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Your removal from the BEHAVIOR2000 list

Wed, 24 Apr 2002 14:04:16

You have been removed from  the BEHAVIOR2000 list (Behavior2000: Behavior
and Digital Technology List) by David Feeney <DavidFeeney <at> AOL.COM>.

JWESHLEMAN | 24 Apr 17:43 2002
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Re: The Fascinating Case of Marty Eisen

Anybody know more about the Marty Eisen case?

I just did a google.com search on "Marty Eisen" as the keywords,
and came up almost empty (got some neat links to some martial
arts pages, but.....).

William S. Verplanck | 23 Apr 23:23 2002
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Managing Difficult Conversations

Rolf Marvin requests advice on "difficult conversations."

This was readily available decades ago, in a book that anticipated many of
behavior analytic findings.  Dale Carnegie wrote it:

  "How to Make Friends and Influence People."

"Try it.   You'll like it," and you will be able to translate it directly
into p.c. beh. an. language!

W.S.V.
_____________________________________________
    William S. Verplanck          wverplan <at> utk.edu
  An award-winning site: http://web.utk.edu/~wverplan/
    http://web.utk.edu/~wverplan/kantor/kantor.html
_____________________________________________

JWESHLEMAN | 22 Apr 20:57 2002
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Re: Test/Examinations: The Eisen Effect

In a message dated 04/17/2002 6:05:46 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
wverplan <at> UTKUX.UTCC.UTK.EDU writes:

<< When we "explain" grading policies by appealing to Flexner, and to
 "corporate greed," forget about it. >>

Just an update:

Today's (Monday, April 22, 2002) USA Today has a front-page story
in Section B titled "Universities hire more executives to lead."  It's
subtitled, "More taking slots once reserved for academics."

The article describes how more universities are hiring executives
direct from the corporate business world to run said universities.
The share is still small, but it's grown from 2% in 1986 to 3.2%
today.

The article suggests that the corporate executives are "better
equipped to deal with 21st-century higher education challenges."
It adds that "universities need new sources of revenue as
government support dwindles.  There's also more competition
for students and more complex labor issues, such as unions
organizing graduate students."

In other words, the article underscores the points I made the
other day about the economic macrocontingencies.

  -- JE

REFERENCE:
(Continue reading)

DavidFeeney | 22 Apr 17:57 2002
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Meet Blackboard Chairman Matthew Pittinsky

Tuesday, April 23
10:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
President's Room, Diamond Club
http://sbm.temple.edu/banner.html

RSVP: tschumac <at> sbm.temple.edu

Matthew Pittinsky, Chairman of Blackboard, Inc., and editor of The Wired Tower: Perspectives of the Internet's Impact on Higher Education will present an overview of the book, as well as his view that the promise of e-learning lies in the reinforcement of the traditional living-learning community which has eroded over the last century.

Winner of The Fox School of Business's 2002 Information Technology Innovator of the Year, Matthew Pittinsky is cofounder of Blackboard and active leader in the field of e-learning. Industry analysts recognize Blackboard as the leading provider of e-education software infrastructure in the world, and Temple University is one of Blackboard's largest installations.

For more information, visit:
http://sbm.temple.edu/banner.html
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0130428299/qid=1018554412/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_5_1/002-1469244-0581640

My best,

Dr. David Feeney
DavidFeeney <at> aol.com
Director of Digital Education, http://foxonline.temple.edu
FOX School of Business & Management, http://sbm.temple.edu
Temple University, http://www.temple.edu
300 Speakman Hall
215-204-2727 office
215-204-5698 fax
DavidFeeney | 22 Apr 17:35 2002
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Web readability: Where's the plain english?

http://news.com.com/2008-1082-887841.html?legacy=cnet&tag=pt.msnbc.feed..ne_9742412
http://www.consumerprivacyguide.org/law/glb.shtml

Stop! Look before you click
By Rachel Konrad
Staff Writer, CNET News.com
April 22, 2002, 4:00 AM PT

Mark Hochhauser doesn't mince words.

That's because the frank-talking psychologist is also an expert in "readability," who practices what he preaches. The 55-year-old resident of Golden Valley, Minn., pores over contracts, disclosure statements and privacy notices to determine whether real people--not lawyers or business executives--understand them. Then he tells companies, research groups and government agencies how to translate legalese into plain English.

Hochhauser has spent the past several years studying the readability--or lack thereof--of online documents, particularly privacy agreements. Most of them require the user to click "I agree" before proceeding with their purchase or download. Hochhauser says people rarely understand what they're signing, mindlessly clicking contracts that could hijack their computers or make them targets of aggressive advertisers.

The "I agree" frenzy has reached new levels as the popularity of file-swapping software mushrooms. Earlier this month, millions of consumers downloaded the Kazaa file-swapping program, only to realize later that they had unwittingly agreed to install software that could help turn their computers into nodes for a peer-to-peer network controlled by a third company, Brilliant Digital Entertainment.

Hochhauser dissected Brilliant's 4,093-word privacy policy and terms of use statements, determining that the Internal Revenue Service's 1040 EZ form was simpler to read. He spoke to CNET News.com about why companies refuse to use plain English--and how consumers get lost in the translation.

Q: How would you describe most contracts software companies require users to sign?

A: It's legalese written by lawyers who want to protect the company, and they're using legal terms that the general public isn't familiar with.

You have to scroll down through it, which makes it impossible to read. You can rarely click a button to get a printout, and in some cases you can't even cut and paste it into a document you can print out and read later. CNET, newspapers and other publications have had the "click to print" button for years, but I don't think I've ever seen one in a terms of service contract.

One thing I've noticed is that these contracts are simply text--no interactive graphics or any other means of taking advantage of the Web as a medium of communication.

How does that contribute to the problem?

We've learned a lot about Web design. We know we should be using short paragraphs without too many pages because it's tough to keep people focused on text. But these consent forms are not developed with any sense of Web design or document design at all. These are the exact same forms that you could have gotten 10 years ago in a book. If you look at how visual the Web is, why do we have consent policies that are the equivalent of eight pages of text? It's no surprise that people ignore them.

Take off your readability hat and put on your psychology hat. What are people thinking when they click "I agree"? Are they illiterate? Naive? Stupid?

They're not stupid. They're trusting. It's actually quite similar behavior to sick people. Patients who are very sick can be given a 3,000-word consent form written by lawyers with the same level of complexity as these privacy notices...The sick people usually just sign it without reading it because their doctor said it was OK. Same thing here--the reader thinks, 'The FTC would close them down if they were doing something really bad.' There may be a basic element of trust that people bring into this.

Let me play devil's advocate. Don't people who click "I accept" forfeit their rights? What happened to caveat emptor?

To some extent, sure, the onus really is on the user to decide whether they want to read it. At the same time, there is some responsibility on the Web site to present the information in a form you can use without a dictionary, trying to figure out what every sentence really means. Sure, there's a responsibility on the reader, but there is such a thing as information overload.

It seems ad-supported software preys on people's urge to try to get something for nothing. Do these adware companies appeal to our lowest urges?

Yes. Anything that says "free," people want. But eventually people will realize there's not really such thing as "free" software. It comes with a price--in this case the annoyance of advertising, or possibly privacy violations.

Clearly software companies need legal protection. How can they write policies that are both intelligible to teenagers--yet cover their legal backs?

The real way to do this better is to have consumers involved in the writing and editing process. The companies need to sit down with a focus group of actual users and say, "Do you understand this? How could we make you understand this?" Real users, not lawyers, need to write the forms. Then they need to redesign the sites so that the consent forms are visual, not legalese text blocks.

Why can't companies write in plain English?

My guess is that writing in legalese gets them off the hook. The message is, "We asked you to scroll down, and you did, so we're not liable." They set it up so you had to scroll through it--even if you didn't read it.

I don't know how often these companies get sued over issues in their privacy policy. I know if you go to terms of service, it pretty much says, "You can't sue us for anything." That's pretty much what they say in 8,000 words.

There's been a plain English movement in the legal profession for 20 years, but it's not very widely used...

continued http://news.com.com/2008-1082-887841.html?legacy=cnet&tag=pt.msnbc.feed..ne_9742412

My best,

Dr. David Feeney
DavidFeeney <at> aol.com
Director of Digital Education, http://foxonline.temple.edu
FOX School of Business & Management, http://sbm.temple.edu
Temple University, http://www.temple.edu
300 Speakman Hall
215-204-2727 office
215-204-5698 fax
Michael Weinberg | 19 Apr 14:33 2002

BAO and Behavior Analsis as a "Cult"

With regard to the issue of Behavior Analysis becoming its own separate profession -
I can say that here in Florida that is not even a question but a reality. The fact is
that the profession of Applied Behavior Analysis has been separated from psychology
in state law by the state legislature some years ago due to the lobbying efforts of
FABA, which need to continue for ABA to enjoy such autonomy as a profession.  It has
resulted in independent training programs at universities and by private parties who
are CBAs to flourish. An excellent example is that since coming to Florida from
Pennsylvania, I have become a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, and now teach my own
class sponsored by my agency, and that is approved through our own behavior analyst
mechanisms (Mike Hemingway has such authority for state of Florida certification
programs in behavior analysis, and now the Board under Jerry Shook has such
authority).  Florida has a well-organized peer review process for the approval and
review of restrictive behavior programs, and state laws governing best practices in
the field of behavior analysis.  Only CBAs with extended priviliges or with board
certification have authority to author and monitor behavior plans that involve
restrictive interventions, and/or address particularly dangerous types of behavior
such as self-injury or aggression, and to vote on the peer review panels to approve
such plans for other agencies.  FABA hosts a well-organized and well-attended
conference on behavior analysis each year with presentations by leaders in the field
nationally attending and presenting (e.g. Jack Michael, Murray Sidman, the late Glen
Latham, and so on).

I think this is an attestation to the role behavior analysts can have in society.  It
could risk becoming cult-like, but we need to also monitor ourselves to prevent this
from happening. Behavior analysts are also diverse in their backgrounds as I believe
Joe is alluding to in his statements. This will allow for opportunities to learn from
one another through forums such as BAO.

Mike

> Subject: Re: VIP & BAO.ORG
> Date: Fri, 19 Apr 2002 00:37:37 -0400
> From: Joseph Cautilli <jcautill <at> ASTRO.OCIS.TEMPLE.EDU>
> Reply-To: "Behavior2000: Behavior and Digital Technology List"
>      <BEHAVIOR2000 <at> LISTSERV.TEMPLE.EDU>
> To: BEHAVIOR2000 <at> LISTSERV.TEMPLE.EDU 
>
> Bill Verplank asks two critical questions about BAO (1) Are we making
> Behavior analysis a cult? (2) Are we only talking to ourselves?
>
> The question of cult status is an important one. BAO is the publisher of
> the Behavior Analyst Today (BAT). BAT has always published thoughtful
> critiques of Behavior Analysis. For example Steven Hayes wrote an article
> some issue back warning behavior analyst's of the exact things that
> Verplank points out. In addition, the most recent issue of BAT publishes
> the strongest critique of behavior analyst of exaggerated claims for
> children with autism (check out hte article by James Herbert). Thus, I
> believe that we print both sides of the issues. We are committed to
> science, not and I repeat not religon. We will publish, even Bill critique
> if you can find the energy to write it up. ( I have been very concerned
> about you being on a venterator for the last year, so I mean energy
> sincerly- we may not always agree but my concern for you is real). Do I
> believe that Behavior analysis has reached hte point where it will become
> its own profession. To this I say yes. Will it replace all other
> professions, never nor would I want it too. BAO is just a recognition
> thatthe field of behavior analysis has moved into becoming an alternative
> to psychology for those seekign behavior change. Will we be superior,
> probably in many areas. Still in others we might not be and we should be
> humble about this and acknowledge this.
>
> Are we only speaking to ourselves? I teach in a teacher education masters
> program. I serve as an appleate due process officer in teh state of
> Pennsylvania. I am also Director of Clinical Team services in a local
> mental health clinic and run an extensive community based service program,
> many of the people who work in the program are not, nor probably will
> never be behaviorists. Thus, the vast majority of my day is spent talking
> to educators and clinicians not to convert them but to apply sklills to
> practical problmes which I help them solve. Is BAO only speaking to
> itself? BA is the offical website of the Behavior Analysis SIG at the
> Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy (a SIG I founded and
> continue to serve as president). AABT is a largely cogntive organization.
> Cogntivists have and will continue to write articles for BAT in areas
> where the editoral staff feels grounds for integration are possible. Check
> out the next four issues Spanning the next year and you will find that
> many of the front running clinicans in the field of anxiety disorders,
> post traumatic stress disorder, and depression will be writing articles
> for BAT. A second group that BAT serves are those in the Clnical Behavior
> Analysis SIG at ABA. This SIG is far from opposed to alternative
> traditions. We have published a series of articles from this group
> covering everything from pain to disociative identity disorder. we have
> another series of articles coming up from this group critiquing there own
> approach to therapy and looking at the growing pains for Clinical Behavior
> Analysis. Another area where BAT vertures to encourage discussion is in
> its soon to come Sunday lecture Series. The Sunday Lecture Series (SLS)
> will be provided by the Walker institute group and will provide ACT 48
> continuing education credits to teachers in Pennsylvania. SLS plans to
> provide 3 hour workshops every Sunday morning in the up coming year. These
> workshops will cover things like functional behavioral assessment, direct
> instruction, classroom mangament, curriculum based measurement, curriculum
> based assessment, etc.
>
> I offer the above as only a brief example of why I must respectfully
> reject your statements about BAO. I do understand your decision not to
> join Neitche and become a VIP to the BAO site.While your decision saddens
> me personally, I wish you the best ( I hope that we will be having this
> discussion ten years from now- at which time I will probably be saying
> "see I told you so!;-)"). Remember the invitation is always an open one.
>
> Joe
>
> P.S. As a side note, while not an easy decision for me, I support the
> Edison take over. Edison has supported Direct Instruction curriculums in
> the past. In addition, I support Temple's new role. While I am not at this
> point personally involved at this point, I believe that this will put alot
> of new ideas into the system and alot of old issues might be settled.
>
> P.P.S. BAO is all the behavior analysis, with none of the things that you
> hate like beggin' spam.
>
> On Thu, 18 Apr 2002, William S. Verplanck wrote:
>
> > (1)     Sorry, Joe, under no circumstances would I participate in this
> > program.  It's no more, and no less, one more step in the direction of the
> > development of behavior analysis, and especially 'applied' behavior
> > analysts, into a cult.
> >
> > To quote myself:
> >
> > "We're great at explaining ourselves to ourselves and at neglecting to note
> > that there are many others with whom we should converse, to whom we may
> > contribute, from whom we might learn, and with whom we may
> > accommodate.  Behavior analysis must _not_ become a cult."
> >
> > There is already far too much evidence that the process of cult-formation
> > is already too far advanced*
> >
> > Today's NYT reports that 42 (1 out of every 6) of Philadelphia's schools
> > (most failing victims of educationalism?) are being privatized, most of
> > them contracted out to the "Edison" people, five to Temple University,
> > three to the Univ. of Pa, and the remaining fourteen to four other bodies,
> > with a variety of methodologies.  Do any of these apply the methodologies
> > of applied behavior analysis?  Will the able behavior analysts (both exptal
> > and applied) at Temple participate?  If not, why not?  How many such
> > schools and charter schools have behavior analysts set up, worked in _or_ with?
> >
> > Are we talking only to ourselves, and not to parents, school boards, review
> > boards, and those politically responsible for education?
> >
> > Shouldn't behavior analysts be out there running schools and teaching, by
> > example?  (Whatever became of Don Cooke's very beh. an. endeavors?)
> >
> > (2)     I'd like to believe that I'm totally out of the loop, laboring
> > under a great misapprehension, and that the foregoing is altogether
> > wrong-headed.  Then, there's another reason I can't participate in
> > Nietsche.  I'm 86 and live on the end of a fifty or sixty foot oxygen
> > tube.  Emphysema precludes long-term commitments--of which I already have
> > too many!
> >
> > W.S.V.
> >
> > P.S.  I note that the record of Edison's schools is lousy.  Should behavior
> > analysts try to teach _them_ something?
> >
> > W.S.V.
> >
> >
> >
> > _____________________________________________
> >     William S. Verplanck          wverplan <at> utk.edu 
> >   An award-winning site: http://web.utk.edu/~wverplan/ 
> >     http://web.utk.edu/~wverplan/kantor/kantor.html 
> > _____________________________________________
> >

William S. Verplanck | 18 Apr 23:44 2002
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VIP & BAO.ORG

(1)     Sorry, Joe, under no circumstances would I participate in this
program.  It's no more, and no less, one more step in the direction of the
development of behavior analysis, and especially 'applied' behavior
analysts, into a cult.

To quote myself:

"We're great at explaining ourselves to ourselves and at neglecting to note
that there are many others with whom we should converse, to whom we may
contribute, from whom we might learn, and with whom we may
accommodate.  Behavior analysis must _not_ become a cult."

There is already far too much evidence that the process of cult-formation
is already too far advancedÂ…

Today's NYT reports that 42 (1 out of every 6) of Philadelphia's schools
(most failing victims of educationalism?) are being privatized, most of
them contracted out to the "Edison" people, five to Temple University,
three to the Univ. of Pa, and the remaining fourteen to four other bodies,
with a variety of methodologies.  Do any of these apply the methodologies
of applied behavior analysis?  Will the able behavior analysts (both exptal
and applied) at Temple participate?  If not, why not?  How many such
schools and charter schools have behavior analysts set up, worked in _or_ with?

Are we talking only to ourselves, and not to parents, school boards, review
boards, and those politically responsible for education?

Shouldn't behavior analysts be out there running schools and teaching, by
example?  (Whatever became of Don Cooke's very beh. an. endeavors?)

(2)     I'd like to believe that I'm totally out of the loop, laboring
under a great misapprehension, and that the foregoing is altogether
wrong-headed.  Then, there's another reason I can't participate in
Nietsche.  I'm 86 and live on the end of a fifty or sixty foot oxygen
tube.  Emphysema precludes long-term commitments--of which I already have
too many!

W.S.V.

P.S.  I note that the record of Edison's schools is lousy.  Should behavior
analysts try to teach _them_ something?

W.S.V.

_____________________________________________
    William S. Verplanck          wverplan <at> utk.edu
  An award-winning site: http://web.utk.edu/~wverplan/
    http://web.utk.edu/~wverplan/kantor/kantor.html
_____________________________________________

JWESHLEMAN | 18 Apr 22:40 2002
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Re: Programmed instruction (fwd)

In a message dated 04/18/2002 4:17:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
wverplan <at> UTKUX.UTCC.UTK.EDU forwards:

<< K. A. Stroud wrote these insightful words over 30 years ago.  Why
 are these behaviorally based methods of instruction not in greater
 use?  What is it going to take for these proven methods of instruction to
 be implemented on a large scale in educational establishments? >>

As before, Vargas & Vargas (1992) conducted a scholarly review of the
history of Programmed Instruction.  The same volume contains B.F.
Skinner's paper, "The Shame of American Education," and also
contains artices on Direct Instruction and on Precision Teaching,
among various education-related papers.  The whole volume is
a "must" for anyone interested in behavioral efforts in education.

Both the Vargas & Vargas article, and the Skinner article too,
for that matter, address those questions.

As a movement, Programmed Instruction collapsed.  Various
explanations, which are not mutually exclusive, have been
advanced to explain that collapse. In my summary of the Vargas
& Vargas article posted a few days ago, I covered the basic
points they made regarding that collapse.  Since then nothing
that gainsays their explanations has been presented.

 -- JE

REFERENCES:

Skinner, B.F. (1992). The shame of American education. In R.P.
West & L.A. Hamerlynck (eds.) Designs for Excellence in
Education: The Legacy of B.F. Skinner. Limited Edition. Longmont,
CO: Sopris West. pp. 15-30.  Also published in 1987 in Upon
Further Reflection.

Vargas, E.A., & Vargas, J.S. (1992). Programmed instruction and
teaching machines.  In R.P. West & L.A. Hamerlynck (eds.)
Designs for Excellence in Education: The Legacy of B.F. Skinner.
Limited Edition. Longmont, CO: Sopris West. pp. 33-69.

William S. Verplanck | 18 Apr 22:35 2002
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Tests/exams (m.c. tests)

When a student takes a multiple-choice exam and doesn't recognize the
'correct' answer, he or she guesses, with a 1/4 or 1/5 "chance."  What is
the probability that he or she will repeat that choice at a later
time?   That they will _learn_ the errors they have made?  That they will
now "know" a bit of 'disinformation?'

Data from research on this specific issue will very likely show that there
is a _very_ high probability that students acquire a bundle of
misinformation this way!

W.S.V.
_____________________________________________
    William S. Verplanck          wverplan <at> utk.edu
  An award-winning site: http://web.utk.edu/~wverplan/
    http://web.utk.edu/~wverplan/kantor/kantor.html
_____________________________________________

DavidFeeney | 18 Apr 19:00 2002
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NEA Rankings of the States 2002

http://www.nea.org/nr/nr020408.html
http://www.edexcellence.net/gadfly

Rankings of the States 2001 and Estimates of School Statistics 2002
National Education Association

The National Education Association’s research department has put out
this joint edition of two annual data sources, one ranking the states on
a wide variety of quantitative education indicators in 2001, the other
estimating some of the same statistics for states and the nation in
2002. There’s tons of data here, much of it fairly accessible and much
of it credible.

Readers may not realize, for example, that average
per-pupil public school spending has risen to an estimated $7425 in the
current school year (not counting capital costs, interest payments,
etc.)  But some of the NEA’s blind spots and policy agendas show up,
too. There is nary a mention of charter schools, for example, and
teacher pay figures do not include fringe benefits. If you’d like your
very own copy, visit http://www.nea.org/nr/nr020408.html
—Chester E. Finn, Jr.

forwarded by

Dr. David Feeney
DavidFeeney <at> aol.com
Director of Digital Education, http://foxonline.temple.edu
FOX School of Business & Management, http://sbm.temple.edu
Temple University, http://www.temple.edu
300 Speakman Hall
215-204-2727 office
215-204-5698 fax

Gmane