Ben Creisler | 24 Apr 18:15 2014
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Dinosaur teeth carried by flowing water (free pdf)

From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A recent paper in open-access PeerJ:

Joseph E. Peterson, Jason J. Coenen & Christopher R. Noto (2014)
Fluvial transport potential of shed and root-bearing dinosaur teeth
from the late Jurassic Morrison Formation.
PeerJ 2:e347
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.347
https://peerj.com/articles/347/

Shed dinosaur teeth are commonly collected microvertebrate remains
that have been used for interpretations of dinosaur feeding behaviors,
paleoecology, and population studies. However, such interpretations
may be biased by taphonomic processes such as fluvial sorting
influenced by tooth shape: shed teeth, removed from the skull during
life, and teeth possessing roots, removed from the skull after death.
As such, teeth may behave differently in fluvial systems due to their
differences in shape. In order to determine the influence of fluvial
processes on the preservation and distribution of shed and
root-bearing dinosaur teeth, the hydrodynamic behaviors of
high-density urethane resin casts of shed and root-bearing Allosaurus
and Camarasaurus teeth were experimentally tested for relative
transport distances at increasing flow velocities in an artificial
fluviatile environment. Results show that tooth cast specimens
exhibited comparable patterns of transport at lower velocities, though
the shed Camarasaurus teeth transported considerably farther in medium
to higher flow velocities. Two-Way ANOVA tests indicate significant
differences in the mean transport distances of tooth casts oriented
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 24 Apr 18:01 2014
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Kryptodrakon, earliest pterodactyloid pterosaur from Mid-Jurassic of China

From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A new online paper:

Brian Andres, James Clark & Xing Xu (2014)
The Earliest Pterodactyloid and the Origin of the Group.
Current Biology (advance online publication)
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.03.030
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982214003224
http://www.cell.com/current-biology/abstract/S0960-9822(14)00322-4

Summary
The pterosaurs were a diverse group of Mesozoic flying reptiles that
underwent a body plan reorganization, adaptive radiation, and
replacement of earlier forms midway through their long history,
resulting in the origin of the Pterodactyloidea, a highly specialized
clade containing the largest flying organisms. The sudden appearance
and large suite of morphological features of this group were suggested
to be the result of it originating in terrestrial environments, where
the pterosaur fossil record has traditionally been poor, and its many
features suggested to be adaptations to those environments. However,
little evidence has been available to test this hypothesis, and it has
not been supported by previous phylogenies or early pterodactyloid
discoveries. We report here the earliest pterosaur with the diagnostic
elongate metacarpus of the Pterodactyloidea, Kryptodrakon progenitor,
gen. et sp. nov., from the terrestrial Middle-Upper Jurassic boundary
of Northwest China. Phylogenetic analysis confirms this species as the
basalmost pterodactyloid and reconstructs a terrestrial origin and a
predominantly terrestrial history for the Pterodactyloidea.
(Continue reading)

Richard W. Travsky | 24 Apr 17:59 2014
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News on the Jurassic World movie

Behind the scenes pictures

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/67050

Sequels and animatronics

http://www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=40832

Ben Creisler | 24 Apr 17:34 2014
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Gastornithid eggs from France

Sorry for the typo in subject line...

On Thu, Apr 24, 2014 at 8:33 AM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> From: Ben Creisler
> bcreisler <at> gmail.com
>
> A non-dino paper that may be of interest:
>
> D. Angst, E. Buffetaut, C. Lécuyer, R. Amiot, F. Smektala, S. Giner,
> A. Méchin, P. Méchin, A. Amoros, L. Leroy, M. Guiomar, H. Tong and A.
> Martinez (2014)
> Fossil avian eggs from the Palaeogene of southern France: new size
> estimates and a possible taxonomic identification of the egg-layer.
> Geological Magazine (advance online publication)
> DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0016756814000077
> http://128.232.233.5/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9230936&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0016756814000077
>
>
>
>
> Eggshell fragments attributed to large birds have been known from the
> Palaeogene of southern France for half a century, but reconstructing
> their original dimensions and identifying the birds that laid the eggs
> has been fraught with difficulties. On the basis of numerous newly
> collected specimens and using geometrical calculations, the original
> size of the thick-shelled eggs is reconstructed, showing that they
> were slightly larger than ostrich eggs, with a greatest length of 17.8
> cm and a mean diameter of 12.0 cm in transversal section. The
> estimated volume is 1330.4 cm3. The fossil eggs from southern France
> are thus among the largest known avian eggs, being only surpassed by
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 24 Apr 17:33 2014
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Gastronithid eggs from France

From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A non-dino paper that may be of interest:

D. Angst, E. Buffetaut, C. Lécuyer, R. Amiot, F. Smektala, S. Giner,
A. Méchin, P. Méchin, A. Amoros, L. Leroy, M. Guiomar, H. Tong and A.
Martinez (2014)
Fossil avian eggs from the Palaeogene of southern France: new size
estimates and a possible taxonomic identification of the egg-layer.
Geological Magazine (advance online publication)
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0016756814000077
http://128.232.233.5/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9230936&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0016756814000077

Eggshell fragments attributed to large birds have been known from the
Palaeogene of southern France for half a century, but reconstructing
their original dimensions and identifying the birds that laid the eggs
has been fraught with difficulties. On the basis of numerous newly
collected specimens and using geometrical calculations, the original
size of the thick-shelled eggs is reconstructed, showing that they
were slightly larger than ostrich eggs, with a greatest length of 17.8
cm and a mean diameter of 12.0 cm in transversal section. The
estimated volume is 1330.4 cm3. The fossil eggs from southern France
are thus among the largest known avian eggs, being only surpassed by
Aepyornis and some moas. Estimated egg mass is about 1.4 kg. On the
basis of egg mass, the body mass of the parent bird is estimated at
between 135.4 kg and 156.4 kg, assuming that the hatchlings were
precocial. These calculations are in good agreement with the
dimensions and mass estimates for the Palaeogene giant bird Gastornis,
a probable anseriform, which lived in Europe at the time the eggs were
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 24 Apr 00:37 2014
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Julius Csotonyi paleoart book and other news

From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

New book preview for The Paleoart of Julius Csotonyi

http://www.wired.com/2014/04/dinosaur-paleoart-csotonyi/#x

Galleries online (with digital watermarks on images)

http://www.csotonyi.com/Galleries.html

===

Skull of plesiosaur Occitanosaurus CT-scanned to study inner-ear
structure (in French)

http://www.midilibre.fr/2014/04/22/l-homme-qui-fait-parler-l-oreille-du-plesiosaure,851786.php

==

Historic sauropod metatarsal returned to Scarborough museum in England

http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/doncaster-dinosaur-toe-is-heading-for-scarborough-1-6575387

==
Nathan Myhrvold's dinosaur interest (video)

http://www.usatoday.com/videos/tech/2014/04/22/7907169/

(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 23 Apr 18:06 2014
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Cetiosaurus gets new type species and free Diplodocus book (in Spanish)

From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

ICZN has voted to designate a new type species for Cetiosaurus:

International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature. 2014.
OPINION 2331 (Case 3472): Cetiosaurus Owen, 1841 (Dinosauria,
Sauropoda): usage conserved by designation of Cetiosaurus oxoniensis
Phillips, 1871 as the type species.
Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature 71(1):48-50.
http://www.miketaylor.org.uk/dino/pubs/upchurch-et-al-2009/UpchurchEtAl2009-BZN-case-3472-cetiosaurus-type-species-oxoniensis-DECISION.pdf

The Commission has conserved the usage of the generic name Cetiosaurus
Owen, 1841 by designating Cetiosaurus oxoniensis Phillips, 1871 as the
type species of Cetiosaurus in place of Cetiosaurus medius Owen, 1842.

==

Not yet mentioned on the DML:

Free book about Diplodocus skeleton that Carnegie sent to Madrid in
1913 (in Spanish)

Begoña Sánchez-Chillón & Adán Pérez-García (2013)
Diplodocus carnegii. 100 años en el Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales

http://web1.mncn.csic.es/diplodocus/sources/projet/Diplodocus-Carnegii-2.pdf

==

(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 23 Apr 17:50 2014
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Cretaceous mammal lineages survived into Cenozoic in South America (resend)

From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

I sent this item yesterday but it was lost in cyberspace (a problem I
have noticed with a number of postings lately). I don't know if the
issue is gmail or the DML...

===

A new non-dino paper that may be of interest:

Nicolás R. Chimento, Federico L. Agnolina & Fernando E. Novas (2014)
The bizarre 'metatherians' Groeberia and Patagonia, late surviving
members of gondwanatherian mammals.
Historical Biology (advance online publication)
DOI:10.1080/08912963.2014.903945
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08912963.2014.903945#.U1aDqPldXeI

Cenozoic mammalian faunas from South America contrast with those of
the other continents by the great diversification of metatherian
mammals. Among the later, a wide range of morphological disparity have
been reported, and several bizarre mammals have been assigned to such
clade, based mainly on biogeographical grounds. Outstanding examples
of bizarre mammals referred to as Metatheria are the Eocene Groeberia
and the Miocene Patagonia. Recent discoveries indicate that South
America possessed a more diverse faunal composition than previously
thought, and it became evident that many Mesozoic holdovers (e.g.
australosphenidans, gondwanatherians and dryolestoids) surpassed the
K/T boundary, thus forming part of the Cenozoic faunas. The Cenozoic
taxa Patagonia and Groeberia exhibit several similarities with the
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 23 Apr 00:36 2014
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Pliosaur neurovascular system suggests special sensory receptors

From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A new online paper:

Davide Foffa, Judyth Sassoon, Andrew R. Cuff, Mark N. Mavrogordato &
Michael J. Benton (2014)
Complex rostral neurovascular system in a giant pliosaur.
Naturwissenschaften (advance online publication)
DOI: 10.1007/s00114-014-1173-3
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00114-014-1173-3

Pliosaurs were a long-lived, ubiquitous group of Mesozoic marine
predators attaining large body sizes (up to 12 m). Despite much being
known about their ecology and behaviour, the mechanisms they adopted
for prey detection have been poorly investigated and represent a
mystery to date. Complex neurovascular systems in many vertebrate
rostra have evolved for prey detection. However, information on the
occurrence of such systems in fossil taxa is extremely limited because
of poor preservation potential. The neurovascular complex from the
snout of an exceptionally well-preserved pliosaur from the
Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic, c. 170 Myr ago) of Weymouth Bay (Dorset,
UK) is described here for the first time. Using computed tomography
(CT) scans, the extensive bifurcating neurovascular channels could be
traced through the rostrum to both the teeth and the foramina on the
dorsal and lateral surface of the snout. The structures on the surface
of the skull and the high concentrations of peripheral rami suggest
that this could be a sensory system, perhaps similar to crocodile
pressure receptors or shark electroreceptors.

(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 22 Apr 21:55 2014
Ben Creisler | 22 Apr 20:55 2014
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Bifurcated neural spines in tetrapods beyond sauropods

From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A new paper that may be of interest:

D. Cary Woodruff  (2014)
The anatomy of the bifurcated neural spine and its occurence within Tetrapoda
Journal of Morphology (advance online publication)
DOI: 10.1002/jmor.20283
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jmor.20283/abstract

Vertebral neural spine bifurcation has been historically treated as
largely restrictive to sauropodomorph dinosaurs; wherein it is
inferred to be an adaptation in response to the increasing weight from
the horizontally extended cervical column. Because no extant
terrestrial vertebrates have massive, horizontally extended necks,
extant forms with large cranial masses were examined for the presence
of neural spine bifurcation. Here, I report for the first time on the
soft tissue surrounding neural spine bifurcation in a terrestrial
quadruped through the dissection of three Ankole-Watusi cattle. With
horns weighing up to a combined 90 kg, the Ankole-Watusi is unlike any
other breed of cattle in terms of cranial weight and presence of
neural spine bifurcation. Using the Ankole-Watusi as a model, it
appears that neural spine bifurcation plays a critical role in
supporting a large mobile weight adjacent to the girdles. In addition
to neural spine bifurcation being recognized within nonavian
dinosaurs, this vertebral feature is also documented within many
members of temnospondyls, captorhinids, seymouriamorphs,
diadectomorphs, Aves, marsupials, artiodactyls, perissodactyls, and
Primates, amongst others. This phylogenetic distribution indicates
(Continue reading)


Gmane