Josh Creel | 1 Nov 02:45 2008
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Large motor on Ebay, was Small 3 phase 36 V motor


Does anyone know what kind of motor this is?  He's has some large claims 
about it.....

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=230303424441&indexURL=0&photoDisplayType=2#ebayphotohosting

Josh and Jen

www.jcsevparts.com

Josh Creel | 1 Nov 03:33 2008
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Re: Lectra VR24 for sale.

What do you want for it?

Josh and Jen

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Seth Allen" <seth.allen3@...>
To: <ev@...>
Sent: Friday, October 31, 2008 9:36 AM
Subject: [EVDL] Lectra VR24 for sale.

> Selling an EMB Lectra VR24. I bought it anticipating a change in my 
> commute
> which didn't happen.(Which is why I am planning to convert something 
> bigger)
> I have $1600 into this. It has 4 new batteries, with about 3 discharges on
> them. Speedo doesn't work. Titled, registered and inspected in NH as a
> motorcycle. But I think you could argue it as a scooter, as a Honda
> Metropolitan is only a touch slower.
>
> details here:
>
> http://www.electricmotorbike.org/index.php?page=lectra
>
> Located in Southern NH.
>
> Seth

EVDL Administrator | 1 Nov 03:52 2008
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Re: Battery SOC/Discharge question

On 31 Oct 2008 at 15:38, Robert MacDowell wrote:

> My view is batteries for a homebrew EV'er should be bulletproof and 
> idiot-proof.

A fine goal, but based on the many years of discussion I've read right here, 
not too many homebrew EV hobbyists would pay for the bulletproofing (we 
won't discuss the other adjective ;-).  

I don't mean to disparage anyone -- the fact is that for many EV hobbyists 
cost is, of not the highest priority, one of the highest.  They're looking 
for the cheapest possible charger, the cheapest possible battery, the 
cheapest possible everything.  They may be thinking in terms of cost per 
mile of use, or (more commonly) in terms of upfront cost, which affects how 
they budget for the EV assembly.

There are plenty of examples in archived threads from this list -- 
discussions where it's clear that other considerations take a back seat to 
low cost.

Thus I think that for EV hobbyists to be enthusiastic about a "bulletproof" 
battery, it can't cost very much, if anything, more than a conventional 
battery.  But I'd love to be proven wrong!

David Roden - Akron, Ohio, USA
EVDL Administrator

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
EVDL Information: http://www.evdl.org/help/
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(Continue reading)

Dan Bentler | 1 Nov 04:41 2008
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Re: Battery SOC/Discharge question

Those of us in the maintenance field really appreciate the job security American advertising and the
consumer give to us with the terms
Maintenance Free
Never needs ,,,,,,,,,,
Plug play forget

Just love it.  Thank you for the job security.

That is not the case with any battery BTW electrolyte levels (if wet) must be checked, charge voltage and
current carefully controlled, discharge carefully done.
IF NOT 
come and see me to replace equipment.  Need the income and job security.

Dan Bentler

--- On Fri, 10/31/08, EVDL Administrator <evpost@...> wrote:

> From: EVDL Administrator <evpost@...>
> Subject: Re: [EVDL] Battery SOC/Discharge question
> To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@...>
> Date: Friday, October 31, 2008, 7:52 PM
> On 31 Oct 2008 at 15:38, Robert MacDowell wrote:
> 
> > My view is batteries for a homebrew EV'er should
> be bulletproof and 
> > idiot-proof.
> 
> A fine goal, but based on the many years of discussion
> I've read right here, 
> not too many homebrew EV hobbyists would pay for the
(Continue reading)

Robert MacDowell | 1 Nov 05:17 2008
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Re: Battery SOC/Discharge question

I was thinking more in terms of crash recovery.  If you botch lead acid 
NiMH, LiPo, you get {dead battery; explosion}.

Dan Bentler wrote:
> 
> 
> --- On Fri, 10/31/08, EVDL Administrator <evpost@...> wrote:
> 
>> From: EVDL Administrator <evpost@...> Subject: Re: [EVDL]
>> Battery SOC/Discharge question To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion
>> List" <ev@...> Date: Friday, October 31, 2008, 7:52 PM 
>> On 31 Oct 2008 at 15:38, Robert MacDowell wrote:
>> 
>>> My view is batteries for a homebrew EV'er should
>> be bulletproof and
>>> idiot-proof.
>> A fine goal, but based on the many years of discussion I've read
>> right here, not too many homebrew EV hobbyists would pay for the 
>> bulletproofing (we won't discuss the other adjective ;-).

Well, if the technology is tolerant of those folks we won't discuss :) 
then it becomes practicable for same folks to join our ranks :)

As it is, I'm fairly scared off by the prospect of wrecking a $1500 
battery pack through a mistake on my part.  Or worse, smoke a Zilla.

How much extra would you pay for a motor controller with internal 
protections so essentially there's no way you can get magic smoke out of 
it?   How much more viable of a product would that be?   What if every 
part in the EV was available "bulletproof"?
(Continue reading)

Daniel Eyk | 1 Nov 05:35 2008
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EV Car and Log Truck Accident in Eugene

I listened to the POD Cast about this accident and lived in Eugene for a few years. Marcola Road is a two lane
road and if the Gem was on the left shoulder when hit, the log truck was further off beyond the shoulder
clearing trees as it is a tree lined forested area. I don't know about any retirement community there as it
has been about 40 years since I lived there, but definitely have driven that road. I do hope that the GEM
driver recovers okay. 

Daniel Eyk
Vancouver, Wa.

Electric S-10 project
E-15 project
E8M

Robert MacDowell | 1 Nov 06:04 2008
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Re: EV Car and Log Truck Accident in Eugene

Daniel Eyk wrote:
> I listened to the POD Cast about this accident and lived in Eugene
> for a few years. Marcola Road is a two lane road and if the Gem was
> on the left shoulder when hit, the log truck was further off beyond
> the shoulder clearing trees as it is a tree lined forested area. I
> don't know about any retirement community there as it has been about
> 40 years since I lived there, but definitely have driven that road. I
> do hope that the GEM driver recovers okay.

If it's the podcast I'm thinking of, they seemed very confused about 
what happened.   From other things I read, the podcast got a key fact or 
two wrong, it was a very conventional accident.

Two lane road, no dedicated turning lane, both vehicles going same 
direction.  Truck following.  The electric had either put his turn 
signal on "awfully early" (so says the truck driver) or perhaps had left 
it on.  The trucker thus assumed the left turn signal was on 
erroneously.  He crossed into the opposing-traffic lane to overtake.  At 
that moment the EV made a left turn, right into the path of the truck.

Robert

Kelly Hales | 1 Nov 06:20 2008

old lawnmower motor for bike conversion

Happy HOWLoween all,

A while back I scrapped an old black and decker corded electric mower.  I only kept the motor, switch and cord. 
I have been trying to find some info on it online with no luck except that I can get a new replacement for about
140 bucks (DeWalt part 242238-01).  I am wondering if I could put together an electric bike conversion.  I
have no idea of it's specs.  It is 110 volt AC supply but is a permenant magnet brushed motor.  It has an old
Motorola bridge rectifyer (SDA 10206, can't find online either) on it along with a large resistor (I
think).  I have no idea what speed it runs at, and really have limited experience on what the rectifyer does
to the input voltage.  I read up on them a bit online but couldn't find if the DC voltage would be 110 or not. 
Anyway I would run it on 24-36 volt
 s and find a controller (not run right off the pack).  Probably run a chain off the left side of the rear wheel
using a disc brake hub on the bike, with the motor on a rack above.  I don't !
 know if the thing will have enough guts or at what speed it runs.  Any Ideas?
Thanks
Kelly

PS Lots of great info flies about on this list, I have learned much.  I haven't posted much unless I have
something that is helpful, unfortunatly that is rarely to do with the EV aspects of the cars, but
mechanical stuff.  I just want to thank you all for the education.
James Massey | 1 Nov 06:37 2008
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Re: Large motor on Ebay,

At 12:45 PM 1/11/08, you wrote:

>Does anyone know what kind of motor this is?  He's has some large claims
>about it.....
>
>http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=230303424441&indexURL=0&photoDisplayType=2#ebayphotohosting
>
>Josh and Jen

Looks very like a GE motor, the terminals, fan cover and end bell all look 
very like how GE do things.

He states it to have an 11" casing diameter, and enormouse output [ how 
many mice in an enormouse? ;^) ]

Max amps for any motor is a function of brush size, conductor area. 450A x 
144V = 64.8kW, approx 86hp input, at 90% efficiency = 77hp from the shaft, 
so a reasonable number there. Full power at 450A? So if I hook up a Zilla 
and push 1500A from it then I won't get any more? (blows a raspberry).

Since it has a splined output shaft it'd be a bit of a pain to use, 1-5/16" 
diameter spline - presumably to the top of the spline. Stick the rotor in a 
cylindrical grinder or a lathe (depending on hardness of shaft) and take 
off the spline to be able to put a flywheel adaptor on it and you'd be down 
to more like 1-1/8" or less, so the output shaft is really the size of a 9".

As long as the price doesn't get silly it looks like a good motor, but in 
need of a little more work than a plain shaft ADC etc. As long as the price 
stayed below that of a new 9" you'd be getting a reasonable deal.

(Continue reading)

James Massey | 1 Nov 06:53 2008
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Re: old lawnmower motor for bike conversion

At 04:20 PM 1/11/08, Kelly wrote:

>A while back I scrapped an old black and decker corded electric mower.  I 
>only kept the motor, switch and cord.  I have been trying to find some 
>info on it online with no luck except that I can get a new replacement for 
>about 140 bucks (DeWalt part 242238-01).  I am wondering if I could put 
>together an electric bike conversion.  I have no idea of it's specs.  It 
>is 110 volt AC supply but is a permenant magnet brushed motor.  It has an 
>old Motorola bridge rectifyer (SDA 10206, can't find online either) on it 
>along with a large resistor (I think).  I have no idea what speed it runs 
>at, and really have limited experience on what the rectifyer does to the 
>input voltage.  I read up on them a bit online but couldn't find if the DC 
>voltage would be 110 or not.  Anyway I would run it on 24-36 volts and 
>find a controller (not run right off the pack).  Probably run a chain off 
>the left side of the rear wheel using a disc brake hub on the bike, with 
>the motor on a rack above.  I don't know if the thing will have enough 
>guts or at what speed it runs.  Any Ideas?

G'day Kelly

Being a corded mower, that motor will run at 10 to 15 amps. More than that 
would be burning it up, amps-wise. 36V at 15A is about 500watts, short term 
over-driving (over amps) is probably in the order of 30 seconds at 30A 
before the brush temps reach the point of brush breakdown. Not only that, 
but permag tries to run at a speed that is proportional to voltage, so 36V 
being about 1/3 of 110V it'll want to run at about 1/3 of the original 
speed. You can fire that motor up from a 36V power supply (or three car 
batteries in series) and get a pretty good idea what maximum speed it will 
be running at. Try and go faster than that and it'll generate giving you 
dynamic braking.
(Continue reading)


Gmane