Mickey Mortimer | 1 May 08:32 2003
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Re: New here, General Qs

T. Michael Keesey wrote-

> (It's also worth noting that one specimen assigned to _Sinosauropteryx_
has
> been claimed to be of a more basal neotetanuran, which would pretty much
make
> feathery tyrannosauroids a certainty.)

Slight correction-
Longrich believes Sinosauropteryx is the more basal form, not GMV 2124.
Incidentally, GMV 2124 may be a specimen of "Huaxiasaurus (NGMC 98-5-003,
and CAGS 30-2-035?).

Mickey Mortimer

Heathcote, Julia | 1 May 16:45 2003
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Eshanosaurus deguchiianus

Just wondering what list members think about Eshanosaurus and its place
within dinosaur phylogeny.

I know Xu et al (2001, JVP 21(3): 477-483) published good reasons why it was
a therizinosauroid, but they reported that some people would have said it
was a prosauropod.  I know nothing about the tooth and jaw characters used
to define it, but it seems odd that a fragment that could initially be
confused with a prosauropod is found below a prosauropod horizon some 80 Ma
before the first therizinosauroids and NOT be a prosauropod.

If I'm talking rubbish please tell me (and then forgive me).  This is NOT my
speciality, but it's been worrying me for a few days now.  If it is a
therizinosauroid has there been any further work on the implications for
theropod evolution?  Where is the massive early Jurassic explosion of
theropod taxa that surely would have to accompany this?

Julia

Julia Heathcote
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Road
South Kensington
London SW7 5BD

Nick Pharris | 1 May 18:44 2003
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Re: Big Bakker article in June Discovery Mag

Quoting MariusRomanus <at> aol.com:

> I know that the Canadian theropods are albertosaurs (or has it now been
> permanently changed to gorgosaurs)

Two different animals, but yes, I think the well-known one has turned out to 
be _Gorgosaurus_.

Nick Pharris
Department of Linguistics
University of Michigan

Jaime A. Headden | 1 May 20:07 2003
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Re: Eshanosaurus deguchiianus

Julia Heathcote (julia.heathcote <at> imperial.ac.uk) wrote:

  [...]

  Wondering about *Eshanosaurus*? Currently in review is a paper on the
nature of the beast. Identifying it as prosauropod or therizinosauroid is
difficult, and essentially relates to plesiomoprhies, given one group or
the other, or functional features (there are prosauropods with curved
teeth and swollen bases of the crowns); there are also a dearth of cranial
or essentially lower jaw-related synapomorphies for "prosauropods" or
basal sauropodomorphans. This hampers the issue of identification, at
least in this person's opinion.

  Cheers,

=====
Jaime A. Headden

  Little steps are often the hardest to take.  We are too used to making leaps in the face of adversity, that a
simple skip is so hard to do.  We should all learn to walk soft, walk small, see the world around us rather than
zoom by it.

"Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)

__________________________________
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(Continue reading)

Nick Gardner | 1 May 21:10 2003
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Re: Big Bakker article in June Discovery Mag

Kris wrote:
>Oh, it also says that "Raptor Pack", a summary of his research
>aimed at young readers, will be published this month.
>

Does it state where this will be available?

>"Our allosaurs just get wacked.".
>

LOL!

>The work has inspired researchers like Behrensmeyer to do similar studies 
>on the environment of human ancestors in Africa by collecting
>croc teeth, and the finding of bones of adult and juvenile theropods
>mixed together in locales like Canada, Argentina, and Japan, are, as
>Phil Currie says, "in concentrations that are just too high to be 
>coincidental."
>

Like Kris, I have no clue about the situation in Japan.  CMIIW, but only a 
few specimens have been collected.  What he is talking about?

>Illustrations are by James Gurney. His feathered baby allosaurs are just 
>adorable.

Gurney gave them feathers? Yay!

>Bakker says, "Can I put my e-mail address in the story so graduate
>students can write me if they want to do this?"........
(Continue reading)

MariusRomanus | 2 May 02:20 2003
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Re: Big Bakker article in June Discovery Mag

Raptor Pack:

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/results.asp?WRD=Raptor+Pack&userid=2XDL6FD6ZI&cds2Pid=946

You can pre-order it now if ya like. Michael Skrepnick is the illustrator.

Kris

Roger Smith | 2 May 07:12 2003
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Re: Raptor Pack

Nick,

This book is available in the DINOSAURNEWS books (more books page) section
http://www.dinosaurnews.org

best wishes
Roger
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Nick Gardner" <ratites637 <at> hotmail.com>
To: <MariusRomanus <at> aol.com>; <dinosaur <at> usc.edu>
Sent: Friday, May 02, 2003 7:10 AM
Subject: Re: Big Bakker article in June Discovery Mag

> Kris wrote:
> >Oh, it also says that "Raptor Pack", a summary of his research
> >aimed at young readers, will be published this month.
> >
>
> Does it state where this will be available?
>
>
> >"Our allosaurs just get wacked.".
> >

Adam Britton | 2 May 10:43 2003
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Re: Big Bakker article in June Discovery Mag

From: <MariusRomanus <at> aol.com>
Sent: Thursday, May 01, 2003 8:19 AM

>>> The article goes on to explain his findings from 33 sites at Como
Bluff... How the teeth of adult and young allosaurs were basically the same,
meaning they ate the same things (unlike crocodilians which show a different
pattern)... Bones of prey exhibit baby and adult teeth marks... Baby teeth
are found shed with adult teeth, meaning they were eating in the same place,
feeding together... which leads to his "lairs", being not dens or nests, but
just a communal feeding area.<<<

That's an interesting article. Let me explain a scenario with Australian
freshwater crocodiles that really has nothing to do with allosaurs, but does
indicate alternative interpretations of finding large groups of teeth.

During the wet season, temperatures in northern Australia are consistently
high by day and night, prey are abundant, and crocodiles feed extensively.
Their stomachs are full of a variety of prey items. During these times,
crocodiles disperse out of river systems and across floodplains, essentially
following the margins of floodwaters. Most of their feeding occurs during
this time, and hence teeth shed during feeding are dispersed over a wide
area.

By contrast, during the dry season the water levels fall and the crocodiles
become increasingly concentrated in permanent bodies of water. The rivers
typically dry up and most crocodiles move to relatively small (eg. 50 x 100
metres) billabongs. While daytime temperatures are relatively warm, night
time temperatures fall substantially and prey depletes rapidly, the end
result being that these crocodiles eat virtually nothing for the majority of
the 6 month dry season. Stomach content analysis confirms this. However,
(Continue reading)

HPB1956 | 2 May 12:21 2003
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Re: Big Bakker article in June Discovery Mag

Adam RC Britton wrote

> Therefore, with Australian freshwater crocodiles, teeth and bones of
> various size classes are found in very high concentrations in the bed
> of these billabongs, deposited there during the dry season when feeding
> does not occur

I don't know Bakker's article in Discovery. But if I have read the postings
on this list correctly then Bakker talked about allosaur teeth found at this
"lairs", _not bones of allosaurs_, mixed with bones of prey.
(Am I correct?)

Cheers

Heinz Peter Bredow

Tim Donovan | 2 May 12:23 2003
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Re: Big Bakker article in June Discovery Mag


Nick Pharris <npharris <at> umich.edu> wrote:
Quoting MariusRomanus <at> aol.com:

> I know that the Canadian theropods are albertosaurs (or has it now been
> permanently changed to gorgosaurs)

Two different animals, but yes, I think the well-known one has turned out to 
be _Gorgosaurus_.

  Is it valid, and different from Daspletosaurus?

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