Rob Freeman | 1 Aug 03:46 2007

Re: Chomsky and computational linguistics

On 8/1/07, Mike Maxwell <maxwell <at> umiacs.umd.edu> wrote:

Rob Freeman wrote:
> Now, to Chomsky that meant something in the mind of a native speaker
>  must select between them.
>
> I don't think that hypothesis panned out.

Why not?

This is the "50 years is a long time" thing.

Or course, that one hit innate solution may be around the corner. But we've turned a lot of corners.

There is also now quite a large body of work bearing out just how important all the detail is. Not least corpus linguistics, but also Functional and Cognitive linguistics. They all started from different positions, and there has been a general movement to the importance of usage and detail.

When you think about it Functional and Cognitive linguistics started out as far apart as you can imagine. Functionalism was close to behaviorism and denied mental reality. Cognitivism was just a branch of Universal Grammar and probably the most extreme statement of the anti-behaviorist position. Now we have some consensus, and the consensus is that detail matters.

And there is also the fact that if you explain the data another way, you simply don't need to posit an innate selection mechanism any more.

> However there is another way to interpret the same data. Same data,
> different conclusion.
>
> To me the fact we get many grammars from the same set of observations
>  (observational insufficiency) means they are all good, and we need
> to keep the observations so we can find the one we need, when we need
> it.

If they all fit the observations thus far, how would we choose among
them?

It is not a problem in practice. Take the one which best answers the question you want answered at any given moment. Is "black" in the same class as "strong"? Check if your context is "coffee" or "cloud".

It is only a problem when we try to squash all the grammars into one. When we do that we get something very much like the randomness of a statistical grammar, because sometimes "black" is the same as "strong", and sometimes it isn't.

-Rob
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Rob Freeman | 1 Aug 07:04 2007

Re: Chomsky and computational linguistics

On 8/1/07, Mike Maxwell <maxwell <at> umiacs.umd.edu> wrote:

...I don't think most generativists would argue against the idea
that usage is part of language.  They (and I) would just say that
structure is what usage has to deal with, just like twenty amino acids
and 64 base pairs are what cells have to deal with.

I agree. I'm not arguing against "structure" at all.

I think the debate in linguistics has for too long been polarized into this structure vs. function/meaning thing. That is one lasting bad result of Chomsky's strong personality.

In fact a rejection of structure was just one response to observational insufficiency (as Universal Grammar was another.) If we can explain the "observational insufficiency" of language structure in other ways there is no need for us to make a big distinction any more between structural descriptions and functional or cognitive descriptions.

As I say, Functional and Cognitive linguistics are in many ways much stranger bedfellows.

>     If they all fit the observations thus far, how would we choose among
>     them?
>
> It is not a problem in practice. Take the one which best answers the
> question you want answered at any given moment. Is "black" in the same
> class as "strong"? Check if your context is "coffee" or "cloud".

I would call that an issue of semantics, and that it's possible to tease
apart syntax and semantics...

I'm sure that's how Generativism deals with this kind of thing. But once Generativism has redefined it out of syntax and satisfactorily washed its hands of the dirty thing, where does that leave poor old semantics?

Anyway, I wasn't presenting this as a problem, but a solution, a solution for how to select between grammars. Notice it solved the problem you presented. I'd rather not redefine my solution out of syntax, thanks. If it turns out not to be a problem, but actually a solution, can keep it in syntax? :-)

If you're wondering what syntax has to do with the case of 'black', then
ask what "context" means.

Coffee drunk in Ethiopia is black.
Which coffee is better served black?
Clouds with silver linings are never as big as those which are black.

I wasn't wondering! I certainly believe we can characterize the properties of "black" as syntactic. Indeed, I think that is a good thing to do.

But I must have missed something in your examples. What are you demonstrating?

-Rob
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Li-Wu Chen | 1 Aug 03:39 2007
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extended deadline (August 5th): ISWC workshop OntoLex07 - From Text to Knowledge: The Lexicon/Ontology Interface

** extended deadline August 5th **
[Please accept our apology for duplicate posting.]

Call for papers for OntoLex07 - From Text to Knowledge: The
Lexicon/Ontology Interface

http://olp.dfki.de/OntoLex07/

Workshop at ISWC07, the 6th International Semantic Web Conference
(http://iswc2007.semanticweb.org/)
November 11th , 2007
Busan, South-Korea

Endorsed by SIGSEM (Association of Computational Linguistics SIG on
Computational Semantics http://www.aclweb.org/sigsem) and the NEON
project (http://www.neon-project.org/)
And in coordination with the ISO Working Group on Language Resource
Management (http://www.tc37sc4.org/)

The OntoLex workshop series is concerned with the interface between
knowledge representation in ontologies and the representation and use of
linguistic knowledge as encoded in (multilingual) lexicons. Previous
OntoLex workshops were held in Sozopol (2000), Las Palmas (2002), Lisboa
(2004), Jeju (2005), Genoa (2006). The extraction of ontology elements
from textual data is a pre-requisite for many Semantic Web applications.
Hence the interface between ontologies (describing objects in a domain)
and the lexicon (describing the linguistic features of terms that refer
to such objects) is becoming increasingly important. We invite
submission of papers on the following topics in this interdisciplinary
research area:

The lexicon/ontology interface
* Design principles for the integrated representation of lexical and
ontological knowledge
* The lexicon/ontology interface in multilingual and cross-cultural
aspects of ontologies

The lexicon in Semantic Web applications
* The role of (multilingual) lexicons in knowledge markup and ontology
population, i.e. in ontology-based information extraction from text
* Lexical aspects in ontology learning from text, i.e. in (multilingual)
term extraction, relation extraction, etc.
* Lexical approaches to ontology matching, i.e. in the extraction,
representation and use of synonyms for mapping between class/property
labels
* Reengineering lexicons as ontologies, e.g. porting wordnets and
framenets to the Semantic Web

Ontologies in knowledge-based Natural Language Processing
* Ontological constraints on lexicon development for knowledge-based NLP
* Ontologies as resources for NLP-based tasks (question answering,
document classification, text mining, expert search, etc.)

Important Dates
August 5, 2007: Submission Deadline - extended
September 1, 2007: Notification
October 1, 2007: Camera-ready Version
November 11, 2007: Workshop

Submission
Papers must be in English, not exceed 10 pages and should be formatted
in LNCS style (Springer format for Lecture Notes in Computer Science
series). For complete details, see Springer's Author Instructions
(http://www.springer.com). Papers must be submitted electronically
through the conference submission site
(https://cmt.research.microsoft.com/ISWC2007/)

Organizing Committee
Paul Buitelaar, Competence Center Semantic Web - DFKI, Germany
Key-Sun Choi, Semantic Web Research Center - KAIST, South-Korea
Aldo Gangemi, Laboratory for Applied Ontology - CNR, Italy
Chu-Ren Huang, Institute of Linguistics - Academia Sinica, Taiwan
Alessandro Oltramari, Cogito S.r.l., Italy

Program Committee
Timothy Baldwin, University of Melbourne, Australia
John Bateman, University of Bremen, Germany
Philipp Cimiano, Karlsruhe University, Germany
Nigel Collier, National Institute of Informatics, Japan
Shu-Kai Hsieh, National I-Lan University, Taiwan
Asanee Kawtrakul, Kasetsart University, Thailand
Atanas Kiryakov, Ontotext, Bulgaria
Kiyong Lee, Korea University, South-Korea
Alessandro Lenci, University of Pisa, Italy
Sujian Li, Peking University, China
Marjorie McShane, University of Maryland, USA
Martha Palmer, University of Colorado, USA
Robert Porzel, University of Bremen, Germany
Laurent Prévot, University of Toulouse, France
Lu Qin, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China
Kiril Simov, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria
Armando Stellato, University of Rome, Italy
Tokunaga Takenobu, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan
Jun Ichi Tsuji, Tokyo University, Japan
Paola Velardi, University of Rome, Italy
Johanna Voelker, Karlsruhe University, Germany
Chris Welty, IBM, USA

Workshop Registration
All workshop participants must register for ISWC 2007
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Steve Finch | 1 Aug 11:14 2007

Re: Chomsky and computational linguistics

OK, now I can't resist....

Mike Maxwell wrote:
> Rob Freeman wrote:
> > However there is another way to interpret the same data. Same data,
> > different conclusion.
> >
> > To me the fact we get many grammars from the same set of observations
> >  (observational insufficiency) means they are all good, and we need
> > to keep the observations so we can find the one we need, when we need
> > it.
>
> If they all fit the observations thus far, how would we choose among
> them?  Unless you mean that I might control a number of dialects, and
> can turn one or another on to make a point, or to make a joke.  (And in
> fact, I might could.)  I doubt that most linguists (generative or
> otherwise) would take issue with you on that.

When we admit that there are multiple "structures" in language, each of which 
might have something interesting to say about language, the raft of arguments 
that Chomsky, Fodor et al originally proposed that essentially say that not 
*all* tranformational syntactic structure can be empirically inferred (woe 
betide theoretical physics, btw, for they have a yet harder problem without 
innate guidance) begins to crumble.  If we don't have to understand *all* of 
language in one go, then arguments that say "you might be able to get X that 
way, but what about Y and Z" can be countered by "I'll get Y and Z later, 
maybe when I have more advanced techniques that you or I haven't thought of 
yet, but right now I'm interested in X".

And then we can say without controversy that there is a *lot* of structure in 
language that can evidently be - and has demonstrably been - found 
empirically.

And in general I would say ask not what engineering can do for theory, but 
rather what theory can do for engineering.  The huge silence in this list on 
the latter point speaks volumes.

- Steve.

On Tuesday 31 July 2007 23:42, Mike Maxwell wrote:
> Rob Freeman wrote:
> > Now, to Chomsky that meant something in the mind of a native speaker
> >  must select between them.
> >
> > I don't think that hypothesis panned out.
>
> Why not?  (Of course, it's possible that there's really only one grammar
> that gets selected or built in the mind by a sufficient quantity of
> data.  Heaven knows it's difficult enough to approach observational
> adequacy, so coming up with one observationally adequate grammar may be
> harder than Chomsky realized in the beginning.)
>
> > However there is another way to interpret the same data. Same data,
> > different conclusion.
> >
> > To me the fact we get many grammars from the same set of observations
> >  (observational insufficiency) means they are all good, and we need
> > to keep the observations so we can find the one we need, when we need
> > it.
>
> If they all fit the observations thus far, how would we choose among
> them?  Unless you mean that I might control a number of dialects, and
> can turn one or another on to make a point, or to make a joke.  (And in
> fact, I might could.)  I doubt that most linguists (generative or
> otherwise) would take issue with you on that.

--

-- 
Steven Finch
Daxtra Technologies
Tel: +44 (0)131 653 1250
Email: s.finch <at> daxtra.com

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"Christiane Hümmer" | 1 Aug 19:39 2007
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Picon

looking for German-French parallel corpus

Dear list members,

I am looking for freely accessible German-French parallel corpora. 
Can anybody give me a hint?

Thanks a lot,

Christiane Hümmer
--

-- 
Psssst! Schon vom neuen GMX MultiMessenger gehört?
Der kanns mit allen: http://www.gmx.net/de/go/multimessenger

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Re: looking for German-French parallel corpus

Christiane,

Have you ever thought about using versions of Bible like
parallel corpus?
It seems to me that European Parliament ( http://www.europarl.europa.eu/) has texts translated to several languages and could be used like a parallel corpus too.

Regards,

Carlos Menezes

On 8/1/07, "Christiane Hümmer" <C.Huemmer <at> gmx.net> wrote:
Dear list members,

I am looking for freely accessible German-French parallel corpora.
Can anybody give me a hint?

Thanks a lot,

Christiane Hümmer
--
Psssst! Schon vom neuen GMX MultiMessenger gehört?
Der kanns mit allen: http://www.gmx.net/de/go/multimessenger

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Germán Sanchis Trilles | 1 Aug 23:04 2007
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Re: looking for German-French parallel corpus

Hi Christiane, and everybody else.

Take a look at the EuroParl corpus, I think it might be what you are  
looking for:

http://www.statmt.org/europarl/

Else, you can also take a look into the OPUS corpus:

http://logos.uio.no/opus/
(I seem to remember it has also parallel corpora for the pair German-French)

Or even at the JRC Acquis corpus:

http://langtech.jrc.it/JRC-Acquis.html

Good luck with your research :)

Germán Sanchis

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Rob Freeman | 2 Aug 03:35 2007

Re: Chomsky and computational linguistics

I agree totally Steve. Can I just add a comment. Maybe you see this already, but in case anyone is missing it. I want to emphasize that the solution may be even closer than saying "I'll get Y and Z later, maybe when I have more advanced techniques."

I think we can get whichever we want of X, Y, and Z, right now. The essential missing insight is that we just have to understand we can't get them all at once. Not all in one, internally consistent, grammar, anyway.

We can't get them all in one internally consistent grammar because X means interpreting the data one way, and Y, and Z mean interpreting it in other ways, ways which may actually contradict X when looked at globally (though not locally): e.g. "black" is similar to "strong", but "black" is also _not_ similar to "strong".

I don't think the problem has been our techniques, which have been good for 50 years or more (until Chomsky noticed they gave multiple inconsistent results.) The problem has been our goals. If we change our goal from that of finding one complete grammar (and the functional, cognitive guys are just as guilty of this, not to mention the engineers and machine learning guys), to that of selecting (at will) between many possible inconsistent grammars, we can solve syntax now (and reconcile it with semantics, function, usage... etc.)

-Rob

On 8/1/07, Steve Finch <s.finch <at> daxtra.com> wrote:
OK, now I can't resist....

Mike Maxwell wrote:
> Rob Freeman wrote:
> > However there is another way to interpret the same data. Same data,
> > different conclusion.
> >
> > To me the fact we get many grammars from the same set of observations
> >  (observational insufficiency) means they are all good, and we need
> > to keep the observations so we can find the one we need, when we need
> > it.
>
> If they all fit the observations thus far, how would we choose among
> them?  Unless you mean that I might control a number of dialects, and
> can turn one or another on to make a point, or to make a joke.  (And in
> fact, I might could.)  I doubt that most linguists (generative or
> otherwise) would take issue with you on that.

When we admit that there are multiple "structures" in language, each of which
might have something interesting to say about language, the raft of arguments
that Chomsky, Fodor et al originally proposed that essentially say that not
*all* tranformational syntactic structure can be empirically inferred (woe
betide theoretical physics, btw, for they have a yet harder problem without
innate guidance) begins to crumble.  If we don't have to understand *all* of
language in one go, then arguments that say "you might be able to get X that
way, but what about Y and Z" can be countered by "I'll get Y and Z later,
maybe when I have more advanced techniques that you or I haven't thought of
yet, but right now I'm interested in X".

And then we can say without controversy that there is a *lot* of structure in
language that can evidently be - and has demonstrably been - found
empirically.

And in general I would say ask not what engineering can do for theory, but
rather what theory can do for engineering.  The huge silence in this list on
the latter point speaks volumes.

- Steve.

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Claude de Loupy | 2 Aug 13:39 2007

Job offer: postdoctoral position at Syllabs, Paris


*****************************************************************************
Research Fellow Position in Information Processing at Syllabs (Paris, France)
*****************************************************************************
(Sorry if cross-posting occurs) 

***************
Job Description  
*************** 

Syllabs is seeking a versatile, highly motivated postdoctoral researcher in the area of NLP and
Information Processing.

The researcher will actively be involved in the development of innovative NLP and information processing
tools with a
clear focus on information extraction (fast information extraction tools merging statistics and
linguistics, lexicon
extraction, etc.). Problem resolution will be essential. The post-doc will also participate in ongoing multi-partner
projects. 

The position is available on a full-time basis for a period of one year and can lead to a permanent position with
supervision of student interns and PhD candidates and a key role in project development (response to
French and EU call
for tenders).

********************
Person Specification
********************

The successful candidate will have the following profile: 

- PhD (or PhD candidate approved for defense) in a relevant area of Computer Science with good knowledge of linguistics
- Experience in one or more of: Information Retrieval, Information Extraction, Ontologies, Statistical
NLP, Machine
Learning, etc.
- Strong programming skills in the following languages: C, C++, Perl
- Programming skills in .NET and Java will be a plus
- Windows and Linux development experience
- Experience with XML

- A strong ability to work effectively and independently and to meet deadlines
- Good communication skills and an ability to work well as part of a team and with academia and industrial partners
- Good report and proposal writing skills

- Fluent in English
- Good knowledge of French (at least good comprehension)
- Other languages will be a plus

Additional desirable attributes:

- Previous participation in multi-partners research projects
- Experience in evaluation of Natural Language Processing tools and resources

*******
Syllabs
*******

Syllabs is a research company specialising in the development of innovative tools for in-depth textual
analyses, using
Natural Language Processing. 
Syllabs specialises in multilingual information processing combining the methods of statistics,
linguistics and
semantics. In addition, Syllabs develops and manages multi-partner research projects associated with
the management and
the intelligent analysis of textual and multimedia information, including projects for the French
National Research
Agency (ANR) and the European Union (search engines, categorisation, text mining, etc.). We also provide consulting
services to clients wishing to better analyze their specific requirements and benefit from NLP tools. 

Syllabs is located in the heart of Paris, France. 
We offer a friendly and professional working atmosphere.

For more information about Syllabs, please visit our website: http://www.syllabs.com/en/

***********
Application 
***********

Applications are welcome to the following address: jobs-at-syllabs.com 
Please join the following materials: 
- detailed CV
- name and address of referees 
- one or more publications
- if possible, your PhD thesis

Deadline: Open immediately until filled. 

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Oto Vale | 2 Aug 15:42 2007
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Programa Geral - VI Encontro de Linguistica de Corpus

(desculpe se receber esta mensagem mais de uma vez)

VI ENCONTRO DE LINGUISTICA DE CORPUS
6  e 7 de setembro de 2007
FACULDADE DE FILOSOFIA LETRAS E CIENCIAS HUMANAS
USP
SÃO PAULO

PROGRAMA GERAL

Dia 6 de setembro
8h : abertura:

8h15 – Conferência de abertura:
Steven Bird (University of Melbourne)
LINGUISTIC DATA CONSORTIUM: AN OVERVIEW (titulo provisório)

9h30 – Intervalo

9h50 – Sessão de comunicações:
9h50 - Eliane Botelho Ferraz-(UFJF), Neusa Salim Miranda-(UFJF): A
REDE METAFÓRICA DA MORALIDADE

10h20 - Tony Berber Sardinha (PUC-SP): METÁFORAS DE LULA SOB A ÓTICA
DA LINGÜÍSTICA DE CORPUS

10h50 - Tania M G Shepherd (UERJ): FEIXES LEXICAIS EM COMPOSIÇÕES
ARGUMENTATIVAS DE APRENDIZES: UM ESTUDO BASEADO EM CORPUS

11h20 - Sonia Zyngier (UFRJ), Vander Viana (PUC-Rio – PG), Natália
Giordani Silveira (UFRJ – G): POR UMA LITERATURA DE CORPUS:
LITERARIEDADE ATRAVÉS DO COMPUTADOR

12h10 às 14h – Almoço

14h às 15h15 – Conferência
Sebastião Carlos Leite Gonçalves (IBILCE- UNESP): PROJETO ALIP
(AMOSTRA LINGÜÍSTICA DO INTERIOR PAULISTA): CONSTITUIÇÃO DE UM BANCO
DE DADOS ANOTADO PARA ESTUDO DO PORTUGUÊS FALADO NO INTERIOR PAULISTA

15h15 às 16h15 – Intervalo e primeira sessão de Pôsteres

16h15 – Sessão de comunicações –
16h15 - Maria da Glória Rocha (UNEB): FALARES ALAGOINHENSES:
CONSTITUIÇÃO DE CORPUS DE LÍNGUA FALADA

16h45 - T. Cristófaro Silva (UFMG), L. Almeida (UFMG), E. Cristiano
(UFMG - IC), M. Negri (UFMG – IC): ASPA E ELABORE : SONORIDADE E
TECNOLOGIA

17h15  - Terry Shortall (University of Birmingham): CORPUS, COGNITION,
CURRICULUM

Dia 7 de setembro

8h às 9h15 – Conferência:
Diana Santos (SINTEF- Oslo/ Linguateca): LINGUÍSTICA/PLN COM CORPORA:
ALGUMAS REFLEXÕES, SALTEADAS DE EXEMPLOS EM PORTUGUÊS

9h15 – Intervalo e segunda sessão de pôsteres

10h15 – Sessão de comunicações.
10h15 - Eliane Maria Raymundo (USP), Marcelo Adriano Amancio (USP),
Valéria Feltrim (UEM), Sandra Maria Aluisio (USP): ANÁLISE DA
ESTRUTURA RETÓRICA DA SEÇÃO SUMÁRIO EXECUTIVO DE PLANO DE NEGÓCIOS

10h45 - Mauro Tadeu Baptista Sobhie (CNPq - LAEL PUC/SP / PG): ANÁLISE
DE COLOCAÇÃO (INTER) TEXTUAL

11h15 - Joel Sossai Coleti (UFSCar), Daniela Ferreira de Mattos
(UFSCar), Luiz Carlos Genoves Jr. (USP - PG), Ariani Di Felippo (UNESP
- PG), Gladis Maria de Barcelos Almeida (UFSCar), Sandra Maria Aluisio
(USP), Osvaldo Novais de Oliveira (USP): COMPILAÇÃO DE CORPUS EM
LÍNGUA PORTUGUESA NA ÁREA DE NANOCIÊNCIA / NANOTECNOLOGIA: PROBLEMAS E
SOLUÇÕES

11h45 - Maria Clara Paixão de Sousa (Unicamp), Fábio Natanael Kepler
(USP -PG): UMA FERRAMENTA INTEGRADA PARA ANOTAÇÃO DE EDIÇÃO E CLASSE
DE PALAVRAS

12h15 às 14h – Almoço

14h às 16h30 – Sessão de comunicações.
14h - Leonardo Zilio (UFRGS): CONTRASTE ALEMÃO-PORTUGUÊS DE
FRASEOLOGIAS ESPECIALIZADAS EM TEXTOS DE CARDIOLOGIA

14h30 - Luciana Carvalho (USP): A TRADUÇÃO DE BINÔMIOS EM CONTRATOS DE
COMMON LAW À LUZ DA LINGÜÍSTICA DE CORPUS

15h - Paula Tavares Pinto Paiva ( UNESP- SJRP- PG), Diva Cardoso de
Camargo (UNESP – SJRP): TRAÇOS DE SIMPLIFICAÇÃO E EXPLICITAÇÃO EM
CORPORA PARALELOS DE TRADUÇÕES MÉDICAS: COMPARAÇÃO ENTRE O TRADUTOR
BRASILEIRO E O TRADUTOR BRITÂNICO

15h30 - Renata Beneduzi (UFRGS – PG): EXTRAÇÃO E CLASSIFICAÇÃO DAS
COLOCAÇÕES A PARTIR DE UM CORPUS DE LÍNGUA ESPANHOLA

16h - Helmara Febeliana Real de Moraes – (USP/PG): O ADVÉRBIO EM
UNIDADES FRASEOLÓGICAS ESPECIALIZADAS: A BUSCA PELA EQUIVALÊNCIA NA
CULINÁRIA E NO DIREITO

16h30 – Intervalo

16h45 às 17h45 – Mesa Redonda Final
Como nos encontros precedentes, o Encerramento se dará com uma Mesa
Redonda na qual são discutidas questões referentes à Linguística de
Corpus e na qual também é realizada uma avaliação do encontro.

--------------

PROGRAMAÇÃO DAS SESSÕES DE APRESENTAÇÃO DE PÔSTERES
(6 e 7 de setembro)

Dia 6 de setembro das 15h15 às 16h15

1.A EXPRESSÃO ANAFÓRICA É VERDADE: UM ESTUDO DE BASE EM CORPUS – Marco
Rocha - UFSC

2.A RESOLUÇÃO DE ANÁFORAS PRONOMINAIS DA LÍNGUA PORTUGUESA COM BASE NO
ALGORITMO DE MITKOV - Amanda Rocha Chaves (UFSCar-PPGCC), Lucia Helena
Machado Rino (UFSCar - PPGCC)

3.O USO METAFÓRICO DO LÉXICO DA MORTE NO PB - Thais  Fernandes Sampaio
(UFJF-PPGLingüística), Neusa Salim Miranda (UFJF)

4.AS METÁFORAS DE LULA E BUSH: UMA ANÁLISE ATRAVÉS DA LINGÜÍSTICA DE
CORPUS - Vivian de Mello Martins Mestriner (PUCSP-PG), Lilian de Mello
Martins (PUCSP- PG)

5.A CONSTRUÇÃO DE UM CORPUS MONOLÍNGÜE PARA O ENSINO DE LÍNGUAS,
TRADUÇÃO E ANÁLISE LINGÜÍSTICA - Nilson Roberto Barros da Silva (UERN)

6.A LEITURA EM LÍNGUA ESTRANGEIRA PARA ÁREAS DE ESPECIALIDADE: O CASO
DO FRANCÊS JURÍDICO - Cláudia Ozon (USP-PG)

7.CONSTITUIÇÃO DE CORPUS DA LÍNGUA DE SINAIS BRASILEIRA: TRANSCRIÇÃO,
PADRONIZAÇÃO DE DADOS E INFORMATIZAÇÃO - Leland E. McCleary (USP),
Evani Viotti (USP), Tarcísio Leite (USP-PG)

8.O USO DAS CARTAS COMO CORPUS PARA PESQUISAS DE VARIAÇÃO E HISTÓRIA
LINGÜÍSTICA - Juliana Bertucci Barbosa (UNESP / PG), Talita de Cássia
Marine (UNESP- / PG)

9.CARACTERIZAÇÃO DA REDE DE TEXTOS ESCRITOS - Silvia Maria Gomes
Caldeira (UFBA - PG)

10.PROJETO: LIVRO DIDÁTICO DE ENSINO DE PORTUGUÊS COMO LÍNGUA
ESTRANGEIRA UTILIZANDO A LINGÜÍSTICA DE CORPUS - Telma de Lurdes São
Bento Ferreira (Lexikos Cursos e Traduções)

11.DA CAUSALIDADE EM QUÍMICA: COESÃO, GÊNEROS TEXTUAIS E ENUNCIAÇÃO
CIENTÍFICA - Maria José Bocorny Finatto (UFRGS), Siane Simioni
(UFRGS), Nara Cornetet Dei Ricardi (UFRGS)

12.DA EXTRAÇÃO DE UNIDADES TERMINOLÓGICAS (UT) À GERAÇÃO DE GLOSSÁRIOS
ESPECIALIZADOS - Mary Lourdes de Oliveira Angotti (UnB)

13.AVALIAÇÃO DE ALINHADORES TEXTUAIS SOB PERSPECTIVA DO USUÁRIO
LINGÜISTA - Danilo Nogueira Marra (UFRGS), Maria José Bocorny Finatto
(UFRGS)

14.COMPILAÇÃO DE CORPORA ESPECIALIZADOS E A WEB: IS IT A GOOD MATCH?
-Adriane Orenha (UNESP - PG)

15.WEB COMO CORPUS PARA A ELABORAÇÃO DE VERBETES DO DICIONÁRIO
MULTILÍNGÜE DE CORES - DMC - Marília Gabriela Moreira Pagliaro (UNESP
- IBILCE - PG), Claudia Zavaglia (UNESP- IBILCE)

16.DESENVOLVIMENTO DE UM SOFTWARE PARA PREPARAÇÃO DE AULAS DE INGLÊS
COM CORPORA - José Lopes Moreira Filho (PUCSP)

17.ANÁLISE QUANTITATIVA ESTRUTURAL DE DISCURSOS DE BOHR - Silvia Maria
Gomes Caldeira (UFBA - PG)

18.PROBI - PARA UM CORPUS DO PORTUGUÊS NÃO-PADRÃO - Carmen Dayrell
(USP), Mônica Saddy Martins (USP), Ronaldo Martins (Mackenzie)

19.PROGRAMAS DE RÁDIO ON LINE COMO FONTE DE DADOS SOCIOLINGÜÍSTICOS -
Sabrina Rodrigues Garcia Balsalobre (UNESP), Henrique Junio Felipe
(UNESP)

20.O PRÉ-PROCESSAMENTO DE CORPUS PARA CONSTRUÇÃO DE MODELOS
ESTATÍSTICOS DE LÍNGUA - Daniel Bastos Pereira, Ivandré Paraboni (USP
- EACH)

21.THE MARKEDNESS OF YODA´S SPOKEN DISCOURSE IN COMPARISON WITH ITS
SUBTITLES IN THE INTERFACE OF SYSTEMIC FUNCTIONAL GRAMMAR AND CORPUS
BASED TRANSLATION STUDIES - Elaine Espindola (UFSC - PGI), Drª. Maria
Lúcia Vasconcellos (UFSC - PGI)

22.ANOTAÇÃO SEMÂNTICA: UM EXPERIMENTO A PARTIR DA SEMÂNTICA DE FRAMES
- Rove Chishman (UNISINOS), Lílian Figueiró Teixeira (PG - UNISINOS),
Anderson Bertoldi (CNPq-UNISINOS)

23.EXPRESSÕES ANUNCIADORAS DE PARÁFRASE E CARACTERÍSTICAS DE GÊNEROS
TEXTUAIS EM TRADUÇÃO: O MANUAL DIDÁTICO DE QUÍMICA GERAL - Susana de
Azeredo (UFRGS - PPG-Letras)

24.APLICATIVOS DE APOIO EM LC: DERIVADOS DO CORVO, IMPULSO AOS ESTUDOS
DE L1 - Gisele Montilha Pinheiro (PG-USP)

25.O DESENVOLVIMENTO DE UM ETIQUETADOR COM ALTA ACURÁCIA PARA O
PORTUGUÊS - Miriam Lúcia Domingues (UFPA/PPGEE), Eloi Luiz Favero, Ivo
Paixão de Medeiros (DEEC/UFPA)

26.ENSINO DE LÍNGUAS: LER, COMPREENDER E PRODUZIR TEXTOS ESCRITOS.
QUANTO DO VOCABULÁRIO LIDO APARECE NO ESCRITO? - Ângela Maria Tenório
Zucchi (USP-PG)

27.A IDENTIFICAÇÃO DE COMBINATÓRIAS TEXTUAIS JUNTO AOS COMPOSTOS
NOMINAIS ALEMÃES - Luciane Leipnitz (PPG-Letras/UFRGS)

28.O METADISCURSO EM TEXTOS DIDÁTICOS: UM ESTUDO EM CORPORA EM LÍNGUA
ALEMÃ - Ednusia Pinto de Carvalho (UFC/FUNCAP-CE(PG)

Dia 7 de setembro das 9h15 às 10h15

29.A PARTÍCULA NEGATIVA REDUZIDA "NU" - Joana Angélica Santos Lima
(UFMG/POSLIN)

30.ENTRELINHAS - UMA FERRAMENTA PARA PROCESSAMENTO E ANÁLISE DE CORPUS
- Filipi Pereira da Silveira (PUCRS)

31.O POLITICAMENTE CORRETO E O CONTROLE DA REPRESENTAÇÃO DERRISÓRIA DO
FEMININO NA MÍDIA IMPRESSA BRASILEIRA - Gisele Freitas de Aguiar
(UFSCar-PG)

32.A FRASEOLOGIA ESPECIALIZADA: A PERSPECTIVA DE DANIEL GOUADEC -
Diônifer Alan da Silveira (PIBIC CNPq/UFRGS), Sue Anne Christello
Coimbra (BIC UFRGS), Monissa Mattos (BIC-voluntária UFRGS), Cleci
Regina Bevilacqua (UFRGS)

33.ELABORAÇÃO DE CORPUS APLICÁVEL AO DOMÍNIO DO PATRIMÔNIO – Amanda
Pontes Rassi (PG-UFG)

34.CONTRASTANDO EXEMPLOS DE LIVROS DIDÁTICOS E CORPORA PARA ENSINO DE
VOCABULÁRIO EM LÍNGUA INGLESA - Patrícia Tosqui (UNESP-PG)

35.TERMOS TÉCNICO-CIENTÍFICOS NOS DICIONÁRIOS GERAIS DE LÍNGUA:
PRESENÇA, ESTRUTURAÇÃO E ADEQUAÇÃO DA LINGUAGEM DE SUAS DEFINIÇÕES -
Alexandra Feldekircher Muller (UFRGS - PPGLET)

36.A SEMÂNTICA DE "UM" E "ALGUM" EM PORTUGUÊS BRASILEIRO: UMA ANÁLISE
DE CORPUS - Maria Luiza Cunha Lima (UFMG)

37.UMA EXPERIÊNCIA DE EXTRAÇÃO AUTOMÁTICA DE TERMINOLOGIA DA ÁREA DE
INVERSORES DE FREQÜÊNCIA EM PORTUGUÊS E FRANCÊS - Diana Costa Fortier
Silva (UFC-PG)

38.COMPILAÇÃO DE UM CORPUS DE SAÚDE PÚBLICA - CORSA - Maria Cláudia de
Freitas (PUC/RJ)

39.ELEMENTOS PARA UMA ANÁLISE QUANTITATIVA DA LINGUAGEM DO JORNAL -
Carlos H. Kauffmann (Folha de S.Paulo)

40.A SOCIOTERMINOLOGIA DO COCO DE BABAÇU - Josete Marinho de Lucena
(UFT / UFC - PG)

41.CONSTRUÇÃO DO CORPUS PARA O DOMÍNIO FUTEBOL - Maria Cristina
Andrade dos Santos (UFSCar - PG)

42.COMO CONSTRUIR UM CORPUS DE LÍNGUA FALADA PARA ESTUDOS DE NEOLOGIA?
- Ieda Maria Alves (FFLCH-USP/CNPq), Bruno Oliveira Maroneze
(PG-FFLCH-USP), Débora Koizumi (IC-FFLCH-USP)

43.A TERMINOLOGIA DO ECOTURISMO COMO ESPELHO DE DIFERENTES VISÕES:
AGÊNCIAS DE TURISMO, AMBIENTALISTAS E GOVERNO - Josimeire Cristina
Martins (USP- PG)

44.CONSTRUÇÃO DE UM DICIONÁRIO ELETRÔNICO DA LÍNGUA LATINA – João
Batista Toledo Prado (Unesp), Rodrigo Vieira Marques (UFG / Unesp -
PG), Parla Camila dos Reis de Souza (UFSCar - IC), Oto Araújo Vale
(UFSCar)

45.APROXIMAÇÕES E DISTANCIAMENTOS NA TRADUÇÃO DE MARCADORES CULTURAIS
EM DOIS ROMANCES ESCRITOS POR JORGE AMADO E TRADUZIDOS POR GREGORY
RABASSA Valéria Cristiane Validório (UNESP - PG)

46.A LINGUÍSTICA DE CORPUS NO ESTUDO DA GRAMATICALIZAÇÃO DAS LOCUÇÕES
PREPOSITIVAS EM FRENTE A E FRENTE A - Camilla Canella Moraes (UERJ -
PG)

47.ESTUDO DA COMPETÊNCIA TRADUTÓRIA E SEU DESENVOLVIMENTO COM
UTILIZAÇÃO DE CORPUS DE TRADUÇÕES - Heloísa Pezza Cintrão (USP)

48.TRANSLATION, CHARACTER, AND ACTION IN CHILDREN'S FANTASY
LITERATURE: AN INTERFACE BETWEEN SFL AND CTS - Lincoln Fernandes (UFSC
– PGET)

49.LINGÜÍSTICA DE CORPUS E ANÁLISE LITERÁRIA: O QUE REVELAM AS
PALAVRAS-CHAVE - Lourdes Bernardes Gonçalves (UFC)

50.IDENTIFICANDO PADRÕES DE ESTILO DO TRADUTOR LITERÁRIO GIOVANNI
PONTIERO EM FOREIGN LEGION - Diva Cardoso de Camargo (UNESP)

51.UM ESTUDO COMPARATIVO DE DUAS OBRAS DE CLARICE LISPECTOR TRADUZIDAS
PARA O INGLÊS Thereza Cristina de Souza Lima (UNESP PG), Diva Cardoso
de Camargo(UNESP)

52.ESTUDO DA VARIAÇÃO SEMÂNTICA DA CONJUNÇÃO MAS EM PORTUGUÊS E SUAS
TRADUÇÕES EM FRANCÊS Marion Celli (G-FFLCH/USP), Adriana Zavaglia
(FFLCH/USP)

53.LINGÜÍSTICA DE CORPUS E CURRÍCULO LEXICAL: O DESENHO DE UM CURSO DE
LÍNGUA ESPANHOLA PARA NEGÓCIOS Cristiane Magalhães Bissaco (PG PUC-SP)

54.A CONSTRUÇÃO DE CORPORA COMPARÁVEIS PARA O ESTUDO DE CONTRATOS DE
COMPRA E VENDA TRADUZIDOS NO MODO JURAMENTEADO Celso Fernando Rocha
(UNESP/SJRP - PG), Diva Cardoso de Camargo (UNESP-SJRP)

55.CONSTRUÇÃO DE UM CÓRPUS PARALELO ALINHADO PARA A TRADUÇÃO
AUTOMÁTICA ESTATÍSTICA Wilker Ferreira Aziz (ICMC-USP), Thiago
Alexandre Salgueiro Pardo (ICMC-USP), Ivandré Paraboni (EACH-USP)

56.BASE LEGIS: UM CORPUS MULTILÍNGÜE DE LINGUAGEM LEGAL Anna Maria
BeckerMaciel (UFRGS), Danilo Nogueira Marra (PIBIC CNPq/UFRGS),
Diônifer Alan da Silveira (PIBIC CNPq/UFRGS)

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