john-schneiderman | 19 Apr 23:10 2015
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Re: Date of T. rex discovery

When was the material { NMC 9380; formerly AMNH 973 ) which would become "Tyrannosaurus rex" discovered?

Discovered and collected by Barnum Brown, 1902, 1905; at Fort Peck, Dawson County, Montana. reposited in
the AMNH. 
Named Tyrannosaurus rex by H F Osborn, 1905

---- Poekilopleuron <dinosaurtom2015 <at> seznam.cz> wrote: 
> Good day,
> 
> 
> 
> I would like to ask what is the first date of _Tyrannosaurus rex_ discovery?
> I know that the first unrecognized remains were found already in 1874, but 
> the first scientifically recognized specimen was Barnum Brown's individual 
> from eastern Montana. Many sources give a date of 12th August 1902 as the 
> day of its discovery, but Jack Horner in his book "Dinosaurs under the Big 
> Sky" repeatedly uses the year 1903. So what is the true date (I guess it is 
> 1902, but Horner is a respectable authority, esp. when it comes to T. rex). 
> Thank you, Tom

Poekilopleuron | 19 Apr 10:23 2015
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Date of T. rex discovery

Good day,

I would like to ask what is the first date of _Tyrannosaurus rex_ discovery?
I know that the first unrecognized remains were found already in 1874, but 
the first scientifically recognized specimen was Barnum Brown's individual 
from eastern Montana. Many sources give a date of 12th August 1902 as the 
day of its discovery, but Jack Horner in his book "Dinosaurs under the Big 
Sky" repeatedly uses the year 1903. So what is the true date (I guess it is 
1902, but Horner is a respectable authority, esp. when it comes to T. rex). 
Thank you, Tom
Ben Creisler | 18 Apr 21:44 2015
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Max the Galeamopus on display + gigantic Amphicoelias real? + more news

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A number of recent news and blog items:

Max the Galeamopus  on display at the Sauriermuseum Aathal in
Switzerland, with videos (in German)
The very complete specimen from Wyoming, displayed with 80 to 90% real
fossil bone (but most of the tail is from a second specimen)

http://www.zol.ch/bezirk-hinwil/seegraeben/Saurier-Max-erobert-die-Herzen-der-Museumsbesucher/story/17777165

http://www.nzz.ch/zuerich/saurier-max-aus-der-goldgrube-1.18524059

==

Gigantic Amphicoelias said to be real

http://www.canoncitydailyrecord.com/news/canoncity-local-news/ci_27939146/evidence-indicates-dinosaur-did-exist

===
Blog items from XIII Encuentro de Jóvenes Investigadores en
Paleontología  (in Spanish)

Variability in titanosaur morphology

http://godzillin.blogspot.com/2015/04/la-variabilidad-de-los-titanosaurios-de.html
****
Nothosaur from Spain

(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 18 Apr 20:49 2015
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Russian vertpaleo monographs and books online at GeoKniga

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

For those not familiar with the GeoKniga site, it offers free links to
an expanding number of downloadable papers, publications, and
books--primarily in Russian--on topics related to geology and
paleontology. Some GeoKniga links show up in Google Scholar, but most
do not was far I can determine.

http://www.geokniga.org/

In recent months a number of new vert-paleo items (especially for
Permian tetrapods) have been added, including various complete
monograph volumes from the Trudy Paleontologicheskogo Instituta
(literally "Works of the Paleontological Institute," but alternately
translated either as Transactions of the Paleontological Institute or
as Proceedings of the Paleontological Institute, or as the French
Travaux de l'Institut Paléontologique de l'Académie des Sciences
(Trav. Inst. Pal. Acad. Sci.), in non-Russian scientific literature--I
have used Transactions of the Paleontological Institute here.)

While some files are offered in pdf, the larger files are usually in
djvu format, which can be converted to pdf after download if
preferred. There are many places on the web to download free djvu
readers and pdf converters.

The reproduction quality of the earlier posted documents (from 2012 or
so) may not be as clear as the some of more recently posted material.

Direct links to downloadable files are not possible apparently. You
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 18 Apr 05:28 2015
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Jurassic ichthyosaurs + Triassic coprolites from Poland + Permian tracks from Italy + more

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A number of recent non-dino papers that may be of interest:

Insacco, G., Chairenza, A. A., and Cau, A., 2013/2014
Temnodontosaurus and Stenopterygius (Diapsida: Ichthyosauria)
specimens in the Comiso Natural History Museum (Sicily, Italy).
Natura Rerum 3: 1-12

free pdf:
http://www.edizionibelvedere.it/images/pdf/volume3/1.%20Insacco%20et%20al.pdf

The paleontological collection of the Comiso Natural History Museum
(Sicily, Italy) includes two ichthyosaurian specimens from the Lower
Jurassic Posidonia Shale (southwestern Germany). Based on comparative
morphology, we refer them to Temnodontosaurus and Stenopterygius both
common genera in the Toarcian of Southern Germany.

====

Michal Zaton, Grzegorz Niedzwiedzki, Leszek Marynowski, Karim
Benzerara, Christian Pott, Julie Cosmidis, Tomasz Krzykawski & Pawel
Filipiak (2015)
Coprolites of Late Triassic carnivorous vertebrates from Poland: an
integrative approach.
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (advance online publication)
doi:10.1016/j.palaeo.2015.04.009
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018215001947

(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 17 Apr 17:10 2015
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Could Carcharodontosaurus lift a sauropod?

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A new online paper:

Donald M. Henderson and Robert Nicholls (2015)
Balance and strength - estimating the maximum prey lifting potential
of the large predatory dinosaur Carcharodontosaurus saharicus.
The Anatomical Record (advance online publication)
DOI: 10.1002/ar.23164
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.23164/abstract

Motivated by the work of palaeo-art “Double Death (2011)”, a
biomechanical analysis using three-dimensional digital models was
conducted to assess the potential of a pair of the large, Late
Cretaceous theropod dinosaur Carcharodontosaurus saharicus to
successfully lift a medium-sized sauropod and not lose balance.
Rayosaurus tessonei from the Late Cretaceous of South America was
chosen as the sauropod as it is more completely known, but closely
related to the rebbachisaurid sauropods found in the same deposits
with C. saharicus. The body models incorporate details of the low
density regions associated with lungs, systems of air sacs, and
pneumatised axial skeletal regions. These details, along with the
surface meshes of the models, were used to estimate the body masses
and centres of mass of the two animals. It was found that a 6 t C.
saharicus could successfully lift a mass of 2.5 t and not lose balance
as the combined CM of the body and the load in the jaws would still be
over the feet. However, the neck muscles were found to only be capable
of producing enough force to hold up the head with an added mass of
424 kg held at the midpoint of the maxillary tooth row. The jaw
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 17 Apr 05:13 2015
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Guide to saurischian vertebral laminae + more news

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

Some recent news and blog items:

Guide to saurischian vertebral laminae  (with link to pdf)

http://svpow.com/2015/04/17/tutorial-4b-saurischian-vertebral-laminae-and-fossae-redux-by-adam-marsh/

===

Bone-eating worms that munched on plesiosaurs

http://pteroformer.blogspot.com/2015/04/mesozoic-marine-menu-bone.html

====

Brontosaurus renaming ceremony report

http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2015/04/16/with-rediscovery-of-dinosaur-species-peabody-renames-skeleton/

==

Terror birds overview

https://twilightbeasts.wordpress.com/2015/04/16/the-long-reign-of-terror/

==

New dinosaur track site found in British Columbia
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 16 Apr 20:14 2015
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Marine tetrapod evolution from Triassic to Anthropocene

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A new paper:

Neil P. Kelley and Nicholas D. Pyenson (2015)
Evolutionary innovation and ecology in marine tetrapods from the
Triassic to the Anthropocene.
Science  348(6232):  aaa3716
DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa3716
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/348/6232/aaa3716.abstract

BACKGROUND
More than 30 different lineages of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and
mammals have independently invaded oceans ecosystems. Prominent
examples include ichthyosaurs and mosasaurs during the Mesozoic (252
to 66 million years ago) and penguins and sea otters during the
Cenozoic (66 million years ago to the present). In today’s oceans,
marine tetrapods are ecologically important consumers with trophic
influence disproportionate to their abundance. They have occupied apex
roles in ocean food webs for more than 250 million years, through
major changes in ocean and climate, and through mass extinctions.
Major paleontological discoveries in the past 40 years have clarified
the early land-sea transitions for some marine tetrapods (e.g.,
whales, sea cows), although the terrestrial origins of many lineages
remain obscure. Incipient invasions appear frequently in marine
tetrapod history, but such early transitions account for only a small
proportion of the total fossil record of successful marine lineages,
which in some cases persist for hundreds of millions of years.

(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 15 Apr 21:41 2015
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New Mexico ankylosaur osteoderms + Eubrontes track from India + Bristol Dinosaur Project (free pdfs)

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A number of recent and not so recent dinosaur papers with free pdfs:

Michael E. Burns and Spencer G. Lucas (2015)
Biostratigraphy of ankylosaur (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) osteoderms
from New Mexico.
Fossil Record 4, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science
Bulletin 67: 9-13
Free pdf links:
https://www.academia.edu/11852161/Biostratigraphy_of_ankylosaur_osteoderms_from_New_Mexico
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Burns3/publication/274698450_Biostratigraphy_of_ankylosaur_osteoderms_from_New_Mexico/links/55256c2a0cf24b822b4039d7.pdf?inViewer=true

Several previously undescribed specimens of ankylosaur osteoderms from
New Mexico, allow for a revision of the biostratigraphic distribution
of New Mexican ankylosaur taxa. An osteoderm from the Upper Jurassic
Peterson Quarry (Morrison Formation, Brushy Basin Member) referable to
Gargoyleosaurus or Mymoorapelta represents the first reported
occurrence of Jurassic ankylosaur material in New Mexico. An
ankylosaurid osteoderm from the De-na-zin Member of the Kirtland
Formation is consistent with other ankylosaurid material previously
collected from the unit. Several osteoderm specimens collected from
the Fruitland Formation (Fossil Forest Member) are referable to the
nodosaurid Glyptodontopelta mimus. Previously known only from the
Maastrichtian Naashoibito Member of the Ojo Alamo Formation, these
specimens extend the stratigraphic range of the taxon back at least 5
My.

=====
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 15 Apr 20:54 2015
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Deinonychus Morphological Variations within Ontogeny

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

New in PLoS ONE:

William L. Parsons & Kristen M. Parsons (2015)
Morphological Variations within the Ontogeny of Deinonychus
antirrhopus (Theropoda, Dromaeosauridae).
PLoS ONE 10(4): e0121476.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0121476
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0121476

This research resulted from the determination that MCZ 8791 is a
specimen of Deinonychus antirrhopus between one and two years of age
and that the morphological variations within particular growth stages
of this taxon have yet to be described. The primary goal of the
research is to identify ontogenetic variations in this taxon.
Histological analyses determined that the Deinonychus specimens AMNH
3015 and MOR 1178 were adults. Comparisons are made between MCZ 8791
and these adult specimens. The holotype, YPM 5205, and the other
associated specimens of this taxon within the YPM collection are
similar in size and morphology to AMNH 3015. Further comparisons were
made with the three partial specimens OMNH 50268, MCZ 4371, and MOR
1182. Although these specimens represent only a partial ontogenetic
series, a number of morphological variations can be described. One
secondary goal of this research is to compare the known pattern of
variable, informative, ontogenetic characters in MCZ 8791 to a similar
pattern of morphological characters in the sub-adult dromaeosaurid
specimen Bambiraptor feinbergorum, AMNH FR: 30556. If the characters
that have been determined to represent variable juvenile morphology in
(Continue reading)

Ben Creisler | 15 Apr 18:14 2015
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Dinosaur mineralized tissues formation through metaplasia

Ben Creisler
bcreisler <at> gmail.com

A new online paper:

John R. Horner, Holly N. Woodward & Alida M. Bailleul (2015)
Mineralized tissues in dinosaurs interpreted as having formed through
metaplasia: A preliminary evaluation.
Comptes Rendus Palevol (advance online publication)
doi:10.1016/j.crpv.2015.01.006
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1631068315000378

Evolutionary biologists define “metaplasia” as the permanent
transformation of a cell identity, and there are many examples of such
transformations in living vertebrates (e.g., chondrocytes transforming
directly into osteoblasts). These metaplasias have been observed
during the mineralization of “ossified” tendons of living birds. In
the present study, we examined “ossified” tendons in Bubo and
Meleagris and used the characteristics of these metaplastic tissues to
recognize them in several non-avian dinosaur taxa. The fossilized
skeletal elements that form our sample are varied and include
hadrosaurian tendons and a nasal bone, an ankylosaur tail club
“handle”, sauropod neural spines, and some dromaeosaur tail rods. The
extant avian mineralized tendons were formed of a primary tissue
(analogous to primary bone) and secondary reconstructions (SRs;
analogous to secondary osteons). Both were composed of fiber bundles
(or fascicles) that were closely packed together and separated by
arc-shaped spaces in cross-section. When viewed longitudinally, they
were arranged in a herringbone pattern. There is no evidence of
osteocytes within the primary tendon matrix; what was previously
(Continue reading)


Gmane