charles christ | 1 Nov 11:13 2010
Picon

Re: Re: who's got one?



since i do not have a grill shade  assembly behind my grill , i've had problems with water in my distributor at times.   i thought the factory distributor cover along with a wire tie around the botom would seal up the assembly enough to get through an event without having to stop and dry out (and off) the cap & rotor.    bruce's glove set up sounds even better.    evryone is determined to vent the distributor either via the cowel vent tube (on long nose cars) or drilling a hole on the back side of the distributor cap.     i'm trying to do the exact opposite.    lacking a grill shade assembly i do have an improvised duct tape baffle wi re tied to the grill.    but i still am victim of moisture build up if racing in the rain.  
 
chuck
93F #251 

From: Bruce <sonett1-/1bC63wxbnDD0D/r9Z6QQA@public.gmane.org>
To: vSAAB-hHKSG33TihhbjbujkaE4pw@public.gmane.org
Sent: Sun, October 31, 2010 6:04:13 PM
Subject: [vSAAB] Re: who's got one?

 



> > > ok i have a part numbered #708704 distributor cover. i'd like >>>one for the race car and i'm positive bruce , you'd love one too!
> > > chuck

Chuck,
I have two of them (NOS) but they are open around the bottom edge so they can still allow water to splash up inside. I use a latex surgical glove with the finger tips cut off to allow the wires to come up through. The glove is water tight around the base of the distributor and I tape the finger tips tight around the wires. This arrangement will last until you have to remove it.

Bruce T
http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=11284&id=1110854912&l=d5311732fc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHcp_I0i6sk




__._,_.___

Your email settings: Individual Email|Traditional
Change settings via the Web (Yahoo! ID required)
Change settings via email: Switch delivery to Daily Digest | Switch to Fully Featured
Visit Your Group | Yahoo! Groups Terms of Use | Unsubscribe

__,_._,___
Andy Peterson | 1 Nov 11:44 2010
Picon

Re: Re: who's got one?

On 11/1/2010 2:13 AM, charles christ wrote:
> since i do not have a grill shade assembly behind my grill , i've had
> problems with water in my distributor at times. i thought the factory
> distributor cover along with a wire tie around the botom would seal up
> the assembly enough to get through an event without having to stop and
> dry out (and off) the cap & rotor. bruce's glove set up sounds even
> better. evryone is determined to vent the distributor either via the
> cowel vent tube (on long nose cars) or drilling a hole on the back side
> of the distributor cap. i'm trying to do the exact opposite. lacking a
> grill shade assembly i do have an improvised duct tape baffle wire tied
> to the grill. but i still am victim of moisture build up if racing in
> the rain.

An old friend of mine who owned a two-stroke used to carry a dry set of 
wires on a dry distributor cap under the back seat. If he started to 
have misfiring problems He'd release the hood, jump out with the dry cap 
and wires, swap them, and throw the wet one on the floor. he could do 
this very quickly.

When I lived in New Hampshire, we used to have a salesman come around 
who carried a line by Curtis Industries. They had something called 
"Watershed" that we used to use on ignition wires. I limped to work one 
day in a snow storm and when I got there, I pulled the wires and cap off 
the car and took them inside to dry out. I cleaned the CRC 5-6-5 off 
with electrical degreaser and sprayed the wires and cap with the 
Watershed, and drove the rest of the winter without any misfiring or 
fouled plugs.

Curtis Industries doesn't seem to exist anymore and I haven't seen the 
stuff for years. (My ex wife used up my last can on our '79 900 GLE.) A 
guy I worked with a few years after New Hampshire bought a can at the 
Mercedes dealer on Commonwealth Avenue in Boston. He had an old Buick 
that wouldn't start one morning because the wires were wet, and he 
drained the battery trying to start it. I stopped by after work to jump 
start him off my old Volvo, and when he cranked it, I could see sparks 
jumping all over the top of that V-8. One shot of Watershed down each 
bank of wires, and the car started right up without any misfires.

Two things I'd like to have on my chemicals shelf here at home ... 
Watershed and SWEPCO 808 penetrating oil with moly. Can't find one, and 
can't afford the other right now.

Andy in PDX OR

------------------------------------

xherrmann | 1 Nov 14:13 2010
Picon

Re: I am new here.

Thanks for the welcome. 

Hopefully I don't wear that welcome out due to my proficiency at filling up everyone's screens with words.
Sometimes my writing isn't as good as I'd like it to be; like when I seemed to suggest there had already been
valve seats installed in my heads. 
The machine shop stopped after disassembling them and I was told they couldn't find the 2.8 liter V6 valves
anymore. Is there a source someone knows of?

Xenon
1971 Saab 96
San Francisco area

--- In vSAAB@..., Andy Peterson <adpete <at> ...> wrote:
>
> Welcome to the list, Xenon. Sounds as though you've got a lot of 
> experience with these cars and have ideas to offer others. I've been 
> driving and working on SAABs for over 40 years. My driver right now is a 
> '79 900 turbo, and there's nothing in my stable newer than 1980.
> 
> I had a customer's car years ago that was blowing water out the radiator 
> bottle, and I put a cooling system pressure tester on it, and cranked 
> the engine over. The result was that the needle on the radiator tester 
> was pegged.
> 
> I hadn't experienced that pipe rusting shut, but can see how it could. I 
> think it is a bypass for when the thermostat is closed.
> 
> I don't know what seats your machine shop put in, but the usual 
> replacement has been valves for the Capri 2.6L V-6. They're slightly 
> bigger than the original valves.
> 
> I had the inlet tube on my OEM Solex on my '67 V-4 come out, resulting 
> in a small fire on the top of the engine. I also have a customer who has 
> a Weber on his one-owner '72 96 that had the same problem. I used a glue 
> that won't dissolve in fuel, to put it back in. It was wired on, but was 
> leaking.
> 
> Andy in PDX OR
> 
> On 10/27/2010 10:23 AM, xherrmann wrote:
> > I am new to this forum but I am not new to wrenching on old Saabs.
> > I've been the sole mechanic on my 1971 Saab 96 for 20 years, and also
> > work on a few others of similar vintage.
> >
> > I have gotten pretty deep into my car over the years including
> > replacing the balance shaft and cam shaft bearings and rebuilding the
> > transmission.
> >
> > Recently I had an overheating problem and in addition to the
> > temperature gauge jumping around, much of the coolant was being
> > periodically forced out of the reservoir tank. I also noticed coolant
> > leaking out from the base of the left head near the stabilizer mount
> > and discovered the head bolt was loose; in fact the top couple inches
> > of the bolt was no longer connected to the part threaded into the
> > block.
> >
> > I figured that I had a broken head gasket and was going to have to
> > replace it, but since I now lack a garage in which to work I decided
> > to try a less ambitious course: so with great hope in my heart - and
> > the fair amount of skill with tools I've built up over the years - I
> > drilled a hole in the end of broken bolt and removed it using a
> > fluted extractor. I replaced the bolt with a spare I had and the leak
> > stopped but sadly the overheating and coolant blowout continued and
> > in the absence of an exhaust detection kit for the radiator I decided
> > I had a broken head gasket.
> >
> > But...  in the process of doing a shade-tree head gasket repair I
> > noticed a bunch of rusty water come out of a coolant tube as I
> > inverted it into a box. (I call this a bypass tube though perhaps it
> > is properly called something else: it is what leads from the
> > thermostat housing past the alternator back to the water pump.
> > Naturally it was completely clogged and digging all the junk out of
> > the part of the tube which is formed inwardly at the bend and where
> > the internal diameter is reduced has solved the overheating problem.
> >
> > I have this question though: my local machine shop disassembled the
> > spare heads I had to rework them and put in hardened seats and
> > guides, but the fellow couldn't find new valves. Are these available
> > anywhere? (I spent a bit of time searching this site and found a
> > reference to using the good valves from two engines, so I think I
> > know the answer.)
> >
> > I still have the FoMoCo 1250 carb which was badly warped but I filed
> > the two halves carefully together. When I first worked on the car I
> > scoffed at the baling wire tying the fuel inlet hose clamp to the
> > body of this carb - and *removed* *it* - but few months later learned
> > how the brass tube is simply press-fit into the casting and can pop
> > out at any time. I cursed myself and replaced the wire. Recently I
> > earned some money resurrecting a '72 model 95 which had burned up
> > because its mechanic didn't know of that issue. (The alternator belt
> > had been overtightened as well.)
>

------------------------------------

charles christ | 1 Nov 14:43 2010
Picon

Re: Electric Fuel Pump Installed, and Question?



chevy vega did have a low oil pressure switch that upon recieving  "low pressure" would cut out the electric fuel  pump.  
 
 
chuck
93F  #251
From: Andy Peterson <adpete-RZgiYSjP1Ds@public.gmane.org>
To: vSAAB-hHKSG33TihhbjbujkaE4pw@public.gmane.org
Sent: Sun, October 31, 2010 4:08:34 PM
Subject: Re: [vSAAB] Electric Fuel Pump Installed, and Question?

 

On 10/30/2010 2:54 PM, MH wrote:
> Here's another schematic diagram for the electric pump;
> http://home.kpn.nl/m.hilvers/techtip/fuelpump.jpg

I never quite figured out how they wired it, but I've worked on cars on
Which the electric fuel pump shut off when the oil pressure dropped
enough to turn on the lamp on the dash board. I'm vaguely thinking of
the Chevy Vega.

Andy in PDX OR




__._,_.___

Your email settings: Individual Email|Traditional
Change settings via the Web (Yahoo! ID required)
Change settings via email: Switch delivery to Daily Digest | Switch to Fully Featured
Visit Your Group | Yahoo! Groups Terms of Use | Unsubscribe

__,_._,___
Bill Trench | 1 Nov 15:22 2010
Picon

Re: Electric Fuel Pump Installed, and Question?

so your car's been sitting for a while and the bowl has gone low, how do 
you get it running if the fuel pump won't come on until the motor starts 
and the oil pressure goes up ?

charles christ wrote:
>
>
> chevy vega did have a low oil pressure switch that upon recieving  
> "low pressure" would cut out the electric fuel  pump.  
>  
>  
> _,_._,___

------------------------------------

Tony Brooks | 1 Nov 15:26 2010
Picon
Picon

Re: Re: I am new here.



Not sure about the states but plenty available here
 
 
with lots of other useful inforamtion
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: xherrmann
Sent: Monday, November 01, 2010 1:13 PM
Subject: [vSAAB] Re: I am new here.

 

Thanks for the welcome.

Hopefully I don't wear that welcome out due to my proficiency at filling up everyone's screens with words. Sometimes my writing isn't as good as I'd like it to be; like when I seemed to suggest there had already been valve seats installed in my heads.
The machine shop stopped after disassembling them and I was told they couldn't find the 2.8 liter V6 valves anymore. Is there a source someone knows of?

Xenon
1971 Saab 96
San Francisco area

--- In vSAAB-hHKSG33TihhbjbujkaE4pw@public.gmane.org, Andy Peterson <adpete <at> ...> wrote:
>
> Welcome to the list, Xenon. Sounds as though you've got a lot of
> experience with these cars and have ideas to offer others. I've been
> driving and working on SAABs for over 40 years. My driver right now is a
> '79 900 turbo, and there's nothing in my stable newer than 1980.
>
> I had a customer's car years ago that was blowing water out the radiator
> bottle, and I put a cooling system pressure tester on it, and cranked
> the engine over. The result was that the needle on the radiator tester
> was pegged.
>
> I hadn't experienced that pipe rusting shut, but can see how it could. I
> think it is a bypass for when the thermostat is closed.
>
> I don't know what seats your machine shop put in, but the usual
> replacement has been valves for the Capri 2.6L V-6. They're slightly
> bigger than the original valves.
>
> I had the inlet tube on my OEM Solex on my '67 V-4 come out, resulting
> in a small fire on the top of the engine. I also have a customer who has
> a Weber on his one-owner '72 96 that had the same problem. I used a glue
> that won't dissolve in fuel, to put it back in. It was wired on, but was
> leaking.
>
> Andy in PDX OR
>
> On 10/27/2010 10:23 AM, xherrmann wrote:
> > I am new to this forum but I am not new to wrenching on old Saabs.
> > I've been the sole mechanic on my 1971 Saab 96 for 20 years, and also
> > work on a few others of similar vintage.
> >
> > I have gotten pretty deep into my car over the years including
> > replacing the balance shaft and cam shaft bearings and rebuilding the
> > transmission.
> >
> > Recently I had an overheating problem and in addition to the
> > temperature gauge jumping around, much of the coolant was being
> > periodically forced out of the reservoir tank. I also noticed coolant
> > leaking out from the base of the left head near the stabilizer mount
> > and discovered the head bolt was loose; in fact the top couple inches
> > of the bolt was no longer connected to the part threaded into the
> > block.
> >
> > I figured that I had a broken head gasket and was going to have to
> > replace it, but since I now lack a garage in which to work I decided
> > to try a less ambitious course: so with great hope in my heart - and
> > the fair amount of skill with tools I've built up over the years - I
> > drilled a hole in the end of broken bolt and removed it using a
> > fluted extractor. I replaced the bolt with a spare I had and the leak
> > stopped but sadly the overheating and coolant blowout continued and
> > in the absence of an exhaust detection kit for the radiator I decided
> > I had a broken head gasket.
> >
> > But... in the process of doing a shade-tree head gasket repair I
> > noticed a bunch of rusty water come out of a coolant tube as I
> > inverted it into a box. (I call this a bypass tube though perhaps it
> > is properly called something else: it is what leads from the
> > thermostat housing past the alternator back to the water pump.
> > Naturally it was completely clogged and digging all the junk out of
> > the part of the tube which is formed inwardly at the bend and where
> > the internal diameter is reduced has solved the overheating problem.
> >
> > I have this question though: my local machine shop disassembled the
> > spare heads I had to rework them and put in hardened seats and
> > guides, but the fellow couldn't find new valves. Are these available
> > anywhere? (I spent a bit of time searching this site and found a
> > reference to using the good valves from two engines, so I think I
> > know the answer.)
> >
> > I still have the FoMoCo 1250 carb which was badly warped but I filed
> > the two halves carefully together. When I first worked on the car I
> > scoffed at the baling wire tying the fuel inlet hose clamp to the
> > body of this carb - and *removed* *it* - but few months later learned
> > how the brass tube is simply press-fit into the casting and can pop
> > out at any time. I cursed myself and replaced the wire. Recently I
> > earned some money resurrecting a '72 model 95 which had burned up
> > because its mechanic didn't know of that issue. (The alternator belt
> > had been overtightened as well.)
>





__._,_.___

Your email settings: Individual Email|Traditional
Change settings via the Web (Yahoo! ID required)
Change settings via email: Switch delivery to Daily Digest | Switch to Fully Featured
Visit Your Group | Yahoo! Groups Terms of Use | Unsubscribe

__,_._,___
xherrmann | 1 Nov 15:26 2010
Picon

Re: Electric Fuel Pump Installed, and Question?


http://home.kpn.nl/m.hilvers/techtip/fuelpump.jpg
The circuit shown in the link would not only provide protection against damage from losing oil pressure,
but could also serve as a theft prevention system too if the push button switch were hidden: as-is in the
case of fuel injected vehicles, or with some modification for older carbureted vehicles.

The schematic shows the battery on the left with negative terminal grounded and the positive terminal
connected through the ignition switch and fuse box to a parallel-wired oil pressure light and cut-out
relay coil; the circuit being completed when the normally closed oil pressure switch on the left is not
being held open by oil pressure in the engine.

Shown immediately below the cut-out relay coil is the relay's normally closed contact powering the fuel
pump through the same circuit, and below that in parallel with the relay contact is a normally open push
button switch.

To provide theft prevention on a carbureted engine the relay could be a double pole relay with the second set
of contacts used to make the relay self-holding. Then the push button switch could be a normally closed
contact and located on wire 85. The button would need to be held in while the engine is started to keep the
relay from pulling in.

--- In vSAAB@..., Andy Peterson <adpete <at> ...> wrote:
>
> On 10/30/2010 2:54 PM, MH wrote:
> > Here's another schematic diagram for the electric pump;
> > http://home.kpn.nl/m.hilvers/techtip/fuelpump.jpg
> 
> I never quite figured out how they wired it, but I've worked on cars on 
> Which the electric fuel pump shut off when the oil pressure dropped 
> enough to turn on the lamp on the dash board. I'm vaguely thinking of 
> the Chevy Vega.
> 
> Andy in PDX OR
>

------------------------------------

xherrmann | 1 Nov 15:35 2010
Picon

Re: Electric Fuel Pump Installed, and Question?


http://home.kpn.nl/m.hilvers/techtip/fuelpump.jpg

The circuit shown in the link would not only provide protection against damage from losing oil pressure,
but could also serve as a theft prevention system too if the push button switch were hidden: as-is in the
case of fuel injected vehicles, or with some modification for older carbureted vehicles.

The schematic shows the battery on the left with negative terminal grounded and the positive terminal
connected through the ignition switch and fuse box to a parallel-wired oil pressure light and cut-out
relay coil; the circuit being completed when the normally closed oil pressure switch on the left is not
being held open by oil pressure in the engine.

Shown immediately below the cut-out relay coil is the relay's normally closed contact powering the fuel
pump through the same circuit, and below that in parallel with the relay contact is a normally open push
button switch.

To provide theft prevention on a carbureted engine the relay could be a double pole relay with the second set
of contacts used to make the relay self-holding. Then the push button switch could be a normally closed
contact and located on wire 85. The button would need to be held in while the engine is started to keep the
relay from pulling in.

--- In vSAAB@..., charles christ <crusaderchuck <at> ...> wrote:
>
> chevy vega did have a low oil pressure switch that upon recieving  "low 
> pressure" would cut out the electric fuel  pump.   
> 
> 
> 
> 
> chuck
> 93F  #251
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: Andy Peterson <adpete <at> ...>
> To: vSAAB@...
> Sent: Sun, October 31, 2010 4:08:34 PM
> Subject: Re: [vSAAB] Electric Fuel Pump Installed, and Question?
> 
>   
> On 10/30/2010 2:54 PM, MH wrote:
> > Here's another schematic diagram for the electric pump;
> > http://home.kpn.nl/m.hilvers/techtip/fuelpump.jpg
> 
> I never quite figured out how they wired it, but I've worked on cars on 
> Which the electric fuel pump shut off when the oil pressure dropped 
> enough to turn on the lamp on the dash board. I'm vaguely thinking of 
> the Chevy Vega.
> 
> Andy in PDX OR
>

------------------------------------

xherrmann | 1 Nov 15:45 2010
Picon

Re: Electric Fuel Pump Installed, and Question?

This correct an earlier post I deleted:

The circuit shown in the link shown previously ( http://home.kpn.nl/m.hilvers/techtip/fuelpump.jpg )
would provide protection against damage from losing oil pressure.

The schematic shows the battery on the left with negative terminal grounded and the positive terminal
connected through the ignition switch and fuse box to a parallel-wired oil pressure light and cut-out
relay coil; the circuit being completed when the normally closed oil pressure switch on the left is not
being held open by oil pressure in the engine.

Shown immediately below the cut-out relay coil is the relay's normally closed contact powering the fuel
pump through the same circuit, and below that in parallel with the relay contact is a normally open push
button switch which could be used to operate the vehicle with low oil pressure in case of desparate need or
in the case that oil pressure would not be sufficient during cranking.

--- In vSAAB@..., Bill Trench <btren <at> ...> wrote:
>
> so your car's been sitting for a while and the bowl has gone low, how do 
> you get it running if the fuel pump won't come on until the motor starts 
> and the oil pressure goes up ?
> 
> charles christ wrote:
> >
> >
> > chevy vega did have a low oil pressure switch that upon recieving  
> > "low pressure" would cut out the electric fuel  pump.  
> >  
> >  
> > _,_._,___
>

------------------------------------

xherrmann | 1 Nov 15:47 2010
Picon

Re: Electric Fuel Pump Installed, and Question?

http://home.kpn.nl/m.hilvers/techtip/fuelpump.jpg

This corrects an earlier post I deleted:

The circuit shown in the link would provide protection against damage from losing oil pressure.

The schematic shows the battery on the left with negative terminal grounded and the positive terminal
connected through the ignition switch and fuse box to a parallel-wired oil pressure light and cut-out
relay coil; the circuit being completed when the normally closed oil pressure switch on the left is not
being held open by oil pressure in the engine.

Shown immediately below the cut-out relay coil is the relay's normally closed contact powering the fuel
pump through the same circuit, and below that in parallel with the relay contact is a normally open push
button switch which could be used to operate the vehicle with low oil pressure in case of desperate need or
if the oil pressure was not sufficient during cranking. 

--- In vSAAB@..., Bill Trench <btren <at> ...> wrote:
>
> so your car's been sitting for a while and the bowl has gone low, how do 
> you get it running if the fuel pump won't come on until the motor starts 
> and the oil pressure goes up ?
> 
> charles christ wrote:
> >
> >
> > chevy vega did have a low oil pressure switch that upon recieving  
> > "low pressure" would cut out the electric fuel  pump.  
> >  
> >  
> > _,_._,___
>

------------------------------------


Gmane