Hunter Gray | 1 May 15:06 2011

"Reds," John Reed, School Days

From an RBB discussion:
 
Reds is a favorite of mine and I'm always glad to see it return on HBO.  I do have it on VCR.  While it has a few "writer's license" facets, it's basically pretty accurate and the nature of John Reed is well depicted.  Louis [Fraina], if I recall correctly, eventually became Louis Corey, a sort of liberal economist.
 
Early on when I was 16 or so, my thinking horizons were beginning to widen considerably, Via a history prof friend of our family, I read the Communist Manifesto and found its historical/sociological frame useful -- and inspiring.  At that point, though, it didn't make me into a socialist, but it did considerably further my thinking. Mother told me about John Reed so I went to the library at then very small Arizona State, (Flagstaff -- the school is now Northern Arizona University), and checked out Granville Hicks' John Reed: Rebel into Revolutionary [1936]. Since my father taught there, I had library privileges.  [Another radical writer, John Stuart, I think, helped on the book but it's mostly all Hicks who was a fine writer.] Hicks later left the CP, around 1939 or so, and became sort of a right wing liberal -- but the book remains as a very fine work.
 
The old librarian was a white lady, Althea Ragsdale, well along in her years.  She was from Mississippi -- didn't like our family -- and gave me a very suspicious look when she processed the book, which hadn't been checked out since 1937.  She was involved in an affair with a retired Colonel, name of Drake, who was head resident at a dorm.  Although I lived at home and was quite technically underage at that point, I went to a party at "his" dorm and became -- along with everyone else -- intoxicated.  Drake called the cops but I was the only one he had arrested.  That was my first [and overnight] jail experience, cost $35.00.  My parents weren't especially disturbed at me.
 
A kid named Guthrie, also a student, decided to blow up the under construction, new college student union building in the middle of the night.  But he didn't know how to do dynamite and all that happened was that dozen of windows, mostly in the surrounding dorm buildings, were shattered by the blast.  He was fined $35.00 and his parents paid for the window replacements.  He was also suspended for a semester but in due course returned and graduated.  In this day and age, he'd probably be in a Guantanamo cell forever.
 
Few, if any, students or faculty liked Colonel Drake.  Not long after my arrest, the Colonel, who had a very expensive vehicle, sort of large Jeep genre, set out for far away Phoenix.  He had almost gotten up to the copper mining town of Jerome when his engine went out totally.  Someone had slightly loosened the "nut" in the vehicle's oil pan so the oil dripped out slowly but steadily.  If the good and forever unknown "perpetrator" had been caught, the fine probably would've been $35.00.
 
Anyway, I've always liked Reds -- and I have Hicks' fine work right here.
 
Hunter Bear
 
 
HUNTER GRAY [HUNTER BEAR/JOHN R SALTER JR] Mi'kmaq /St. Francis
Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'
 
I have always lived and worked in the Borderlands.
Our Hunterbear website is now eleven years old..
Check out http://hunterbear.org/directory.htm
 
See - Personal and Detailed Background Narrative:
http://hunterbear.org/narrative.htm
 
See - The Stormy Adoption of an Indian Child (My Father):
http://hunterbear.org/James%20and%20Salter%20and%20Dad.htm
 
And see - Elder Recognition Award
(Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Story Tellers:
http://hunterbear.org/elder_recognition_award_for_2005.htm
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: CornetJ
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 1:19 PM
Subject: [Redbadbear] Re: Early morning thoughts on things

 

I add numerous amens to Hunter's post.
The notion that the revolution will be performed by immigrants whose language we must speak reminds me of the scene in Reds where Louis insists on a politics based on the Russian Language Federation and Reed objects, wishing to appeal to Americans.
I am unfazed by the threat that, unless we renounce native traditions and embrace the culture of the latest immigrants, said immigrants will not agree to be "radical."
Eugene Victor Debs was as typical of the immigration as one could get: his parents named him after Eugene Sue and Victor Hugo, and he spoke our language.

- CJ

--- In Redbadbear <at> yahoogroups.com, "Hunter Gray" <hunterbadbear <at> ...> wrote:
>
> The discussion on Labor has become somewhat redundant -- and, to be frank about it, a little personal in some of its implications. I do want to comment on a few aspects and, as Mississippi Governor Barnett once said to the Kennedys in an entirely different context of stonewalling recalcitrance, "I do so politely."
>
> I don't think this country has changed substantially in the economic -- economic -- sense in these more contemporary times. The "power arrangements" do remain the same -- class struggle and all. C. Wright Mills' Power Elite could well be accurately written right at this present moment. True, there is large scale immigration from "south of the border" but there were the Irish in the earlier part of the 19th century, Scandinavians and Germans in the middle and latter parts of the 19th, truly massive immigration from southern and eastern Europe from 1890 or so to 1920. The AFL had some unions [not the "pure crafts"] which were open to the needs of the new immigrants. The IWW, a purely American product, was very much open to the immigrants -- and to all other workers. The great IWW strikes at Lawrence and Paterson are classic examples. The CIO continued that tradition. The rich cultural strains brought by the newcomers have always found a place in the American mosaic, including almost all unions.
>
> But, in the end, the social movements of this country have been grounded, and appropriately so, in broad American culture. None of this precludes recognition and use of any useful insights from other places. But, just as Geronimo took the 1876 Winchester into his Apache cultural context and used that for Apache purposes, so is the case on a much larger and broader scale in this country as a whole. None of this implies preaching "Americanism" in any nationalistic sense.
>
> The IWW was a very homegrown American entity which grew directly out of what were then, and remained for decades, the most bitterly fought class wars in the world: the mining wars on the Western American frontier. [Wobblies, BTW, never used terms like "syndicalism" and "anarcho-syndicalism" -- but spoke instead of Industrial Democracy." The IWW concept of the general strike grew out of the very logical real world observation that that tactic provided greater worker power that enhanced victory, The WFM was practicing that in its Western labor wars and the IWW staged an interesting general strike at Goldfield, Nevada, soon after its founding in 1905. Read as a starter, Bill Haywood's Book: The Autobiography of William D. Haywood, 1929 and subsequent editions.
>
> In my review more than a decade ago of Tony Lucas' Big Trouble, I wrote:
>
> As the Industrial Revolution filtered into the west following the Civil War and traveled the earlier trails of fur hunters, cattlemen, sheepmen, farmers and prospectors and self-employed miners, it saw these latter two replaced by rapidly growing mining companies. The companies were often based outside the West. Social class divisions were quickly driven canyon-deep. Wages and safety conditions plummeted and hours lengthened. This prompted miners and related workers to organize in individual local unions. Then, after a prolonged and thoroughly embittered strike in Idaho's Coeur d' Alene district in 1892, in which federal troops held hundreds of strikers in bullpen concentration camps, hard-rock miners formed the Western Federation of Miners [W.F.M.]
> Spreading across the mountain west, with the Butte local as its centerpiece, the W.F.M. met the force and ruthlessness of mine owners and managers with a militancy and recklessness of its own .". . .The extremes of violence in these labor struggles," wrote historians Selig Perlman and Philip Taft in the 1930s, "proceeded from no theory of revolution but from the general characteristics of the frontier."
>
> Any presumption that American workers -- or workers anywhere -- are unable to, with their own fine minds and logical processes, develop worthwhile "things" on their own, strikes me as a very odd notion. And if similar forms developed in other parts of the world, well -- there is the not uncommon phenomenon of "parallel cultural development".
>
> Yesterday I wrote, as I've said a number of times -- and so have countless others as well -- that: " What I'm simply saying is that Movements -- direct action and political -- have to be well grounded in their respective cultures. I don't think the workingclass in this country has ever gravitated to excessive theory and European jargon. The IWW and the Socialist Party are proof of that -- and the CP was smart enough to Americanize as fast as it could."
>
> I stand by that.
>
> Two or three people on our lists commented very favorably on a speech given by David McReynolds a few days ago and indicated one or the other of them would post it. I looked it up on his Edge Left site this morning. He said this,
>
> And in this task of building a movement for change, let us build on based on the uniqueness of
>
> this country, and not on patterns others have set. The lessons of the Russian Revolution do not
>
> prove a guide for us. Gandhi s tactics in India are not a guide to us. Remember that American
>
> socialism was a real force before the Russian Revolution and that the greatest example of
>
> nonviolence in this nation did not come from the white pacifists, but from the Black Churches in
>
> the South.
>
> Eugene V. Debs is an example of someone who tried to shape a movement based on the
>
> exceptionalism of this country, as A.J. Muste also did. Remember, each country is unique and
>
> exceptional."
>
>
>
> In a postscript, he added this -- which seems very reasonable, I think, to all of us:
>
>
>
> "I do not think socialism must be Marxist ?. There is religious socialism, utopian socialism,
>
> libertarian socialism. I simply want to affirm the debt we owe to Marx and Engels. I do not
>
> believe Marxism ? to be scientific socialism ?. It is said that at one point an exasperated Marx
>
> said thank God I am not a Marxist ?."
>
> HUNTER GRAY [HUNTER BEAR/JOHN R SALTER JR] Mi'kmaq /St. Francis
> Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
> Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
> and Ohkwari'
>
> I have always lived and worked in the Borderlands.
> Our Hunterbear website is now eleven years old..
> Check out http://hunterbear.org/directory.htm
>
> See - Personal and Detailed Background Narrative:
> http://hunterbear.org/narrative.htm
>
> See - The Stormy Adoption of an Indian Child (My Father):
> http://hunterbear.org/James%20and%20Salter%20and%20Dad.htm
>
> And see - Elder Recognition Award
> (Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Story Tellers:
> http://hunterbear.org/elder_recognition_award_for_2005.htm
>



__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Arthur Maglin | 1 May 20:32 2011
Picon
Picon

Capitalism And Class Struggle – Analysis « « Eurasia Review Eurasia Review

 
http://www.eurasiareview.com/capitalism-and-class-struggle-analysis-30042011/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+eurasiareview%2FVsnE+%28Eurasia+Review%29

__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Picon

Mother's Day VISA Campaign Letter Writing

 

Support the Cuban 5!!

THIS MOTHER'S DAY, SUPPORT THE WIVES OF GERARDO HERNANDEZ AND RENE GONZALEZ!

 

Due to the U.S. government’s denial to approve visas, Gerardo Hernandez Nordelo and Rene Gonzalez Sehwerert have not seen their wives since their incarceration!! Others in the Cuban 5 have not seen their parents, wives and children with regularity. The U.S. government has taken prolonged periods of time to issue them visas.

 

The U.S. government’s denial of visitation rights is a cruel and horrible form of psychological torture. Their rationale for denial is ridiculous and baseless; none of these family members are a threat to national security.

 

We are asking people to fax or mail out this letter to Ms. Navanetham Pillay, The NEW High Commissioner of Human Rights of the Office for Human Rights-United Nations Office at Geneva. We are asking her to intercede on behalf of the Cuban 5’s mothers/wives to pressure the U.S. government to grant them VISAs to visit their husbands/sons!!

 

 

Letter for the Visa Campaign!

 

The Popular Education Project toFree the Cuban 5

www.freethecuban5.com

 



__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Arthur Maglin | 4 May 07:00 2011
Picon
Picon

WESTERN SAHARA: The Polisario Front: what future?

 
http://www.internationalviewpoint.org/spip.php?article2130

__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Guillermon | 7 May 09:14 2011
Picon

THE ASSASSINATION OF OSAMA BIN LADEN

Reflections by Comrade Fidel

Those persons who deal with these issues know that on September 11 of 2001 our people expressed its
solidarity to the US people and offered the modest cooperation that in the area of health we could have
offered to the victims of the brutal attack against the Twin Towers in New York.
We also immediately opened our country's airports to the American airplanes that were unable to land
anywhere, given the chaos that came about soon after the strike.
The traditional stand adopted by the Cuban Revolution, which was always opposed to any action that could
jeopardize the life of civilians, is well known.
Although we resolutely supported the armed struggle against Batista's tyranny, we were, on principle,
opposed to any terrorist action that could cause the death of innocent people.  Such behavior, which has
been maintained for more than half a century, gives us the right to express our views about such a sensitive matter.
On that day, at a public gathering that took place at Ciudad Deportiva, I expressed my conviction that
international terrorism could never be erradicated through violence and war.
By the way, Bin Laden was, for many years, a friend of the US, a country that gave him military training; he was
also an adversary of the USSR and Socialism.  But, whatever the actions attributed to him, the
assassination of an unarmed human being while surrounded by his own relatives is something abhorrent.
Apparently this is what the government of the most powerful nation that has ever existed did.
In the carefully drafted speech announcing Bin Laden's death Obama asserts as follows:
"…And yet we know that the worst images are those that were unseen to the world. The empty seat at the dinner
table. Children who were forced to grow up without their mother or their father. Parents who would never
know the feeling of their child's embrace. Nearly 3,000 citizens taken from us, leaving a gaping hole in
our hearts."
That paragraph expressed a dramatic truth, but can not prevent honest persons from remembering the unjust
wars unleashed by the United States in Iraq and Afghanistan, the hundreds of thousands of children who
were forced to grow up without their mothers and fathers and the parents who would never know the feeling of
their child's embrace.
Millions of citizens were taken from their villages in Iraq, Afghanistan, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Cuba
and many other countries of the world.
Still engraved in the minds of hundreds of millions of persons are also the horrible images of human beings
who, in Guantánamo, a Cuban occupied  territory, walk down in silence, being submitted for months, and
even for years, to unbearable and excruciating tortures.  Those are persons who were kidnapped and
transferred to secret prisons with the hypocritical connivance of supposedly civilized societies.
Obama has no way to conceal that Osama was executed in front of his children and wives, who are now under the
custody of the authorities of Pakistan, a Muslim country of almost 200 million inhabitants, whose laws
have been violated, its national dignity offended and its religious traditions desecrated.
How could he now prevent the women and children of the person who was executed out of the law and without any
trial from explaining what happened? How could he prevent those images from being broadcast to the world?
On January 28 of 2002 the CBS journalist Dan Rather reported through that TV network that on September 10 of
2001, one day before the attacks against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Osama Bin Laden
underwent a hemodialysis at a military hospital in Pakistan.  He was physically unfit to hide and take
shelter inside deep caves.
Having assassinated him and plunging his corpse into the bottom of the sea are an expression of fear and
insecurity which turn him into a far more dangerous person.
The US public opinion itself, after the initial euphoria, will end up by criticizing the methods that, far
from protecting its citizen, will multiply the feelings of hatred and revenge against them.

Fidel Castro Ruz
May 4, 2011
8:34 p.m.

------------------------------------

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Hunter Gray | 7 May 16:02 2011

Grounds -- sometimes -- for suspicion

NOTE BY HUNTER BEAR  -  MAY 7 2011
 
There has been some discussion on RBB about Twin Towers, "Truthers", and the considerable suspicion often displayed in this country with regard to the Federal government.  This has touched matters and issues that have always been of considerable personal interest and concern to me.  Here are three posts of mine.  [H]
 
While I've given my own opinion on the Towers Tragedy -- I think it was an attack from the outside -- the whole issue does bespeak of a great deal of suspicion about our government.  And that's commonly found.  I have several thousand FOIA/PA recovered pages from FBI [1957-1979] and God alone knows how many since then are stashed away in that agency's millions of files. Most have seen this re myself
 but, if you haven't    http://www.newstrench.com/03secret/S.html
 
Lots and lots of people, often genuinely marginal in the economic sense, have had weird hassles with IRS. [We haven't -- have always been able to faithfully pay our Federal and state taxes, but many have not been so fortunate.] The Randy Weaver situation in North Idaho in 1992 [Bush 1] was a notorious abuse by ATF and FBI.   Waco, 1993 [Clinton] was a massive tragedy which, with some finesse, could have been avoided.  Gerry Spence of Wyoming secured some justice for Weaver who lost his wife and child; there was little for the Waco people, most of whom were dead. [ACLU avoided any involvement in the Weaver situation -- and had only a little via its Southern region on Waco, but not very much beyond some verbiage.] There have been many of the foregoing -- and more in other genre. 
 
Presidents now routinely go to war without following prescribed Constitutional processes -- and they and their circle, however skillfully and disingenuously, lie.  [When Ron Paul and Dennis Kucinich challenge all of that, they're sometimes called "wackos."]
 
Obviously, those are just a few of the many events in contemporary times that illustrate the reasons why a great many Americans are very wary, sometimes paranoid, about the government.  Most on this List alone could add a raft of other examples.
 
I have no use whatsoever for those who go after, harass, and sometimes try to shoot, USFS, BLM, Park Service or any other Federal employees in the name of "free America."  But their genuinely extremist behavior doesn't excuse genuine Federal abuses of power -- or state ones, either.
 
Nor does it justify the turning away from these sorry matters by many sanctimonious "liberals."
 
H.
_______________
 
Thanks, Blue.  I obviously have a very fundamentalist view of the Bill of Rights.
 
Koresh, of the Waco situation, could have easily been taken quietly in the city of Waco itself -- thus avoiding the lethal debacle.  The charge against him was relatively minor, as I recall.  Randy Weaver was simply an eccentric "white separatist" who lived with his family in the Idaho backwoods.  The charge against him was a very minor firearms charge, the validity of which was later destroyed publicly by Gerry Spence in the trial that saw Weaver acquitted.
 
During our first year in North Dakota, there was a nationally publicized shoot-out early in 1982 near the little town of Medina.  US Marshals had a warrant for a leader of the far right Posse Comitatus, Gordon Kahl, on an income tax violation.  They could have taken him quietly in Medina but, instead, set up a country road blockade.  In the ensuing shootout, two marshals were killed -- and weeks later, Kahl was shot  in Arkansas. Some with him in the ND affair drew long prison terms.
 
The economic basis for much of the Posse activity -- and also the formation of the mostly non-violent militia groups -- stemmed from economic marginality; and the loss, in the Northern Plains, of thousands of small farms and ranches. This loss had been denounced by, among others, Democratic ND Gov, George Sinner, when I was being presented by him with the state's annual Martin Luther King, Jr social justice award in 1989.  In the mid '90s, I wrote a "thought paper" which, in no way excusing any militia violence, discussed the deplorable economic roots involved.  A number of people then tagged me as a "militia supporter" -- which was ridiculous and sadly shabby.  But others saw my basic point.
 
There are a vast number of these Federal excesses and abuses.  The "respectables" -- and the respectable liberals -- shy from any involvement save, perhaps, to denounce the targets of the Federals.  All of this becomes woven into the very current anti-government [and anti-liberal] folklore of this country.
 
H
_________________________
 
Just a few loose ends thoughts
 
Whether one has a Marxist perspective or not, anyone who scratches the surface objectively has to see the economic basis for a great many of the current social ills plaguing the country [or other countries]  This obviously applies to much of crime and usage of genuinely dangerous drugs -- and to various versions of "extremism."  But it's much "easier" to think in terms of "law enforcement" than to dig at the roots in a preventative, let along curative, fashion.  The "disconnect" between the Government and much of the US population is significant in scope.  I think most, if not all of us, on RBB would agree.  Going further, the mushrooming human population globally -- I gather we are on the brink of becoming seven billion soon -- raises a myriad of disconnect situations between people and government.  Elimination of capitalism, or even its significant modification, is obviously necessary but decentralization of government beyond simply the division of powers [state/local] is critical as well.  Large scale and somewhat socialist nations have certainly had their significant problems on many fronts.  In any of these challenges, grassroots people action is always a critical necessity.
 
I give the ACLU and the Southern Poverty Law Center B to B- marks.  ACLU has dodged certain kinds of "controversial" issues that it should have engaged: 2nd Amendment matters [NRA does a fine job handling those but "liberal" support would always be helpful]; or, as another example, the mass seizure of polygamists' children in Texas a couple of years ago -- an extraordinarily blatant action reversed by the Texas Appellate and Supreme courts which found no grounds for the raids and seizure. ACLU came late to that.  If Randy Weaver had been, say, a "minority" separatist, ACLU nationally would have been more concerned.  The Southern regional office of ACLU, then headed by people who had had direct experience in the Southern Movement, made an unsuccessful effort to involve the national body in the Waco issues.  The Southern Poverty Law Center does a good job in its basic region -- Dixie -- but often errs in its judgments when it comes to other parts of the United States where its direct knowledge is really minimal.
 
Most militia entities are simply talk -- bull shooting by military wannabees. Most are nonviolent and few are racist.  And in any of these situations, one does find individual demagogues with their personal self-interest.  The militia thing never caught fire in North Dakota, in part because the state's ethos is not especially incendiary in the overt sense -- and because of the Posse tragedy at Medina.  [It did catch some organizational fire in surrounding areas.]  But in the whole Northern Plains region, including North Dakota and elsewhere, economic marginality [e.g., large-scale loss of land] and a sense of personal powerlessness over one's destiny comprise the major root complex that gives rise to these things.  This certainly applies to at least some hate group phenomena -- such as the Southern Klans.
 
I regularly taught a very well attended course at UND -- "Racism and Hate Groups in America."  It could easily draw a hundred students.  In the early 90s, an interesting film appeared -- "Death and Taxes"  -- dealing with farm/ranch discontent in North Dakota and the Posse situation that had occurred at Medina.  Senator Byron Dorgan's brother ran the ND state NPR affiliate and blocked the film from showing in that venue.  Peter, our youngest son, and then state editor of the Bismarck Tribune, got a copy of it [which I still have somewhere.]  After previewing it, I played the film to the Racism class.  The normally and usually pretty laid back students became extremely emotional in most cases.  Virtually all of them had first hand knowledge of the land loss situation.
 
In one incarnation of that class was the son of a state district judge, based in Grand Forks [our town.]  And, during one of those  class sessions, a deranged tax protester, Reuben Larson, shot the student's father -- the judge -- in court.  Fortunately, the jurist survived but that situation, plus a comparable one at the same time in Texas, led directly to the present [and justified] national courthouse security measures.  [Josie, our youngest, still recalls her St Mary's School area being inundated with lawmen searching for Larson, who they did catch.]
 
H
 
HUNTER GRAY [HUNTER BEAR/JOHN R SALTER JR] Mi'kmaq /St. Francis
Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'
 
I have always lived and worked in the Borderlands.
Our Hunterbear website is now eleven years old..
Check out http://hunterbear.org/directory.htm
 
See - Personal and Detailed Background Narrative:
http://hunterbear.org/narrative.htm
 
See - The Stormy Adoption of an Indian Child (My Father):
http://hunterbear.org/James%20and%20Salter%20and%20Dad.htm
 
And see - Elder Recognition Award
(Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Story Tellers:
http://hunterbear.org/elder_recognition_award_for_2005.htm
 
 


__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

vishnu rmk | 7 May 20:59 2011
Picon

Re: THE ASSASSINATION OF OSAMA BIN LADEN

This ‘comrade’ Fidel is a pure opportunist.

He supported the killings of thousands of Tamils by the Sri Lankan racist regime with the active clandestine support of Indian comprador bourgeoisie.



From: Guillermon <perdiguiller <at> yahoo.com>
To: marxist <at> yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, 7 May 2011 12:44 PM
Subject: [marxist] THE ASSASSINATION OF OSAMA BIN LADEN

 
Reflections by Comrade Fidel

Those persons who deal with these issues know that on September 11 of 2001 our people expressed its solidarity to the US people and offered the modest cooperation that in the area of health we could have offered to the victims of the brutal attack against the Twin Towers in New York.
We also immediately opened our country's airports to the American airplanes that were unable to land anywhere, given the chaos that came about soon after the strike.
The traditional stand adopted by the Cuban Revolution, which was always opposed to any action that could jeopardize the life of civilians, is well known.
Although we resolutely supported the armed struggle against Batista's tyranny, we were, on principle, opposed to any terrorist action that could cause the death of innocent people. Such behavior, which has been maintained for more than half a century, gives us the right to express our views about such a sensitive matter.
On that day, at a public gathering that took place at Ciudad Deportiva, I expressed my conviction that international terrorism could never be erradicated through violence and war.
By the way, Bin Laden was, for many years, a friend of the US, a country that gave him military training; he was also an adversary of the USSR and Socialism. But, whatever the actions attributed to him, the assassination of an unarmed human being while surrounded by his own relatives is something abhorrent. Apparently this is what the government of the most powerful nation that has ever existed did.
In the carefully drafted speech announcing Bin Laden's death Obama asserts as follows:
"…And yet we know that the worst images are those that were unseen to the world. The empty seat at the dinner table. Children who were forced to grow up without their mother or their father. Parents who would never know the feeling of their child's embrace. Nearly 3,000 citizens taken from us, leaving a gaping hole in our hearts."
That paragraph expressed a dramatic truth, but can not prevent honest persons from remembering the unjust wars unleashed by the United States in Iraq and Afghanistan, the hundreds of thousands of children who were forced to grow up without their mothers and fathers and the parents who would never know the feeling of their child's embrace.
Millions of citizens were taken from their villages in Iraq, Afghanistan, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Cuba and many other countries of the world.
Still engraved in the minds of hundreds of millions of persons are also the horrible images of human beings who, in Guantánamo, a Cuban occupied territory, walk down in silence, being submitted for months, and even for years, to unbearable and excruciating tortures. Those are persons who were kidnapped and transferred to secret prisons with the hypocritical connivance of supposedly civilized societies.
Obama has no way to conceal that Osama was executed in front of his children and wives, who are now under the custody of the authorities of Pakistan, a Muslim country of almost 200 million inhabitants, whose laws have been violated, its national dignity offended and its religious traditions desecrated.
How could he now prevent the women and children of the person who was executed out of the law and without any trial from explaining what happened? How could he prevent those images from being broadcast to the world?
On January 28 of 2002 the CBS journalist Dan Rather reported through that TV network that on September 10 of 2001, one day before the attacks against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Osama Bin Laden underwent a hemodialysis at a military hospital in Pakistan. He was physically unfit to hide and take shelter inside deep caves.
Having assassinated him and plunging his corpse into the bottom of the sea are an expression of fear and insecurity which turn him into a far more dangerous person.
The US public opinion itself, after the initial euphoria, will end up by criticizing the methods that, far from protecting its citizen, will multiply the feelings of hatred and revenge against them.

Fidel Castro Ruz
May 4, 2011
8:34 p.m.





__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Steve Cooke | 7 May 23:24 2011
Picon

www.cpgb.org.uk

Weekly Worker 864 - Thursday May 05 2011

The latest edition of the Weekly Worker is now available online at
http://www.cpgb.org.uk/edition.php?issue_id=864

In this week’s issue:

BLOODY END OF US-CREATED MONSTER
Harley Filben looks at the damage wrought by US power in its convulsive decline

LETTERS
Monarchist case; US trembled; Disturbing; Irresponsible; Real deal;
Main issue; In the long run;

A DAY OF ABSOLUTE MONARCHY AND CRIMINALISING REPUBLICANISM
The establishment did not want anything to interfere with the royal
wedding celebrations - including 'unruly' free speech and the
democratic right to protest. Eddie Ford reports

GETTING THE MESSAGE ACROSS
Chris Knight of the Radical Anthropology Group was among those
arrested for attempting a street theatre performance to coincide with
the royal wedding. They were accused of 'conspiracy to cause a public
nuisance' and detained for more than 24 hours. He spoke to Peter
Manson

NO VOTE FOR GALLOWAY
This 'Open letter to the left' was issued by the Manchester-based
blogger, 'Infantile and disorderly', on May 2. Since then it has been
carried by a number of other websites, including RevLeft and the
Alliance for Workers' Liberty. Needless to say, the editors of this
paper disagree with the call not to vote for George Galloway and the
Coalition Against Cuts list - we were for critical support - but we
print it in the interests of debate

CAN THE LEFT WIN OVER THE MEMBERS?
National executive candidate Dave Vincent looks forward to the
conference of the civil service union

FIGHTING STALINISM POLITICALLY
James Turley responds to Paul B Smith

TWO-SIDED RECONCILIATION
Tony Greenstein argues the importance of continuation of Palestinian resistance

EXCELLENT START
Robbie Rix says thank you to one and all

A PDF version of the paper can be downloaded at
http://www.cpgb.org.uk/pdf/ww864.pdf

------------------------------------

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Hunter Gray | 8 May 13:53 2011

Pleasant Opiate

Hastily done,  "stream of consciousness":
 
At some point yesterday afternoon, I'd had enough.  Not from RBB discussion, I assure you, but from the flow of "kept" media news-carrying spin of the last week:  Osama's dead and a myriad of conflicting "lines" but his Al Qaeda is finished, documents reveal that He speculated about new terror approaches, then potential terror schemes, finally active new terror plots amidst re-creations of the 9-11 ethos. Bring the troops home, the troops will not be coming home, a smiling Barack Obama at every point.  Tornado horrors swept away, likewise impending and record massive flooding in the mid-South heading toward deeper Dixie, hardly anything on rising jobless claims. 
 
I felt like a sponge that had absorbed more than the max of dubious waters.
 
I found a flick on Showtime:  White Fang 2/The White Wolf -- a sequel to Jack London's White Fang. Aimed most likely at the Middle School through High School crowd and set in Alaska, it moved rapidly with the challenging adventures of a young Anglo man and White Fang -- his wolf companion -- who, occasionally separated, always reunite and then join forces with friendly Indians and especially an attractive young Native woman.  Concurrently White Fang and an attractive female white wolf commence a mutually coy back and forth relationship.  Scoundrely Anglo gold miners threaten Nature but their schemes are undone by the aforementioned Forces of Good, the chief Anglo villain is trampled to death by angry caribou, the young guy and his Native lady are formally joined as are White Fang and the white wolf -- and the final scene shows them all together -- with a litter of wolf pups.
 
Marxist analysis couldn't make a dent in this complex -- and Freud, who might get a little further, would be knocked out of action by the caribou.
 
Well, it was a better solution than Drink.  And, actually, I liked it.
 
H
HUNTER GRAY [HUNTER BEAR/JOHN R SALTER JR] Mi'kmaq /St. Francis
Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'
 
I have always lived and worked in the Borderlands.
Our Hunterbear website is now eleven years old..
Check out http://hunterbear.org/directory.htm
 
See - Personal and Detailed Background Narrative:
http://hunterbear.org/narrative.htm
 
See - The Stormy Adoption of an Indian Child (My Father):
http://hunterbear.org/James%20and%20Salter%20and%20Dad.htm
 
And see - Elder Recognition Award
(Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Story Tellers:
http://hunterbear.org/elder_recognition_award_for_2005.htm
 
 


__._,_.___

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31

Guillermon | 10 May 18:02 2011
Picon

LIES AND MYSTERIES SURROUNDING BIN LADEN’S DEATH

Reflections by Comrade Fidel

The men who executed Bin Laden did not act on their own: they were following orders from the US Government. 
They had gone through a rigorous selection process and were trained to accomplish special missions.  It is
known that the US President can even communicate with a soldier in combat.

A few hours after accomplishing that mission in the Pakistani city of Abbottabad, home to the most
prestigious military academy of that country as well as important combat units, the White House offered
the world's public opinion a carefully drafted version about the death of Osama Bin Laden, the chief of Al Qaeda.

Of course, the world and the international media focused their attention on the issue, thus pushing all
other public news into the background.

The US TV networks broadcast the President's carefully drafted speech and showed images of the public's reaction.

It was obvious that the world realized how sensitive the matter was.  Pakistan is a country of 171 841 000
inhabitants –where the US and NATO have been carrying out a devastating war for ten years now- that has
nuclear weapons and is a traditional ally of the United States.

There is no doubt that this Muslim country can not agree with the bloody war that the United States and its
allies are waging against Afghanistan, another Muslim country with which it shares the troublesome and
mountainous border traced by the British colonial empire.  Common tribes live on both sides of the
demarcation line.

The American press itself understood that the President was concealing almost the entire information.

The western news agencies –ANSA, AFP, AP, REUTERS and EFE- the press and important websites have
published interesting reports about the incident.

The New York Times asserts that facts differed greatly from the official version announced on Tuesday by
the White House and top intelligence officials, according to which Bin Laden's death –who they finally
recognized was unarmed, although they said he `resisted'- had occurred in the middle of an intense gun battle.

But, according to the New York daily, "the raid, though chaotic and bloody, was extremely one-sided, with a
force of more than 20 Navy SEAL members quickly dispatching the handful of men protecting Bin Laden."

 The New York Times states that "the only shots fired by those in the compound came at the beginning of the
operation, exactly when Bin Laden's trusted courier, Abu Ahmed al-Kuwaiti, opened fire from behind the
door of the guesthouse adjacent to the house where Bin Laden was hiding."
"After the SEAL members shot and killed Mr. Kuwaiti and a woman in the guesthouse, the Americans were never
fired upon again", the newspaper states based on reports from said sources, whose identity was not
revealed…. 
On Tuesday, the White House spokesman, Jay Carney, in an account of events, had asserted that in the early
hours of Monday morning, the US commando "were engaged in a firefight throughout the operation." 
Leon E. Panetta, the director of the C.I.A., said, "there were some firefights that were going on" as these
US elite military were clearing the upper floors of the residential compound where Bin Laden was hiding.

However, the newspaper asserts that, although Bin Laden had not raised any weapon when he was gunned down,
the commandos that found him in one of the rooms "saw Osama bin Laden with an AK-47 and a Makarov pistol in
arm's reach."

Today, May 6, news continue to pour in.

From Washington, one of the agencies reports that a sole gunman had shot against the US forces. It continues
to report that, on Sunday evening, "several helicopters ferry 79 commandos towards Osama bin Laden's
compound in Abbottabad, north of Islamabad, flying low to avoid detection by radar, as Pakistan has not
been told of the raid in advance. 

"Two helicopters deliver more than 20 US Navy SEALs to the residence, which has four-to-six meter walls
covered with barbed wire. One of the choppers, a MH-60 Blackhawk apparently modified to evade radar, is
out of commission due to "mechanical failure," according to initial reports from US officials. 

"One group of commandos moves toward a smaller guest house next to the compound's main building. Bin
Laden's trusted courier opens fire and is shot and killed, along with his wife.

The courier is the only man at the compound who fires on the Americans, contrary to earlier accounts from the
White House that described a firefight throughout the nearly 40-minute operation. 

 "…Another US special forces team enters the main three-story house."

"… They encounter the courier's brother…who was shot and killed", according to a US official who offered
no further details. According to NBC news, the man "has one hand behind his back" when the team entered the
room, "causing the SEALs to suspect he may have a gun, which turns out not to be the case.

 "The commandos move up the stairs and in one of the rooms meet up with Bin Laden's adult son, Khalid, who is
also killed…" 

"On the top floor, they find Bin Laden and his wife in the bedroom. She reportedly tries to move between her
husband and the commandos, and is shot in the leg. Bin Laden, who gives no signal of surrender, is shot in the
head, and some media say he is also struck in the chest. Earlier versions of the raid said Bin Laden
"resisted" and that he had used his wife as a human shield, but the White House later acknowledges those
details are incorrect.

"President Barack Obama, following events from the White House, is told the SEALs have tentatively
identified Bin Laden. A Time magazine report, based on an interview with CIA Director Leon Panetta,
suggests Bin Laden was killed less than 25 minutes into the raid.

-"In Bin Laden's room, the US team finds an AK-47 assault rifle and a 9 mm Russian pistol. Other weapons are
discovered in the compound, but no further details are given.

"The special forces find cash and telephone numbers sown into Bin Laden's clothing..."

"The Navy SEALs hauled away everything that could offer a lead to further information: note pads, the five
computers, 10 hard drives and more than 100 storage devices (CDs, DVDs, USB). 

"…The U.S. team destroys the downed helicopter after moving the women and children in the compound to a
safe area.

"…Thirty eight minutes after the start of the raid, U.S. helicopters fly away, carrying away the corpse of
Bin Laden."

The AP published information of political and also human interest:
"One of three wives living with Osama Bin Laden told Pakistani interrogators she had been staying in the
Al-Qaeda chief's hideout for five years, and could be a key source of information about how he avoided
capture for so long, a Pakistani intelligence official said Friday."
 "Bin Laden's wife, identified as Yemeni-born Amal Ahmed Abdullfattah, said she never left the upper
floors of the house the entire time she was there.
"She and Bin Laden's other two wives are being interrogated in Pakistan after they were taken into custody
following Monday's American raid on Bin Laden's compound in the town of Abbottabad. Pakistani
authorities are also holding eight or nine children who were found there after the U.S. commandos left.
"Given shifting and incomplete accounts from U.S. officials about what happened during the raid,
testimony from Bin Laden's wives may be significant in unveiling details about the operation.
"Their accounts could also help show how Bin Laden spent his time and managed to stay hidden, living in a
large house close to a military academy in a garrison town, a two-and-a-half hours' drive from the
capital, Islamabad.
"The Pakistani official said CIA officers had not been given access to the women in custody."
"The proximity of Bin Laden's hideout to the military garrison and the Pakistani capital has also raised
suspicions in Washington that Bin Laden may have been protected by Pakistani security forces while on the run."
 The EFE news agency inquired what Pakistan citizens thought about that. 
According to that agency, 66 per cent of Pakistanis do not believe that the US Special Forces killed Osama
Bin Laden, the leader of Al Qaeda; they think they killed another person, according to a joint poll ran by
the British demoscopic institute, YouGov, and Polis, from Cambridge University.
The poll was said to have been carried out among Internet users, who usually have a higher educational
level, in three big cities:  Karachi, Islamabad and Lahore.  The poll excluded rural demographic groups,
which makes results to be all the more surprising, according to researchers.

Reportedly, 75 per cent of those polled said they also disapproved the violation of Pakistan's
sovereignty by the United States during the operation to capture and kill Bin Laden.

It was also reported that less than three fourths of those polled do not believe Bin Laden approved the 9/11
attacks against the United States, which justified the US invasion in Afghanistan and the war against
Islamic terrorism.

According to the poll, 74 per cent think that Washington's government does not have any respect for Islam
and considers itself at war with the Islamic world; 70 per cent disapproves the Pakistani policy of
accepting US economic aid.

Eighty six per cent are said to oppose also to the fact that the Pakistani government may in the future –and
criticized the possibility that they may have done in the past- authorize attacks using drones against
military groups.

Sixty one per cent of the Pakistanis who were interrogated said they sympathized with the Taliban or
believed they could represent respectable viewpoints, against only 21 per cent who are radically
opposed to them.

Reuters equally published some interesting reports:

"One of Osama bin Laden's wives told Pakistani interrogators that the Al Qaeda leader and his family had
been living for five years in the compound where he was killed by U.S. forces this week, a security official
said on Friday.
"The official, who identified the woman as Amal Ahmed Abdulfattah, the youngest of Bin Laden's three
wives, told Reuters she was wounded in the raid.
"The security official said Abdulfattah told investigators: `We have been living there for the past five years'."
"Pakistani security forces took between 15 and 16 people into custody from the compound after U.S. forces
removed Bin Laden's body, said the security official. Those detained included Bin Laden's three wives
and several children."
According to a report published by ANSA, a US drone killed today no less than 15 persons in Waziristan, north
of Pakistan.  Others were seriously injured.  But, who would care about those daily killings in that country?

However, I ask myself one question: Why is there so much coincidence between the assassination that was
carried out at Abbottabad and the attempt to simultaneously assassinate Gaddafi?

One of Gaddafi's youngest sons, who was not involved with political issues, Sarif al Arab, was accompanied
by his little son and two little cousins at the house where he lived; Gaddafi and his wife had visited him
shortly before the attacks launched by NATO bombers.  The house was destroyed; Sarif al Arab and the three
kids were killed.  Gaddafi and his wife had left shortly before the attack.  That was an unprecedented
event.  But the world has hardly known about that.

Was it a mere chance that such an event coincided with the attack against Osama Bin Laden's refuge, which was
perfectly known by the US government, which kept a close watch on it?

News released today by Vatican City reported as follows:

"May 6 (ANSA) - Giovanni Innocenzo Martinelli, Apostolic Vicar of Tripoli, said today to the Vatican's
agency FIDES: `I certainly do not want to interfere with the political activity of anyone, but I have the
duty to declare that the bombings on Libya are immoral'.

"I am surprised that statements were made on the fact that I should deal only with spiritual matters and that
the bombings have been authorized by the UN.  The UN, NATO or the European Union doesn't have the moral
authority to decide to bomb Libya, he said."

"Let me stress that bombing is not dictated my moral or social conscience of the West or humanity in general.
Bombing is always an immoral act."

Another news published by ANSA on May 6 reports that the governments of China and Russia expressed their
deep concern about the war in Libya and said they will work together to call for a cease fire.

According to the Chinese Foreign Minister Jechi Yang, they strongly believed that the most important goal
was to achieve an immediate cease fire.

Truly worrying events are happening.

Fidel Castro Ruz
May 6, 2011
8:17 p.m

------------------------------------

"[C]apital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."
--Marx, Capital, Vol. 1, Chapter 31


Gmane