Alan Wickman | 1 Oct 01:06 2004

Rail trails covered with leaves

Ray Scott notes about the Katy Trail that, "the trees are starting to change
colors here in Missouri, and any Katy Trail rides over the next few weeks
should be quite scenic."

My wife and I rode about half of the Katy Trail two years ago, including the
stretch mentioned, and we thought it was nice.  One thing that I've wondered
about a late fall ride there, however, is whether the trail ever gets
dangerously difficult to see with all of the leaves that must fall on it.
It just struck me that the Katy Trail was more surrounded by mature trees
than the several rail trails near to where I live.

I guess that this question could apply a bit more generally; that is,
whether rail trails surrounded with a heavy growth of mature trees tend to
have any problems in the fall because of the leaves making the trail surface
harder to see.  The couple of rail trails near to me that I ride regularly
just don't have the same degree of tree cover as does the Katy.

Alan Wickman
Lincoln, Nebraska

Doug | 1 Oct 01:07 2004
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Re: Camp showers (was Cross Canada...)

Moni wrote:
>Ryan, what about clean up?  My main problem with free camping is clean 
>up.  I so enjoy a shower, or at least a dip in a lake or stream after a 
>ride. 
>
>What I see in free camping is pitching late, to not be seen.  Usually, 
>this means, the temps dropped, and a dip will make you feel so cold.
>
>I guess, I am to hung up on "clean"?

Nothing beats a shower at the end of the day, but that's not the only option:  you don't have to wait until the
end of the ride to clean up.   If it's warm during the day but cold at night, then look for a swim during the day. 
So what if there's still another X miles to camp?  At least you've removed some of the grunge, and maybe you
can ride a bit slower for those X miles so you don't completely undo the clean-up.  

BTW, the same goes for dinner -- you don't have to wait until camp to eat dinner, either.  One strategy for
stealth camping is to have your dip and/or dinner well before stopping for the night.  It makes stealth
camping that much more stealthy. 

doug
madison, wi

Ryan Yeske | 1 Oct 01:09 2004
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Re: FREE CAMPING

Estes Wayne-W10191 <W10191@...> writes:

> Back to the original topic, I agree that in many places it is
> difficult to find a guerilla campsite that is reasonably level and not
> overgrown with plants of some kind.

We talked the whole time about hammocks, in particular the Hennessey
Hammocks.  I believe there was a long thread about them just before we
left which was the first I'd heard of them.  They would have made
finding camping spots much much easier almost the whole way.

The only question is how dry do you stay, and how bug proof are they?

Ryan
Booker Bense | 1 Oct 01:33 2004
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Re: FREE CAMPING

On Thu, 30 Sep 2004, Michael A. French wrote:

> ------------------
>
> Gorilla style camping rules:  but it can be a stinking dirty
> wet and poison-ivy-filled experience.  I have yet to master the
> art of being clean for long periods just using the corner
> store's sink.

_ The baby wipe shower... Use baby wipes to wipe down all
accessible body parts. It's remarkably refreshing.

_ Booker C. Bense
Doug | 1 Oct 01:44 2004
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Re: hammock camping (was Free Camping)

Ryan asked:
>We talked the whole time about hammocks, in particular the Hennessey
>Hammocks.  I believe there was a long thread about them just before we
>left which was the first I'd heard of them.  They would have made
>finding camping spots much much easier almost the whole way.
>
>The only question is how dry do you stay, and how bug proof are they?

Yes, there's been a lot written about hammocks -- just check the archive (if it's back up).

To answer your question, I believe most people who camp in jungles, swamps and rain forests use hammocks
rather than tents, so I would conclude they are typically great at keeping the occupants dry and bug-free. 
Indeed, I've even read where some canoe-campers will pitch their hammock from their canoe; i.e., over
standing water.  I can't think of anyplace wetter and buggier.

doug
madison, wi

Moni | 1 Oct 02:12 2004
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free camping and clean up

I have free camped, and camped without showers.  But, most had a water 
source by them.  Guerilla camping would possibly not have this. 

I have used baby wipes, "swam" in rivers and lakes.  But, I also had a 
pretty sad seat rash, after my camping behind the Co-Op in Michigan.  
There was no water source, but I did have my mini shower filled.  The 
temperature was what kept me from using it.  I am just not as tough as 
Heidi!

No shower in the cold temps, is what caused me to use campgrounds.  A 
warm shower is just TOPS after a long day.  Besides, I really didn't 
want to spend the evening by myself, after riding all day by myself.  I 
do get bored with my own company after a bit.  :)

--

-- 
Don't cry because it's over; smile because it happened.

Moni

Jamie Noble | 1 Oct 02:23 2004
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Re: FREE CAMPING

Interesting that you should mention that because I was going to!

I've been out in an 80+ km/hr wind and rain storm in mine and stayed totally
dry. I use a Hennessy Hammock complete with the optional snake skins.

More bug proof then a tent in my opinion. Why? You open a slit in the bottom
for a brief instant to get in and then as you pull your legs up the slit
closes. Very little time for bugs to come in with you. Bug netting above
you. Some reports of mosquitos bites through the side. I use a thermarest
for insulation inside so I haven't had that problem. Hennessy is apparently
coming out with an optional attachment to take care of that problem.

An advantage of a hammock is that with two trees within 30 feet of each
other you can hoist the hammock without worrying about the slope of the
ground. There are some pictures of people using them from canoes in swamps.
The canoe is moored to the hammock and then the hammock is entered from the
water. I suspect that getting in to the hammock is a lot easier then getting
out!

The hammock is also camoflaged so it will fade into the background.

~Jamie (who is actually leaving tomorrow morning sometime).

~Jamie N
Jim Foreman | 1 Oct 01:43 2004
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Re: FREE CAMPING


-----Original Message-----
>>
>> Gorilla style camping rules:  but it can be a stinking dirty
>> wet and poison-ivy-filled experience.  I have yet to master the
>> art of being clean for long periods just using the corner
>> store's sink.<<<<

    If you get to smelling like a gorilla, perhaps that's why it's called
that :-) I prefer guerrilla camping.
Jim Foreman
jimfore@...
http://www.JimForeman.com

gneuburg | 1 Oct 02:58 2004
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RE: FREE CAMPING

At what point is guerrilla cycle camping (camping where prohibited and
possibly making use of someone else's utilities without paying a fee) more
ethical than the shopping cart campers I see when riding some bike trails?
Is it because cyclists don't (usually) have large black plastic bags full of
aluminum cans hanging from their bikes as they ride?

Jerry and Jeanette's Burley Baby
Tandem Team TH 4.662 (420*111)
2002 Burley Duet S&S
http://www.touringonbikes.us

Jim Foreman | 1 Oct 03:00 2004
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Re: Free camping

>>
>>Staying at a cemetary was on our list, but it never happened.  Have
>>many people done this?  Get into any trouble?  Was it creepy?<<<<

    I went back and checked the story about camping in a cemetery but it's
in the next chapter after the one I posted.
>http://www.jimforeman.com/Books/scarwaf/SCAR_ch10.htm

    It's at > http://www.jimforeman.com/Books/scarwaf/SCAR_ch11.htm

>
>Jim Foreman
>jimfore@...
>http://www.JimForeman.com


Gmane