammad (National Research Council, Canada)
* Vivi Nastase (HITS gGmbH)
* Rebecca Passonneau (Columbia University)
* Livia Polanyi (LDM Associates)
* Owen Rambow (Columbia University)
* Michaela Regneri (Saarland University)
* Reid Swanson (University of California, Santa Cruz)
* Marilyn Walker (University of California, Santa Cruz)
* Janice Wiebe (University of Pittsburgh)

CO-ORGANIZERS

* David Elson  (Google)
* Anna Kazantseva (University of Ottawa)
* Rada Mihalcea (University of North Texas)
* Stan Szpakowicz (University of Ottawa)

CONTACT INFORMATION

Send general inquiries to clfl.workshop <at> gmail.com

Anna Kazantseva
Ph.D. Candidate
University of Ottawa
School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

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Rich Cooper | 2 Dec 04:51 2011

Re: Language Acquisition

Dear David,

 

You wrote:

Maybe there will be a day when AI's rational agents can feel peer pressure, can feel 'face' and loss of 'face', the urge to be a member of a social group, a day when an AI rational agent draws its very identity from the 'culture' it 'belongs to', (or, for that matter, can feel an identity of any sort) and can 'feel' the high 'personal' (robotic?) stakes of stepping out of that cultural identity to risk entry into a different one, risk being rejected, experience being excluded or admitted to that 'speech community' based on ones competence in using another language. (To me, these human attributes are central rather than peripheral to explanations of (2nd) language learning.) When that day comes, when AI's rational agents can be designed with those attributes, then I'll be the first to want them in my R&D team developing language learning technologies. Until then, where are the anthropologists (and where are the....(fill in the blank; who else do we need to join in our efforts?)!

 

Your point is well taken; that embedded, situated, rational agent could learn a language (English?) and then copies of the program and its learned data and processes could be made.  That would create ubiquitous agents for every conceivable task that requires English and can fit within the bounds of what was first learned.  The first agent so constructed might have limited capability in vocabulary, syntax, semantics, and practical uses. 

 

The ability to “feel” as you put it could be simulated using theories drawn from psychological and sociological research information. 

 

The ability to acquire new words, syntax and semantics would likely follow in the third tier of agents, at least to a practical and pragmatic extent needed to build a tier of learning agent copies. 

 

Your insights as a language teacher are very useful, and certainly aren’t well represented in current or past linguistics research, at least as I am aware of. 

 

Thanks,

-Rich

 

Sincerely,

Rich Cooper

EnglishLogicKernel.com

Rich AT EnglishLogicKernel DOT com

9 4 9 \ 5 2 5 - 5 7 1 2

From: corpora-bounces <at> uib.no [mailto:corpora-bounces <at> uib.no] On Behalf Of David Wible
Sent: Sunday, November 20, 2011 10:28 PM
To: Mark Lybrand
Cc: corpora
Subject: Re: [Corpora-List] Language Acquisition

 

Mark mentions the possibility of AI-spawned rational agents contributing to the design of language learning technologies. Let me say something about that, at least wrt second language acquisition/learning. (Sorry this is ignoring Mark's original question. And what follows is not at all aimed at Mark.)

To me, the current area in which to look for breakthroughs in language acquisition research (at least the kind that hopes to be relevant to educators in trying to foster language acquisition) is research that enriches the scope of contextual factors that matter to situated, human learners, not research that further decontextualizes its 'models' of learning (scrubbing them clean of the messy variables that muck up the research design). In my experience, the most lamentable aspect of efforts to create 'assistive technologies for learners' is the development of such technologies in sanitized, lab-like conditions (or in the sanitized conditions of certain technologists' own minds) without the benefit of any front-line classroom experience with living, breathing learners or teachers (or parents or administrators). I have spent a hefty chunk of my academic life trying to develop technologies that assist in language learning, so I'm all for it. But my own quirky main conclusion from all these years is that the stuff which is designed and made in 'idealized' conditions is often hopelessly detached from what would take hold in actual learning ecologies, and because of that, it won't 'scale up' beyond the stage of lab toys). What portion of teachers who allow their students to be used as subjects in testing out these technologies are glad when it's over and, short of coercion, would never touch the stuff again . R&D efforts in language learning technology, need from the earliest stages, more 'anthropologists' and 'ethnographers' and teachers from the 'trenches' where the technologies are hoping to make a contribution, not more decontextualized, sanitized models of language acquisition.

Maybe there will be a day when AI's rational agents can feel peer pressure, can feel 'face' and loss of 'face', the urge to be a member of a social group, a day when an AI rational agent draws its very identity from the 'culture' it 'belongs to', (or, for that matter, can feel an identity of any sort) and can 'feel' the high 'personal' (robotic?) stakes of stepping out of that cultural identity to risk entry into a different one, risk being rejected, experience being excluded or admitted to that 'speech community' based on ones competence in using another language. (To me, these human attributes are central rather than peripheral to explanations of (2nd) language learning.) When that day comes, when AI's rational agents can be designed with those attributes, then I'll be the first to want them in my R&D team developing language learning technologies. Until then, where are the anthropologists (and where are the....(fill in the blank; who else do we need to join in our efforts?)!

Sorry to ramble.

David Wible,
NationalCentralUniversity
Taiwan

On Mon, Nov 21, 2011 at 12:19 PM, Mark Lybrand <mlybrand <at> gmail.com> wrote:

Okay, so this is probably not a "corpora" issue.  Forgive me please, as I am an NLP piker.  The question that is plaguing me right now is if there is any research in using AI to mimic language acquistion.  Rather, have there been attempts made to create a rational agent that uses typical human strategies to learn a new language. It would seem that such an approach could be helpful in creating assistive technologies for learners of a foreign language.  Can you guys steer me in the right direction?

Thanks. Feel free to just ignore me altogether if this is completely OT.

--
Mark :)

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Michihiro Kobayakawa | 2 Dec 04:56 2011
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Re: [SIGMM] AdMIRe 2012 ( <at> WWW 2012)

星先生
 
次年度は,フランス リオンでの会議です。
 
小早川 倫広

2011年11月29日4:13 Markus Schedl <markus.schedl-ysZQSVVG0pU@public.gmane.org>:
[Apologies for cross-posting.]


Dear colleagues,

I am happy to announce that the AdMIRe 2012: 4th Int'l Workshop on Advances in Music Information Research (http://www.cp.jku.at/conferences/admire2012) will be held in conjunction with the 21st Int'l World Wide Web Conference (http://www2012.org) in Lyon, France. AdMIRe will take place on April 17, 2012.

Please find below the Call-for-Papers.

Best regards,
Markus Schedl



---------------
Call for Papers
---------------

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++ AdMIRe 2012: 4th International Workshop on     ++
++ Advances in Music Information Research         ++
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

http://www.cp.jku.at/conferences/AdMIRe2012

in Conjunction with the
21st International World Wide Web Conference
Lyon, France, April 16-20, 2012

Date of the Workshop: April 17, 2012


The International Workshop on Advances in Music Information Research (AdMIRe)
serves as a forum for theoretical and practical discussions of cutting edge
research on Web technologies for music information research. Topics covered
include Web mining for music information extraction, retrieval, and
recommendation as well as mobile applications and services that make use of
Web 2.0 technology. Submissions addressing concrete implementations of systems
and services by both academic institutions and industrial companies are also
welcome.


Topics of Interest:
-------------------
+ Music Information Systems
+ Multimodal User Interfaces
+ User Modeling, Personalization, Music Recommendation
+ Context-aware and Mobile Music Information Retrieval
+ Music in the Cloud
+ Web Mining and Information Extraction
+ Collaborative Tags, Social Media Mining, (Social) Network Analysis
+ Semantic Content Analysis and Music Indexing
+ Hybrid Approaches using Context and Content
+ Large-Scale Music Similarity Measurement, Scalability Issues and Solutions
+ Evaluation, Mining of Ground Truth and Data Collections
+ Semantic Web, Linked Data, Ontologies, Semantics and Reasoning
+ Mining and Analysis of Music Video Clips, Music-Related Images and Artwork



Program Chairs:
---------------
Markus Schedl      Dept. of Computational Perception, JKU Linz, Austria
Peter Knees        Dept. of Computational Perception, JKU Linz, Austria
Òscar Celma        Gracenote, Emeryville, CA, USA


Program Committee (Confirmed):
------------------------------
Stephan Baumann    German Research Center for AI, Kaiserslautern, Germany
Dmitry Bogdanov    Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain
Ching-Wei Chen     Gracenote, Emeryville, CA, USA
Mehdi Elahi        University of Bolzano-Bozen, Italy
Arthur Flexer      Austrian Research Institute for AI, Vienna, Austria
Masataka Goto      AIST, Tsukuba, Japan
Fabien Gouyon      Inst. for Systems and Computer Eng. of Porto, Portugal
Ian Knopke         BBC, London, UK
Paul Lamere        the echonest, Davis Square, Somerville, MA, USA
Matthias Mauch     last.fm, London, UK
Mitsunori Ogihara  University of Miami, FL, USA
Dominik Schnitzer  Austrian Research Institute for AI, Vienna, Austria
Steve Tjoa         Imagine Research, San Francisco, CA, USA
Julián Urbano      University Carlos III of Madrid, Spain
Arjen de Vries     Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Jun Wang           Dolby Laboratories, Beijing, P.R. China
Geraint Wiggins    Queen Mary University of London, UK



Important Dates:
----------------
Full Paper Submission       January 13, 2012
Notification of Results     January 29, 2012
Camera Ready Submission     March 1, 2012


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++ http://www.cp.jku.at/conferences/AdMIRe2012  ++
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++




--
*******************************************
Dr. Markus Schedl
Assistant Professor
Department of Computational Perception
Johannes Kepler University Linz
Altenberger Strasse 69
A-4040 Linz, Austria

Tel:  +43 732 2468 1512
Fax:  +43 732 2468 1520
Mail: markus.schedl-ysZQSVVG0pU@public.gmane.org

http://www.cp.jku.at/people/schedl
*******************************************
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Gaël Dias | 1 Dec 19:39 2011
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[CFP] TextGraphs-7 Workshop associated to ACL 2012

======================================================================
                           CALL FOR PAPERS

    TextGraphs-7: Graph-based Methods for Natural Language Processing
                   (http://www.textgraphs.org/ws12)

                           Special Theme:
    Understanding and Mining Social Media Using Graphs: Information
                 Propagation in Blogs and Tweets

                       Workshop of ACL 2012

             July 12, 2012, Jeju, Republic of Korea

               Submission dealdine: March 18, 2012
========================================================================

(1) Workshop Description
(2) Workshop Submissions
(3) Important Dates
(4) Author Instructions
(5) Invited Speaker
(6) Poster Session
(7) Workshop Organisers
(8) Program Committee
(9) Contacts

==================================================
(1) Workshop Description
==================================================

Recent years have shown an increased interest in integrating various
aspects of the field of Graph Theory (GT) into Natural Language
Processing (NLP). Many language phenomena can be naturally put into
graph-based representations and in the last 5 years a significant
number of NLP applications adopted efficient and elegant solutions from
graph theoretical frameworks. These applications range from part-of-
speech tagging, word sense disambiguation, ontology learning and
parsing to information extraction, semantic role assignment,
summarization and sentiment analysis to name but a few. The emergence
of new fields of research focusing on the social media such as Twitter
and Facebook brought the graph-based methods even more into focus. In
particular, graph-based algorithms are used to explore social network
connections and propagation of information in those networks in
addition to exploring the connections between the language entities. As
a consequence, many new applications have been emerging such as rumor
proliferation, e-reputation, multiple identity detection, language
dynamics learning and future events prediction to name but a few.
TextGraphs-7 aims to bring together researchers interested in GT
applied to NLP and provide an environment for further integration of
graph-based solutions into NLP tasks. The workshop also encourages
discussions about theoretical justifications from GT that explain
empirical results obtained in the NLP community. As a consequence, a
deeper understanding of new theories of graph-based algorithms is
likely to help to create new approaches and widen the usage of graphs
for NLP applications.

=================================================
(2) Workshop Submissions
=================================================

TextGraphs-7 will invite innovative submissions on the following, but
not limited to, three main topics:

Topic I: Graph-based methods for Information Retrieval, Information
Extraction and Text Mining
- Graph-based methods for word sense disambiguation,
- Graph-based representations for ontology learning,
- Graph-based strategies for semantic relations identification,
- Encoding semantic distances in graphs,
- Graph-based techniques for document navigation and visualization,
- and more subtopics;

Topic II: New graph-based methods for NLP applications
- Random walk methods in graphs,
- Spectral graph clustering,
- Semi-supervised graph-based methods,
- Methods and analyses for statistical networks,
- Small world graphs,
- Dynamic graph representations ,
- Topological and pretopological analysis of graphs,
- and more subtopics;

Topic III: Graph-based methods for applications on social networks
- Rumor proliferation,
- E-reputation,
- Multiple identity detection,
- Language dynamics studies,
- Surveillance systems,
- and more subtopics.

======================================================
(3) Important Dates
======================================================

Submission deadline: March 18, 2012
Notification of Acceptance: April 15, 2012
Camera-ready deadline: April 30, 2012
Workshop: July 12, 2012

====================================================
(4) Authors Instructions
====================================================

Submissions will consist of (1) regular full papers of maximum 8 pages
(for well established research), (2) regular short papers of maximum 4
pages (for on-going research), (3) position papers of maximum 4 pages
(for prospective ideas) and (4) demo papers of maximum 4 pages (for
software and architectures). One extra page will be accepted for the
Reference section for all submissions’ types.

Textgraphs-7 will have a blind review policy. In order to facilitate
blind reviewing, the authors should omit their names and affiliations
from the paper. Furthermore, all self-references that may reveal the
author identity must be avoided. Papers that do not conform to these
requirements will be rejected without review.

All submissions must be in PDF format and must be formatted using the
ACL 2012 Style Files available a http://www.acl2012.org/call/sub01.asp.

Papers should be submitted to the START Conference Manager available at
the following url: https://www.softconf.com/acl2012/textgraphs-7/.

=======================================================
(5) Invited Speaker
=======================================================

TextGraphs-7 will have the pleasure to invite Lada Adamic to present
her work on information propagation in blogs and tweets. Lada Adamic is
an associate professor in the School of Information at the University
of Michigan Ann Arbor. She is also affiliated with the Center for the
Study of Complex Systems and the Electrical Engineering and Computer
Science Department. Her research interests center on information
dynamics in networks: how information diffuses, how it can be found,
and how it influences the evolution of a network's structure. She
worked previously in Hewlett-Packard's Information Dynamics Lab. Her
projects have included identifying expertise in online question and
answer forums, studying the dynamics of viral marketing, and
characterizing the structure in blogs and other online communities. She
recently received the 10 years best paper award from the ACM/IEEE/WIC
Conference 2011.

==================================================
(6) Poster Session
==================================================

Authors of accepted papers and demos will be able to present their work
on a poster in addition to the oral presentation. The posters will be
displayed in the workshop room all day and there will be a short poster
session in the workshop schedule.

==================================================
(7) Workshop Organisers
==================================================

Ahmed Hassan
Microsoft Research, Redmond, WA, United States
Phone: +14257222849,
Email: hassanam <at> microsoft.com

Gaël Dias
University of Caen Basse-Normandie, Caen, France
Phone: +33231567487
Email: gael.dias <at> unicaen.fr

Irina Matveeva
Dieselpoint Inc., Chicago, United States
Phone: +17737047852
Email: imatveeva <at> dieselpoint.com

==================================================
(8) Program Committee
==================================================

Aitor Soroa, University of the Basque Country, Spain
Alessandro Moschitti, University of Trento, Italy
Animesh Mukherjee, ISI Foundation, Italy
Antoine Widlöcher, University of Caen Basse-Normandie, France
Arzucan Özgür, Istanbul University, Turkey
Bruno Crémilleux, University of Caen Basse-Normandie, France
Chris Biemann, Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany
Dragomir Radev, University of Michigan, USA
Fabio Massimo Zanzotto, University of Rome, Italy
Gina-Anne Levow, University of Washington, USA
Guillaume Cleuziou, University of Orléans, France
Michael Gamon, Microsoft Research, USA
Patrik Pantel, Microsoft Research, USA
Paul Tarau, University of North Texas, USA
Philippe Muller, Paul Sabatier University, France
Rada Mihalcea, University of North Texas, USA
Swapna Somasundaran, Siemens Corporate Research, USA
Torsten Zesch, Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany
Uwe Quasthoff, University of Leipzig, Germany
Zornitsa Kozareva, ISI, University of Southern California, USA

====================================================
(9) Workshop Contacts
====================================================

For any question, please email us at textgraphs2012 <at> gmail.com or look
at the web site http://www.textgraphs.org/ws12

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Jens Lehmann | 1 Dec 16:44 2011
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Re: [NLP2RDF] Announcement: NLP Interchange Format (NIF) 1.0 Spec, Demo and Reference Implementation


Hello,

Am 30.11.2011 23:39, schrieb sowa <at> bestweb.net:
> RDF is the world's most outlandishly bloated way of expressing triples.
> IBM did not adopt it for Watson, Google never adopted it, Facebook never
> adopted it, Amazon never adopted it. Apple never adopted RDF, and they
> trounced Nokia, who poured millions of euros into research on the
> Semantic Web.
>
> Even the W3C has backed off from using RDF by promoting RDFa, whose only
> resemblance to RDF is in the three lettters R D F.  Programmers are
> rapidly migrating away from RDF to notations such as JSON, which is
> basically LISP with curly braces.
>
> At this late date, why would anybody working on NLP adopt a  notation
> that all the major web companies abandoned or rejected?

Are you talking about RDF/XML syntax specifically? Otherwise, you are 
comparing apples and oranges, since RDF can be serialised in different 
formats like Turtle.

IBM Watson does use some background knowledge from the Web of Data 
(DBpedia). Google Shopping uses it (http://purl.org/goodrelations/). 
Facebook has OpenGraph (http://ogp.me/). I don't want to argue this 
point here as everyone has different opinions on the popularity of RDF 
and there are certain weaknesses, but just point out that there are less 
bloated ways than RDF/XML to express RDF triples.

Kind regards,

Jens

--

-- 
Dr. Jens Lehmann
Head of AKSW/MOLE group, University of Leipzig
Homepage: http://www.jens-lehmann.org
GPG Key: http://jens-lehmann.org/jens_lehmann.asc

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KC Wong | 1 Dec 16:08 2011
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Posting a message to Corpora

Dear Corpora Owner,
 
Please could you post the following message of mine to your Corpora mailing list?
 

Dear Corpora Members,  I am looking for spoken Chinese corpora for my research. So I would really appreciate if you can provide me with any such clue.  Best regards, Kwong Cheong Wong

 

Thanks.

 

Kwong Cheong Wong

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Gmane