Jay | 29 Jul 03:34 2014
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Group name suffixes

[re-sent because the post does not register on DML]

This question regards use of non-formal names for groups/clades, which I hope can be clarified.

When discussing a natural group, such as Sauropodomorpha, the typical reference to it in most contexts
seems to be simply by appending an 's' to the end.

E.g., "there are several sauropods known from the Morrison Formation"
"..the sauropodomorphs Plateosaurus and Unaysaurus are sister taxa"
"Unlike the known bipedal ornithopods from DPF, the pachycephalosaurs are...

However, I've very occasionally come across in the published literature a few cases where an '-ans' is
suffixed to the formal group name to derive the casual use - i.e., sauropodans, ornithopodans, sauropodomorphans.

Does anyone know 1, why one style if any might be incorrect; 2, and if both are acceptable, then what if any are
the circumstances where one style must only be used over the other.

I can see a use of the '-ans' suffix specifically as an adverb when referring to phylogenetic outgroups --
e.g., "...Lesothosaurus is a non-ornithopodan ornithischian" -- but don't see why this must be so.

Note that in regards to Dinosauria, I'm not too concerned about choice use of 'dinosaurs' vs 'dinosaurians'

Jay | 29 Jul 00:16 2014
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ornithopodans vs ornithopods

This question regards use of non-formal names for groups/clades, which I hope can be clarified.

When discussing a natural group, such as Sauropodomorpha, the typical reference to it in most contexts
seems to be simply by appending an 's' to the end. 

E.g., "there are several sauropods known from the Morrison Formation"
"..the sauropodomorphs Plateosaurus and Unaysaurus are sister taxa"
"Unlike the known bipedal ornithopods from DPF, the pachycephalosaurs are...

However, I've very occasionally come across in the published literature a few cases where an '-ans' is
suffixed to the formal group name to derive the casual use - i.e., sauropodans, ornithopodans, sauropodomorphans.

Does anyone know 1, why one style if any might be incorrect; 2, and if both are acceptable, then what if any are
the circumstances where one style must only be used over the other.

I can see a use of the '-ans' suffix specifically as an adverb when referring to phylogenetic outgroups --
e.g., "...Lesothosaurus is a non-ornithopodan ornithischian" -- but don't see why this must be so.

Note that in regards to Dinosauria, I'm not too concerned about choice use of 'dinosaurs' vs 'dinosaurians'

Ben Creisler | 28 Jul 19:34 2014
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Crocodylian hearing study + origin of feathers + virtual moas (news)

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A number of recent news and blog items:

Hearing in crocodylians, aquatic and terrestrial, living and fossil

http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/news/latest/2014/07/Crocodile-ears.aspx

===
Origin of feathers

http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/07/28/4055368.htm

**
Blog about origin of feathers (does not include Kulindadromeus)

http://written-in-stone-seen-through-my-lens.blogspot.com/2014/07/guest-post-before-they-took-off-study.html

==
Virtual Bird Park Kickstarter project in New Zealand to bring back moa
and Haast eagle in virtual reality with tablet computers

with video:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/themoaisagoer/we-are-bringing-the-moas-back-nzs-1st-virtual-bird

http://nzkiwihouse.blogspot.co.nz/

====
More about discovery of giant sauropod "claw" (terminal toe bone) at
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 28 Jul 18:14 2014
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Pterosaurian biogeography (free pdf)

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A new open-access paper:

Paul Upchurch, Brian Andres, Richard J. Butler & Paul M. Barrett (2014)
An analysis of pterosaurian biogeography: implications for the
evolutionary history and fossil record quality of the first flying
vertebrates.
Historical Biology (advance online publication)
DOI:10.1080/08912963.2014.939077
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08912963.2014.939077#.U9Z2G_ldXTo

The biogeographical history of pterosaurs has received very little
treatment. Here, we present the first quantitative analysis of
pterosaurian biogeography based on an event-based parsimony method
(Treefitter). This approach was applied to a phylogenetic tree
comprising the relationships of 108 in-group pterosaurian taxa,
spanning the full range of this clade's stratigraphical and
geographical extent. The results indicate that there is no support for
the impact of vicariance or coherent dispersal on pterosaurian
distributions. However, this group does display greatly elevated
levels of sympatry. Although sampling biases and taxonomic problems
might have artificially elevated the occurrence of sympatry, we argue
that our results probably reflect a genuine biogeographical signal. We
propose a novel model to explain pterosaurian distributions:
pterosaurs underwent a series of ‘sweep-stakes’ dispersal events
(across oceanic barriers in most cases), resulting in the founding of
sympatric clusters of taxa. Examination of the spatiotemporal
distributions of pterosaurian occurrences indicates that their fossil
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 28 Jul 16:33 2014
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Dinosaur extinction and reduced diversity (free pdf)

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A new paper in open access:

Stephen L. Brusatte, Richard J. Butler, Paul M. Barrett, Matthew T.
Carrano, David C. Evans, Graeme T. Lloyd, Philip D. Mannion, Mark A.
Norell, Daniel J. Peppe, Paul Upchurch and Thomas E. Williamson (2014)
The extinction of the dinosaurs.
Biological Reviews (advance online publication)
DOI: 10.1111/brv.12128
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/brv.12128/full
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/brv.12128/pdf

Non-avian dinosaurs went extinct 66 million years ago, geologically
coincident with the impact of a large bolide (comet or asteroid)
during an interval of massive volcanic eruptions and changes in
temperature and sea level. There has long been fervent debate about
how these events affected dinosaurs. We review a wealth of new data
accumulated over the past two decades, provide updated and novel
analyses of long-term dinosaur diversity trends during the latest
Cretaceous, and discuss an emerging consensus on the extinction's
tempo and causes. Little support exists for a global, long-term
decline across non-avian dinosaur diversity prior to their extinction
at the end of the Cretaceous. However, restructuring of latest
Cretaceous dinosaur faunas in North America led to reduced diversity
of large-bodied herbivores, perhaps making communities more
susceptible to cascading extinctions. The abruptness of the dinosaur
extinction suggests a key role for the bolide impact, although the
coarseness of the fossil record makes testing the effects of Deccan
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 28 Jul 06:35 2014
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Asteroid's 'bad timing' killed off dinosaurs

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

I don't have a ref yet for the paper in Biological Reviews, but here
are news stories:

http://www.livescience.com/47025-dinosaur-killing-impact-bad-timing.html

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/jul/28/dinosaurs-asteroid-bad-timing-killed-off-biodiversity-edinburgh-scientists

Ben Creisler | 27 Jul 23:08 2014
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Rhynchosaur osteohistology shows fast growth + giant Eocene penguin from Antarctica

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A number of recent non-dino papers that may be of interest:

Fábio Hiratsuka Veiga, Marina Bento Soares, and Juliana Manso Sayão (2014)
Osteohistology of hyperodapedontine rhynchosaurs from the Upper
Triassic of Southern Brazil.
Acta Palaeontologica Polonica (in press)
doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.4202/app.00074.2014
http://app.pan.pl/article/item/app000742014.html

The first osteohistological study focused exclusively on rhynchosaurs
(non-archosauriform archosauromorphs), based on the hyperodapedontines
Teyumbaita sulcognathus and Hyperodapedon sp., from the Upper Triassic
of Southern Brazil, indicates a relatively rapid growth rate in early
ontogeny shown by the fibrolamellar complex, with a change to slow
intermittent growth during late ontogeny represented by
parallel-fibred bone with several growth marks. Contrary to previous
studies, which described a typical non-archosaur reptilian bone tissue
pattern for rhynchosaurs, with growth marks extending across the
entire cortex, we demonstrate that, in both studied taxa, the initial
growth rate was faster in comparison to the later. This suggests that
the ability rapid growth at high rates was already present in basal
non-archosauriform archosauromorphs.

==

Carolina Acosta Hospitaleche (2014)
New giant penguin bones from Antarctica: Systematic and
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 27 Jul 22:38 2014
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Giant sauropod claw found in France + other news

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A number of recent news stories:

Giant sauropod claw found at Angeac-Charente in France; angry "thunder
lizard" spirit unleashes thunderstorm, floods dig site (in French)

http://www.sudouest.fr/2014/07/26/angeac-charente-16-une-rarissime-griffe-de-dinosaure-decouverte-juste-avant-l-orage-1626256-726.php

blog with photos and video

http://petitcarnetpaleo.blogspot.fr/2014/07/la-colere-du-grand-sauropode.html

***
North Dakota state Paleontologist John Hoganson retires

http://www.postbulletin.com/archives/north-dakota-s-st-state-paleontologist-retiring/article_f3921d39-53ad-5c75-af39-5846c9fdc2f2.html

==

Bat-Pterodacyls

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/history-of-geology/2014/07/23/bat-pterodactyl/

===

Cryolophosaurus with feathers? (in Italian)

http://gaianews.it/blog/pangea-post/crilofosauro-carnivoro-piumato-dellantartide-56873.html#.U9MxevldXTo
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 26 Jul 17:32 2014
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Beware big-clawed "killer" anteaters

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

Don't mess with big-clawed critters--ground sloths, chalicotheres,
therizinosaurs, Deinocheirus, etc.....

Vidal Haddad Jr,  Guilherme C. Reckziegel,  Domingos G. Neto &  Fábio
L. Pimentel (2014)
Human Death Caused by a Giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga trydactila) in Brazil.
Wilderness & Environmental Medicine (advance online publication)
doi: 10.1016/j.wem.2014.04.008
http://www.wemjournal.org/article/PIIS108060321400115X/abstract

The fatal outcome of a defensive attack by a giant anteater
(Myrmecophaga trydactila) is reported. The attack occurred while the
victim was hunting, and his dogs cornered the adult anteater, which
assumed an erect, threatening position. The hunter did not fire his
rifle because of concern about accidentally shooting his dogs. He
approached the animal armed with a knife, but was grabbed by its
forelimbs. When his sons freed him, he had puncture wounds and severe
bleeding in the left inguinal region; he died at the scene.
Necroscopic examination showed femoral artery lesions and a large
hematoma in the left thigh, with death caused by hypovolemic shock. A
similar case is cited, and recommendations are made that boundaries
between wildlife and humans be respected, especially when they
coinhabit a given area.

News article:

http://phys.org/news/2014-07-giant-anteaters-hunters-brazil.html
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 26 Jul 17:15 2014
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Titanosaurian teeth from Lo Hueco site (Cretaceous, Spain)

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A new online paper:

Verónica Díez Díaz, Francisco Ortega & José L. Sanz (2014)
Titanosaurian teeth from the Upper Cretaceous of "Lo Hueco" (Cuenca, Spain).
Cretaceous Research 51: 285–291
DOI: 10.1016/j.cretres.2014.07.003
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667114001360

The Upper Cretaceous fossil site of “Lo Hueco” (Cuenca, Spain) has
yielded two morphotypes of sauropod teeth referable to Titanosauria.
One (“Lo Hueco” morphotype A) is composed of robust spatulate crown
teeth. These teeth exhibit the same morphology and microwear patterns
in the apical facet as teeth described from the Massecaps site (Upper
Cretaceous of southeastern France). The second morphotype (“Lo Hueco”
morphotype B) comprises gracile spatulate teeth similar to those of
the French titanosaur genus Atsinganosaurus. However, further analysis
of skeletal and cranial elements from “Lo Hueco” and its association
with the described dental morphotypes will be needed to establish the
degree of proximity between the Iberian and French taxa.

The presence of at least two more titanosaurian taxa in the Iberian
Peninsula, besides the well-known species Lirainosaurus astibiae,
corroborates the increase in the known diversity of the sauropod
faunae from the Upper Cretaceous of the Ibero-Armorican Island
suggested by previous studies on the biota of “Lo Hueco”. In addition,
the microwear differences found in the apical wear facets of the two
morphotypes could be explained as due to different diets. The absence
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 26 Jul 04:38 2014
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Otozoum (E. Jurassic dinosaur(?) ichnogenus) from Namibia

Ben Creisler
bcreislerF <at> gmail.com

A new online paper:

Simone D'Orazi Porchetti, Helke B. Mocke, Marianna Latiano and
Alexander Wagensommer (2014)
First record of Otozoum from Namibia.
Lethaia (advance online publication)
DOI: 10.1111/let.12088
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/let.12088/abstract

The first incontrovertible Otozoum moodii of Gondwana is described
from the Etjo Formation (Waterberg Plateau, Namibia). Distinct Otozoum
trackways and isolated footprints are reported from the Omuramba
Omambonde tracksite, in the Otjozondjupa Region (North–central
Namibia). Previously known only from North America, Europe and
possibly Lesotho, the occurrence of Otozoum is a definitive time
constraint for an Early Jurassic age of the Etjo Formation. The
presence of Otozoum in the hyperarid facies and specifically in
interdune setting of the Etjo Formation is in accordance with previous
claims of environmental selectivity for this ichnomorph.


Gmane