JacDon | 1 Jun 16:32 2011
Picon
Picon

New Issue

New issue of Activist Newsletter     #167

Articles include

OBAMA'S. FOREIGN POLICY OBJECTIVES in the Middle East, North Africa and
Central Asia. 

THE DEMOCRATS AND 'LESSER EVIL' POLITICS.
UNPRECEDENTED NAKBA ACTIONS
THE COUNTER-REVOLUTION CLUB
TEN REASONS TO AVOID GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS
WORLD FOOD FEARS RETURN
"AIPAC DOES NOT SPEAK FOR ME"

And more at http://activistnewsletter.blogspot.com/

------------------------------------

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Steve Cooke | 2 Jun 13:34 2011
Picon

www.cpgb.org.uk

Weekly Worker 868 - Thursday June 02 2011

The latest edition of the Weekly Worker is now available online at
http://www.cpgb.org.uk/edition.php?issue_id=868

TAHRIR SQUARE COMES TO MADRID
It is essential to critically engage with movements like Democracia
Real Ya, argues Maciej Zurowski

LETTERS
Traitors; Not rape; Enthusiasm; Unfair;
An ethical revolution of the mind
Esther of Democracia Real Ya spoke to the Weekly Worker

FAITH, FLAG, FAMILY, SOCIALISM?
'Blue Labour' is the latest fad to enrapture the leadership of the
Labour Party. James Turley probes into its appeal for 'Red' Ed

STRIKING TOGETHER
Ben Lewis looks forward to a bold show of mass opposition to austerity
on June 30

VICTORY CLAIMED AS GMB REJECTS WORKFARE
What was a union's logo doing on a report recommending the
privatisation of the employment and benefit service? Tony Greenstein
reports

THE STUDY OF HISTORY AND THE LEFT'S DECLINE
Dealing with the present demands not useful myths, writes Mike
Macnair, but a real understanding of the past
(Continue reading)

Arthur Maglin | 3 Jun 18:30 2011
Picon
Picon

Day of Action June 16 - Solidarity with Carlos Montes



Day of Action June 16 - Solidarity with Carlos Montes#outlook A { PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-TOP: 0px } BODY { WIDTH: 100% !important } .ReadMsgBody { WIDTH: 100% } .ExternalClass { WIDTH: 100% } BODY { -webkit-text-size-adjust: none } BODY { PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; MARGIN: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-TOP: 0px } IMG { LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; BORDER-RIGHT-WIDTH: 0px; OUTLINE-STYLE: none; BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 0px; HEIGHT: auto; BORDER-LEFT-WIDTH: 0px; TEXT-DECORATION: none } TABLE TD { BORDER-COLLAPSE: collapse } #backgroundTable { PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; MARGIN: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; WIDTH: 100% !important; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; HEIGHT: 100% !important; PADDING-TOP: 0px } BODY { BACKGROUND-COLOR: #fafafa } #backgroundTable { BACKGROUND-COLOR: #fafafa } #templateContainer { BORDER-BOTTOM: #dddddd 1px solid; BORDER-LEFT: #dddddd 1px solid; BORDER-TOP: #dddddd 1px solid; BORDER-RIGHT: #dddddd 1px solid } H1 { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; MARGIN: 0px 0px 10px; DISPLAY: block; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #202020; FONT-SIZE: 34px; FONT-WEIGHT: bold } .h1 { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; MARGIN: 0px 0px 10px; DISPLAY: block; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #202020; FONT-SIZE: 34px; FONT-WEIGHT: bold } H2 { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; MARGIN: 0px 0px 10px; DISPLAY: block; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #202020; FONT-SIZE: 30px; FONT-WEIGHT: bold } .h2 { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; MARGIN: 0px 0px 10px; DISPLAY: block; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #202020; FONT-SIZE: 30px; FONT-WEIGHT: bold } H3 { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; MARGIN: 0px 0px 10px; DISPLAY: block; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #202020; FONT-SIZE: 26px; FONT-WEIGHT: bold } .h3 { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; MARGIN: 0px 0px 10px; DISPLAY: block; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #202020; FONT-SIZE: 26px; FONT-WEIGHT: bold } H4 { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; MARGIN: 0px 0px 10px; DISPLAY: block; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #202020; FONT-SIZE: 22px; FONT-WEIGHT: bold } .h4 { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; MARGIN: 0px 0px 10px; DISPLAY: block; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #202020; FONT-SIZE: 22px; FONT-WEIGHT: bold } #templatePreheader { BACKGROUND-COLOR: #fafafa } .preheaderContent DIV { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #505050; FONT-SIZE: 10px } .preheaderContent DIV A:link { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } .preheaderContent DIV A:visited { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } .preheaderContent DIV A .yshortcuts { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } #templateHeader { BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff; BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 0px } .headerContent { TEXT-ALIGN: center; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; LINE-HEIGHT: 100%; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #202020; FONT-SIZE: 34px; VERTICAL-ALIGN: middle; FONT-WEIGHT: bold; PADDING-TOP: 0px } .headerContent A:link { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } .headerContent A:visited { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } .headerContent A .yshortcuts { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } #headerImage { MAX-WIDTH: 600px !important; HEIGHT: auto } #templateContainer { BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff } .bodyContent { BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff } .bodyContent DIV { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 150%; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #505050; FONT-SIZE: 14px } .bodyContent DIV A:link { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } .bodyContent DIV A:visited { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } .bodyContent DIV A .yshortcuts { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } .bodyContent IMG { DISPLAY: inline; HEIGHT: auto } #templateFooter { BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff; BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 0px } .footerContent DIV { TEXT-ALIGN: left; LINE-HEIGHT: 125%; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #707070; FONT-SIZE: 12px } .footerContent DIV A:link { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } .footerContent DIV A:visited { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } .footerContent DIV A .yshortcuts { COLOR: #336699; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: underline } .footerContent IMG { DISPLAY: inline } #social { BORDER-RIGHT-WIDTH: 0px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #fafafa; BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-LEFT-WIDTH: 0px } #social DIV { TEXT-ALIGN: center } #utility { BORDER-RIGHT-WIDTH: 0px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff; BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-LEFT-WIDTH: 0px } #utility DIV { TEXT-ALIGN: center } #monkeyRewards IMG { MAX-WIDTH: 190px } BODY { BACKGROUND-COLOR: #d3d3d3 } #backgroundTable { BACKGROUND-COLOR: #d3d3d3 }
 

June 16 - Day of Solidarity Actions for Carlos Montes
Is this email not displaying correctly?
View it in your browser.

Take Action in Solidarity with Carlos Montes,
Veteran Chicano Activist and
Immigrants’ Rights Leader

Join the National Day of Action
Thursday, June 16, 2011


We are calling for protests on the day that Carlos Montes appears in court in the aftermath of the FBI and Los Angeles Sheriff’s raid on his home. Please organize an action in your city - then email the info to us (info <at> stopfbi.net) and we will post it to the StopFBI.net website.

In an expansion and intensification of FBI repression of political activists, a SWAT Team along with the FBI smashed down the door and rushed in with automatic weapons as Carlos Montes’ slept in his home on May 17, 2011 at 5:00 AM. Carlos is a longtime Chicano activist and active member of the Committee to Stop FBI Repression. The raiders ransacked his house, taking his computer, cell phones and hundreds of documents, photos, diskettes and mementos of his current political activities in the pro-immigrant rights and Chicano civil rights movement. Hundreds of historical documents related to the Chicano movement were taken away. He was arrested on one charge dealing with a firearm code and released on bail the following morning.

This attack on Carlos Montes is part of the campaign of FBI harassment targeting 23 peace and justice activists which has until now been centered in the Midwest. Carlos Montes’ name was listed on the search warrant left in the office of the Minneapolis Anti-War Committee last September 24. An FBI agent approached Carlos while he was in a squad car and asked him questions about the Freedom Road Socialist Organization.

Carlos Montes has done nothing wrong. This is an attack on him and an attack on the Chicano movement for equality. Carlos has been involved and a committed leader in the immigrant rights, anti war, solidarity, and quality education movements his whole life. Please stand with Carlos and defend all the movements for equality and justice.

On June 16, Carlos Montes will appear in court. We need your support. Join in protest with thousands across the country and demand:
  • Drop the Charges Against Carlos Montes!

  • Stop FBI Attacks on the Chicano and Immigrant Rights Movements!

  • Stop FBI Repression of Anti-War and International Solidarity Activists NOW!


Take Action!  Please organize a local protest or picket in your city on Thursday, June 16.

E-mail us at info <at> stopfbi.net to let us know what you have planned.
Check out www.StopFBI.net to see if there is an action in your area.
If you have not already done so, please sign the Carlos Montes petition.

In solidarity,
The Committee to Stop FBI Repression

Copyright © 2011 Committee to Stop FBI Repression, All rights reserved.
Thanks for your ongoing interest in the fight against FBI repression of anti-war and international solidarity activists!
Our mailing address is:
Committee to Stop FBI Repression
PO Box 14183
Minneapolis, MN 55414

Add us to your address book



__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Hunter Gray | 3 Jun 18:58 2011

The Brazilian tribe that played by our rules, and lost

The Brazilian tribe that played by our rules, and lost

The Kayapó people's battle to save their land from flooding as the Bel Monte dam is built follows a pattern across the Americas.

Chief Raoni smokes a pipe while demonstrating against the construction of the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam. Photograph: Reuters/Ueslei Marcelino

The man pictured above is Raoni Txucarramãe, chief of the Kayapó people, who hail from Brazil's northern Pará province. The homeland of the Kayapó is the tropical rainforest surrounding the tributaries of the giant Xingu river, itself a nearly 2,000km long tributary of the Amazon. But the livelihood of the Kayapó people is under grave threat. Brazil's president, Dilma Vana Rousseff, has authorised the construction of a dam that will flood their homeland.

The Belo Monte dam will be the world's third-largest hydroelectric dam (after China's Three Gorges dam, itself with numerous problems, and the Brazilian-Paraguayan Itaipu dam). It will flood 400,000 hectares of the world's largest rainforest, displacing 20,000 to 40,000 people – including the Kayapó. The ecological impact of the project is massive: the Xingu River basin has four times more biodiversity than all of Europe. Flooding of the rainforest will liberate massive amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas far more damaging than carbon dioxide. But the impact on Chief Raoni's people, on an entire society, is unimaginable.

The Kayapó traditionally practised slash-and-burn agriculture on small farms cut into the jungle. The rich resources of their lands (minerals, timber, and potential hydroelectrical power) have brought pressures from outside. Although the Brazilian constitution explicitly prohibits the displacement of "Indians" from their traditional lands, it provides for one convenient exception: where the National Congress deems removal of the people to be "in the interest of the sovereignty of the country". Proponents of the dam argue that its construction is in the nation's interest.

The Kayapó people's leadership has learned how to participate in the world economy. They were one of the first indigenous peoples to participate in international commerce, with the Body Shop, and they learned how to fight back against projects they did not support. A five-day media conference they organised to fight the Bel Monte dam in 1989 generated enough international attention that the World Bank refused the loan necessary for the project to proceed.

Now, as the project raises its head again, the Kayapó have forged alliances with non-profits worldwide to continue their battle. In February, Chief Raoni delivered a petition with 600,000 signatures to the Brazilian government, and construction of the dam was temporarily blocked. But this week, the Brazilian government gave the project the green light.

Chief Raoni and his people have, essentially, played by our rules. They learned the ways of a foreign society, and they waged their battle according to those foreign rules and with those foreign weapons, launching petitions and protests, and engaging media and lawyers. I am reminded of another photo that recently appeared on these pages: that of an "uncontacted" Amazonian tribe, their bows raised, their arrows aimed at the Brazilian Indian Affairs Department aircraft flying overhead. For all his efforts, Chief Raoni, too, might as well have been shooting arrows at the Brazilian National Congress building.

This losing battle is not unique. Rather, it is the common story to the Americas. I recall my visits with Cristina Calderón, known in Chile as "the last Yaghan", the last survivor of her race and last speaker of her native tongue. Across the Beagle Channel from her home lies the large island of Tierra del Fuego, traditional homeland of the Selk'nam, but now devoid of any indigenous people. The demise of the Yaghan was due largely to diseases introduced and spread by displacement from their expansive territories to crowded mission schools. The Selk'nam, however, were actively hunted by European settlers. The new industry here was sheep-ranching. With their traditional hunting territories turned to grazing lands, and with no concept of animals as private property, the Selk'nam turned to hunting sheep. The settlers, in turn, issued a bounty for each pair of Selk'nam ears.

The Kayapó and their partners have launched a last-ditch effort, including another petition, to have the Brazilian government listen to their concerns, and respect traditional land rights. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has urged the Brazilian government to consult "in good faith … and with the aim of arriving at an agreement with each of the affected indigenous communities".

But I know, from experience here, where I live – also a land of pristine rainforest that is still populated by vibrant communities of original inhabitants – what industry's requirement to "consult" with indigenous people means: the parties will, at some point, show up in a room together and voice their opinions. The indigenous people will have every right to say no to the project. But no one is required to heed that.



__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Arthur Maglin | 3 Jun 19:28 2011
Picon
Picon

Worker-communist Party of Iran: Osanloo free at last

 

The Worker-communist Party of Iran carries a press release about the release of International Transport Workers' Federation trade unionist, Mansour Osanloo, being released from jail after four years imprisonment. His case was the subject of international protest.
http://worker-communistpartyofiran.blogspot.com/2011/06/osanloo-free-at-last.html

__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Hunter Gray | 4 Jun 17:27 2011

Forest Fires: Causes, Prevention, Fire Lookouts, Fighting Strategies -- and more

June 4, 2011 / Note by Hunter Bear:

Forest fire season is now underway yet again.

Whatever the realities of global warming -- and I think there's something to it all -- forest fires are almost always caused by human beings or lightning.  Extreme drought, maybe exacerbated by global warming, can certainly feed into forest fire situations.  But there have always been droughts, many profound and of lengthy duration -- and long, long before global warming.  Scientific tree ring dating analysis --  Dendrochronology -- sometimes on very elderly trees [e.g. several centuries old Alligator Junipers] and even on timber posts retrieved archaeologically from many centuries old "Indian dwelling ruins", certainly indicate that.

So, again, we are down to people and lightning.  Here is our long and full webpage on the forest fire situation.  It is based primarily on my own quite considerable personal experience as a fire-fighter and fire lookout.  A recent addition to this page is "The Life of a Fire Lookout."

 

UPDATE NOTE BY HUNTER BEAR: [NOVEMBER 3 2007]

Given the sad events of this fall and our preceding summer, there is a good deal of broad interest in Western forest/brush fire situations. While a few may have seen our large webpage on the general situation, most probably have not. That Link follows. I personally tend to write primarily -- whatever the topic -- from direct personal experience and observation. Much of my life has been spent in Western mountain country and I do know a good deal first-hand about fighting forest fires. While I don't know much at all about the western California situations, I am aware that extremely rapid expansion of the human population into heavily timbered and/or brushy regions -- almost in a crazy-quilt quasi-checkerboard fashion -- is a part of the problem faced there. But there are others, perhaps more unique to that specific region than, say, Northern Arizona or Idaho or Montana or New Mexico. Some years ago, one of my oldest friends -- and, in the old days, a long-time colleague in direct forest fire fighting -- was sent from Northern Arizona into a California situation. He has described it to me many times as the most chaotic experience he ever had fighting fire -- extremely poor and confused inter-agency coordination and a frequent lack of "outdoors" experience by many of the ostensible fire fighters who often came from purely urban backgrounds. [Of course, a few of these recent California situations have, as they've gone along, become "urban fires" as well.] In the mess of some years ago described by my friend -- yet again as recently as a phone conversation a few weeks ago -- that crisis was solved only when another old friend of both of us from Northern Arizona -- a highly experienced fire dispatcher, fire boss, and fire fighter generally was rushed into that California mess as the top operational commander. In fast due course, that took care of things.

Anyway, here is our website page.  It is big, very full:  http://hunterbear.org/forest_fires_in_the_west.htm

 

HUNTER GRAY [HUNTER BEAR/JOHN R SALTER JR] Mi'kmaq /St. Francis
Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'
 
I have always lived and worked in the Borderlands.
Our Hunterbear website is now eleven years old..
Check out http://hunterbear.org/directory.htm
 
See - Personal and Detailed Background Narrative:
http://hunterbear.org/narrative.htm
 
See Outlaw Trail: The Native as Organizer:
http://hunterbear.org/outlaw_trail1.htm
[Included in Visions & Voices: Native American Activism [2009]
 
See our substantial Community Organizing course
(with new material into 2011):
http://hunterbear.org/my_combined_community_organizing.htm


__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Arthur Maglin | 5 Jun 07:40 2011
Picon
Picon

Psychology: Communist line struggle over alcoholism

 
Mike Ely has openned a really valuable discussion on the question of alcoholism within the communist movement. He himself extends an invitation to comments from the anarchist movement where he has some knowledge of similar struggles over the issue..
 
I would suggest that the whole Left should monitor this discussion and contribute to it. The quickly growing list  of responders following Mike's article shows the need for this discussion. A number of comments appropriately broaden the discussion to include drug addiction as well.
 
Drug use and addiction, of course, present special problems for Left organizations because of their illegality, but it is impossible for us to deny the pervasiveness of these problems in our society and their undoubted impact on our organizations.
http://kasamaproject.org/2011/06/03/psychology-opposing-communist-approaches-to-alcoholism/

__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Left News | 5 Jun 16:38 2011
Picon

A Banker’s Depression – June 3, 2011

In This Week’s WebZine

RESET YOUR LINKS

we have a new url:

http://www.socialistzine.org

A Banker’s Depression – June 3, 2011

Banks Again Depress US Economy
New York City Politics Beyond “The Rapture”
Guaranteed Employment in Charlottesville!
Say it ain't so, Trader Joe's!
We want Justice and Peace! Spain, Africa, the Middle East!
Right-Wing Campaign Against Democracy in Latin America
After the Canadian Election 2011
Remembering Gil Scott-Heron

RESET YOUR LINKS:

http://www.socialistzine.org

send submissions – socialistzine <at> gmail.com

Buy a subscription to The Socialist for only $10 a year!

http://socialistparty-usa.org/socialist/

------------------------------------

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Hunter Gray | 6 Jun 14:33 2011

Alpine, Arizona

There's a hell of a big forest fire in northeastern Arizona.  It's in turf I know well -- and it's burned at least a quarter of a million acres.  While some of that is brush, much is yellow pine, some is spruce and fir.  Those trees take ages to grow in the dry Southwest.  Reber commented on Redbadbear a couple of days ago that smoke was enveloping Albuquerque, far to the east; and that the fire wasn't getting much media coverage nationally.  It wasn't, but it's getting  somewhat more now since homes are burning and hundreds of refugees have fled to Springerville, a town to the west of the fire -- as the fire stands now, anyway.
 
Most people on the East and West coasts don't follow the forest fire situations in the West -- unless they happen to be occurring in southern California.  It's been my observation that that includes many radicals whose environmental interests can often -- often -- be thin, if existent at all.  Unless one can tie something to the lumber companies, there really isn't a class struggle in a forest fire.  And, as I've mentioned occasionally, while global warming might, I imagine, exacerbate the fire situation peripherally, it doesn't start fires.  People and lightning start those.  And known prolonged droughts have occurred in the Southwest for many centuries.
 
This fire, in its initial stages, was on the edges of what used to be the very small town of Alpine -- high up in elevation with some spruce and fir, very close to the New Mexico border [and its Catron County.]  In the old days, there were a few ranchers around Alpine and the USFS Alpine Ranger District has always been based there, first as part of the Apache National Forest [in my day] and now, via merger, the Apache/Sitgreaves National Forest. Now, there are a great many people living around there -- affluent people who've moved up into the cool climes from Phoenix or from California or various Eastern parts.  It's safe to assume that many of these have no deep feel for "the woods" and fire safety. 
 
The Alpine Ranger District was one of the last districts in the USFS' Region 3 to fall into bureaucratic ways.  I started my forest fire control career in my mid-teens, far below the legal age of 18.  During those years, I was involved in the Coconino National Forest, based at Flagstaff.  Things were pretty non-bureaucratic and hang-loose -- and very effective with respect to fire-fighting but, even then, there were signs of "tightening things up."  When I returned from the Army, I found that several old and good friends of mine -- including a district ranger -- were gone from the Coconino.  The ranger had been transferred to Region 3's "Siberia", the Alpine District of the Apache, largely because of his opposition to the voracious lumber companies based at Flagstaff.  Friends of his, and of mine, went with him.  When  I visited them in '55, everything was hang-loose at Alpine and very effective on all fronts.  It remained that way for awhile.  In 1959, it took me only one minute to secure a good summer USFS job out of Alpine for a 17 year old student of mine from Nebraska, a sharp guy from a very tough and low-income family situation and for whom I'd secured a good college scholarship in an eastern state.  A year after that, I put in my pleasantly very isolated full summer stint on high up Bear Mountain -- the most isolated fire lookout in Arizona -- relating by radio directly to Alpine. [This current fire horror has NOT gotten into the Bear Mountain setting.]  But only a few years after that. bureaucratization reached into the Alpine District situation.  My ranger friend survived but, in time, passed away.  Another good friend, early on, transferred to the U.S. Park Service and finished his government career in that context.
 
Yes, the weather has been fluky -- downright weird and very dangerous.  And there are vastly larger numbers of "outside" people in that close-to-my-heart setting than there were when I was a relative kid.  And the Forest Service, wedded to chain-of-command rigidities and often saddled with just-out of forestry school "shave tail" assistant rangers, often lacks the knowledge and ability to make quick and eclectic -- and effective -- strategic moves that involve not just airborne tech, but tough and savvy ground crews in substantive numbers.
 
Now, of course, I'm in Idaho, and not in the Alpine, Arizona region. And my thoughts are admittedly speculative. But I do know something about all of this.  http://hunterbear.org/forest_fires_in_the_west.htm
 
And my thoughts are very sad.
 
Hunter [Hunter Bear]
 
HUNTER GRAY [HUNTER BEAR/JOHN R SALTER JR] Mi'kmaq /St. Francis
Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'
 
I have always lived and worked in the Borderlands.
Our Hunterbear website is now eleven years old..
Check out http://hunterbear.org/directory.htm
 
See - Personal and Detailed Background Narrative:
http://hunterbear.org/narrative.htm
 
See Outlaw Trail: The Native as Organizer:
http://hunterbear.org/outlaw_trail1.htm
[Included in Visions & Voices: Native American Activism [2009]
 
See our substantial Community Organizing course
(with new material into 2011):
http://hunterbear.org/my_combined_community_organizing.htm


__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Arthur Maglin | 7 Jun 05:35 2011
Picon
Picon

Victor Serge Turns to Fiction

 

This article relates Victor Serge's fiction to his politics. It is written by a clear admirer of his work.
http://www.bookslut.com/features/2011_06_017749.php

__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31


Gmane