Vickram Crishna | 1 Apr 10:46 2008
Picon

Re: A new public wireless interface: Street Radio by Hivenetworks

I cannot express how delighted I am to hear of your work.

Apart from the obvious value of your own 'geo-significant' art event, the methodology itself is a validation of a technical solution to 'broadcasting' that I, among others, have been championing for a long while (I have a post on this in the upper blog address in my sig).

The combination of data and analogue super low power (and I suspect, super inexpensive in most configurations) signal distribution is one that I feel innately will work better for village environments. And discontiguous communities in urban settings as well.

In fact, the only bar to such a solution is the pig-headed attitude of radio regulators.
 
Vickram
http://communicall.wordpress.com
http://vvcrishna.wordpress.com


----- Original Message ----
From: Armin Medosch <armin <at> easynet.co.uk>
To: spectre <spectre <at> mikrolisten.de>; nettime-l <nettime-l <at> kein.org>; consume-thenet <at> lists.consume.net; wsfii-discuss <wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org>
Cc: NeueszuWLAN <wlannews <at> freifunk.net>; uo <at> twenteenthcentury.com; nodel-discuss <nodel-discuss <at> one.server1.org>; locative <at> 2008.x-i.net
Sent: Thursday, 27 March, 2008 3:00:33 PM
Subject: [wsfii-discuss] A new public wireless interface: Street Radio by Hivenetworks

sorry for x-posting

a.
-------------------

A new public wireless interface: Hivenetworks successfully launch
'Street Radio' in Southampton


On Friday the 14th of March 2008 ten 'street radio' nodes went live in
Southampton narrowcasting Hidden Histories -- stories from Southamptons
Oral History Archive selected and arranged to correspond with the
location of the 10 nodes.

Participants started to meet at around 11 am at the gallery cafe in
Southampton's Civic Centre. There they received maps of the Hidden
Histories trail and those who needed them could borrow little FM radio
receivers.

[...]


On a tight budget and close deadline, we were very happy to be able to
deliver. On 10 light poles in the centre of Southampton on Above Bar
street weather proof little boxes have been mounted which contain
repurposed commercially available hardware. The unique hard- software
combination implemented by Hivenetworks is playing soundfiles in a loop
on FM radio on 89.0 MHtz. The very low powered USB FM transmitters are
said to have a range of about 10 to 15 meters. Thus, around each
lighhtpole in a radius of 30 meters approximately you can hear one
particular radio art piece created by me with excerpts from the Oral
History Archive. The boxes also scan the surroundings for mobile phones
with the bluetooth function on. Asking the carrier of the mobile phone
to accept a message first, a short bluetooth text message is transmitted
announcing the node, the frequency and its content. The Hiveware
contained in the boxes also creates a mesh network based on the OLSR
protocol. Currently we do not provide access point services, the mesh is
only there for maintainance reasons. Via the internet we can 'see' the
boxes in Southampton and check if they are working and upload new
content.

I have been working on this project since the beginning of last autumn
but the past two months in particular I was in oral history universe. I
could never have finished the 10 short audio pieces on time without the
support of Sheila Jemima and Padmini Broomfield from the OHU. They know
the archive very well and have carried out already many projects where
they made selections and put together specific excerpts of the archive,
from Titanic to maritime workers, female seafarers and early memories of
cinematic experiences. In the remnants of the bombed out Holyrood Church
they have created a different type of oral history station, a piece of
hardware with buttons to select different audio extracts from. Their
advise and expertise saved me a lot of time and provided valuable
guidance and inspiration. So for about 2 months continuously I spent
under the headphones, listening through the archive, becoming intimate
with voices and the tales that they told. After such an intense phase of
work in seclusion, me and the voices from the past, spending together
hours and hours, it was a particular type of joy for me to see and hear
this project launched.

First of all, it worked. To be precise, 9 out of 10 nodes worked. One,
the 10th and last node by chance, had a technical failure which could
not be solved by means of software or frequent restarts -- the whole box
has to be replaced which we will do shortly. For a pilot project with
such a smalll budget 9 out of 10 was not a bad achievement. Moreover,
the FM reception in the vicinity of the nodes was generally very good.
Because of traffic noise it is advisable to use headphones, yet by using
those the voices are coming through quite clearly and very well
understandable. Some of the nodes have a slight high pitched buzz at the
background, but it is not loud enough to diminish the experience and
other nodes are totally clear. The bluetooth function worked but very
very slowly, which is something to be addressed in the future.

But technical functioning aside, the project also worked as a whole. I
simple loved drifting from one node to the other, headphones on, radio
in hand, listening in to one story and then, after a while, moving on to
the next.

Full story: http://www.thenextlayer.org/node/378


The article contains links to further texts, images, a sound example and
external links.




_______________________________________________
wsfii-discuss mailing list
wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss


Yahoo! for Good helps you make a difference
_______________________________________________
wsfii-discuss mailing list
wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss
Vickram Crishna | 1 Apr 10:46 2008
Picon

Re: A new public wireless interface: Street Radio by Hivenetworks

I cannot express how delighted I am to hear of your work.

Apart from the obvious value of your own 'geo-significant' art event, the methodology itself is a validation of a technical solution to 'broadcasting' that I, among others, have been championing for a long while (I have a post on this in the upper blog address in my sig).

The combination of data and analogue super low power (and I suspect, super inexpensive in most configurations) signal distribution is one that I feel innately will work better for village environments. And discontiguous communities in urban settings as well.

In fact, the only bar to such a solution is the pig-headed attitude of radio regulators.
 
Vickram
http://communicall.wordpress.com
http://vvcrishna.wordpress.com


----- Original Message ----
From: Armin Medosch <armin <at> easynet.co.uk>
To: spectre <spectre <at> mikrolisten.de>; nettime-l <nettime-l <at> kein.org>; consume-thenet <at> lists.consume.net; wsfii-discuss <wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org>
Cc: NeueszuWLAN <wlannews <at> freifunk.net>; uo <at> twenteenthcentury.com; nodel-discuss <nodel-discuss <at> one.server1.org>; locative <at> 2008.x-i.net
Sent: Thursday, 27 March, 2008 3:00:33 PM
Subject: [wsfii-discuss] A new public wireless interface: Street Radio by Hivenetworks

sorry for x-posting

a.
-------------------

A new public wireless interface: Hivenetworks successfully launch
'Street Radio' in Southampton


On Friday the 14th of March 2008 ten 'street radio' nodes went live in
Southampton narrowcasting Hidden Histories -- stories from Southamptons
Oral History Archive selected and arranged to correspond with the
location of the 10 nodes.

Participants started to meet at around 11 am at the gallery cafe in
Southampton's Civic Centre. There they received maps of the Hidden
Histories trail and those who needed them could borrow little FM radio
receivers.

[...]


On a tight budget and close deadline, we were very happy to be able to
deliver. On 10 light poles in the centre of Southampton on Above Bar
street weather proof little boxes have been mounted which contain
repurposed commercially available hardware. The unique hard- software
combination implemented by Hivenetworks is playing soundfiles in a loop
on FM radio on 89.0 MHtz. The very low powered USB FM transmitters are
said to have a range of about 10 to 15 meters. Thus, around each
lighhtpole in a radius of 30 meters approximately you can hear one
particular radio art piece created by me with excerpts from the Oral
History Archive. The boxes also scan the surroundings for mobile phones
with the bluetooth function on. Asking the carrier of the mobile phone
to accept a message first, a short bluetooth text message is transmitted
announcing the node, the frequency and its content. The Hiveware
contained in the boxes also creates a mesh network based on the OLSR
protocol. Currently we do not provide access point services, the mesh is
only there for maintainance reasons. Via the internet we can 'see' the
boxes in Southampton and check if they are working and upload new
content.

I have been working on this project since the beginning of last autumn
but the past two months in particular I was in oral history universe. I
could never have finished the 10 short audio pieces on time without the
support of Sheila Jemima and Padmini Broomfield from the OHU. They know
the archive very well and have carried out already many projects where
they made selections and put together specific excerpts of the archive,
from Titanic to maritime workers, female seafarers and early memories of
cinematic experiences. In the remnants of the bombed out Holyrood Church
they have created a different type of oral history station, a piece of
hardware with buttons to select different audio extracts from. Their
advise and expertise saved me a lot of time and provided valuable
guidance and inspiration. So for about 2 months continuously I spent
under the headphones, listening through the archive, becoming intimate
with voices and the tales that they told. After such an intense phase of
work in seclusion, me and the voices from the past, spending together
hours and hours, it was a particular type of joy for me to see and hear
this project launched.

First of all, it worked. To be precise, 9 out of 10 nodes worked. One,
the 10th and last node by chance, had a technical failure which could
not be solved by means of software or frequent restarts -- the whole box
has to be replaced which we will do shortly. For a pilot project with
such a smalll budget 9 out of 10 was not a bad achievement. Moreover,
the FM reception in the vicinity of the nodes was generally very good.
Because of traffic noise it is advisable to use headphones, yet by using
those the voices are coming through quite clearly and very well
understandable. Some of the nodes have a slight high pitched buzz at the
background, but it is not loud enough to diminish the experience and
other nodes are totally clear. The bluetooth function worked but very
very slowly, which is something to be addressed in the future.

But technical functioning aside, the project also worked as a whole. I
simple loved drifting from one node to the other, headphones on, radio
in hand, listening in to one story and then, after a while, moving on to
the next.

Full story: http://www.thenextlayer.org/node/378


The article contains links to further texts, images, a sound example and
external links.




_______________________________________________
wsfii-discuss mailing list
wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss


Sent from Yahoo! Mail.
A Smarter Inbox.
_______________________________________________
wsfii-discuss mailing list
wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss
Vickram Crishna | 1 Apr 10:47 2008
Picon

Re: A new public wireless interface: Street Radio by Hivenetworks

I cannot express how delighted I am to hear of your work.

Apart from the obvious value of your own 'geo-significant' art event, the methodology itself is a validation of a technical solution to 'brodcasting' that I, among others, have been championing for a long while. The combination of data and analogue super low power (and I suspect, super inexpensive in most configurations) signal distribution is one that I feel innately will work better for village environments. And discontiguous communities in urban settings as well. In fact, the only bar to such a solution is the pig-headed attitude of radio regulators.
 
Vickram
http://communicall.wordpress.com
http://vvcrishna.wordpress.com


----- Original Message ----
From: Armin Medosch <armin <at> easynet.co.uk>
To: spectre <spectre <at> mikrolisten.de>; nettime-l <nettime-l <at> kein.org>; consume-thenet <at> lists.consume.net; wsfii-discuss <wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org>
Cc: NeueszuWLAN <wlannews <at> freifunk.net>; uo <at> twenteenthcentury.com; nodel-discuss <nodel-discuss <at> one.server1.org>; locative <at> 2008.x-i.net
Sent: Thursday, 27 March, 2008 3:00:33 PM
Subject: [wsfii-discuss] A new public wireless interface: Street Radio by Hivenetworks

sorry for x-posting

a.
-------------------

A new public wireless interface: Hivenetworks successfully launch
'Street Radio' in Southampton


On Friday the 14th of March 2008 ten 'street radio' nodes went live in
Southampton narrowcasting Hidden Histories -- stories from Southamptons
Oral History Archive selected and arranged to correspond with the
location of the 10 nodes.

Participants started to meet at around 11 am at the gallery cafe in
Southampton's Civic Centre. There they received maps of the Hidden
Histories trail and those who needed them could borrow little FM radio
receivers.

[...]


On a tight budget and close deadline, we were very happy to be able to
deliver. On 10 light poles in the centre of Southampton on Above Bar
street weather proof little boxes have been mounted which contain
repurposed commercially available hardware. The unique hard- software
combination implemented by Hivenetworks is playing soundfiles in a loop
on FM radio on 89.0 MHtz. The very low powered USB FM transmitters are
said to have a range of about 10 to 15 meters. Thus, around each
lighhtpole in a radius of 30 meters approximately you can hear one
particular radio art piece created by me with excerpts from the Oral
History Archive. The boxes also scan the surroundings for mobile phones
with the bluetooth function on. Asking the carrier of the mobile phone
to accept a message first, a short bluetooth text message is transmitted
announcing the node, the frequency and its content. The Hiveware
contained in the boxes also creates a mesh network based on the OLSR
protocol. Currently we do not provide access point services, the mesh is
only there for maintainance reasons. Via the internet we can 'see' the
boxes in Southampton and check if they are working and upload new
content.

I have been working on this project since the beginning of last autumn
but the past two months in particular I was in oral history universe. I
could never have finished the 10 short audio pieces on time without the
support of Sheila Jemima and Padmini Broomfield from the OHU. They know
the archive very well and have carried out already many projects where
they made selections and put together specific excerpts of the archive,
from Titanic to maritime workers, female seafarers and early memories of
cinematic experiences. In the remnants of the bombed out Holyrood Church
they have created a different type of oral history station, a piece of
hardware with buttons to select different audio extracts from. Their
advise and expertise saved me a lot of time and provided valuable
guidance and inspiration. So for about 2 months continuously I spent
under the headphones, listening through the archive, becoming intimate
with voices and the tales that they told. After such an intense phase of
work in seclusion, me and the voices from the past, spending together
hours and hours, it was a particular type of joy for me to see and hear
this project launched.

First of all, it worked. To be precise, 9 out of 10 nodes worked. One,
the 10th and last node by chance, had a technical failure which could
not be solved by means of software or frequent restarts -- the whole box
has to be replaced which we will do shortly. For a pilot project with
such a smalll budget 9 out of 10 was not a bad achievement. Moreover,
the FM reception in the vicinity of the nodes was generally very good.
Because of traffic noise it is advisable to use headphones, yet by using
those the voices are coming through quite clearly and very well
understandable. Some of the nodes have a slight high pitched buzz at the
background, but it is not loud enough to diminish the experience and
other nodes are totally clear. The bluetooth function worked but very
very slowly, which is something to be addressed in the future.

But technical functioning aside, the project also worked as a whole. I
simple loved drifting from one node to the other, headphones on, radio
in hand, listening in to one story and then, after a while, moving on to
the next.

Full story: http://www.thenextlayer.org/node/378


The article contains links to further texts, images, a sound example and
external links.




_______________________________________________
wsfii-discuss mailing list
wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss


Sent from Yahoo! Mail.
A Smarter Inbox.
_______________________________________________
wsfii-discuss mailing list
wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss
Vickram Crishna | 1 Apr 11:09 2008
Picon

Re: A new public wireless interface: Street Radio by Hivenetworks

Sorry about the multiple posts: I would like to blame Yahoo exclusively, for telling me the mail didn't go, when it obviously did, in fact.
 
Vickram
http://communicall.wordpress.com
http://vvcrishna.wordpress.com


----- Original Message ----
From: Vickram Crishna <v1clist <at> yahoo.co.uk>
To: Discuss list on the World Summit on Free Information Infrastructure <wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org>
Sent: Tuesday, 1 April, 2008 1:47:47 PM
Subject: Re: [wsfii-discuss] A new public wireless interface: Street Radio by Hivenetworks

I cannot express how delighted I am to hear of your work.

Apart from the obvious value of your own 'geo-significant' art event, the methodology itself is a validation of a technical solution to 'brodcasting' that I, among others, have been championing for a long while. The combination of data and analogue super low power (and I suspect, super inexpensive in most configurations) signal distribution is one that I feel innately will work better for village environments. And discontiguous communities in urban settings as well. In fact, the only bar to such a solution is the pig-headed attitude of radio regulators.
 
Vickram
http://communicall.wordpress.com
http://vvcrishna.wordpress.com


----- Original Message ----
From: Armin Medosch <armin <at> easynet.co.uk>
To: spectre <spectre <at> mikrolisten.de>; nettime-l <nettime-l <at> kein.org>; consume-thenet <at> lists.consume.net; wsfii-discuss <wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org>
Cc: NeueszuWLAN <wlannews <at> freifunk.net>; uo <at> twenteenthcentury.com; nodel-discuss <nodel-discuss <at> one.server1.org>; locative <at> 2008.x-i.net
Sent: Thursday, 27 March, 2008 3:00:33 PM
Subject: [wsfii-discuss] A new public wireless interface: Street Radio by Hivenetworks

sorry for x-posting

a.
-------------------

A new public wireless interface: Hivenetworks successfully launch
'Street Radio' in Southampton


On Friday the 14th of March 2008 ten 'street radio' nodes went live in
Southampton narrowcasting Hidden Histories -- stories from Southamptons
Oral History Archive selected and arranged to correspond with the
location of the 10 nodes.

Participants started to meet at around 11 am at the gallery cafe in
Southampton's Civic Centre. There they received maps of the Hidden
Histories trail and those who needed them could borrow little FM radio
receivers.

[...]


On a tight budget and close deadline, we were very happy to be able to
deliver. On 10 light poles in the centre of Southampton on Above Bar
street weather proof little boxes have been mounted which contain
repurposed commercially available hardware. The unique hard- software
combination implemented by Hivenetworks is playing soundfiles in a loop
on FM radio on 89.0 MHtz. The very low powered USB FM transmitters are
said to have a range of about 10 to 15 meters. Thus, around each
lighhtpole in a radius of 30 meters approximately you can hear one
particular radio art piece created by me with excerpts from the Oral
History Archive. The boxes also scan the surroundings for mobile phones
with the bluetooth function on. Asking the carrier of the mobile phone
to accept a message first, a short bluetooth text message is transmitted
announcing the node, the frequency and its content. The Hiveware
contained in the boxes also creates a mesh network based on the OLSR
protocol. Currently we do not provide access point services, the mesh is
only there for maintainance reasons. Via the internet we can 'see' the
boxes in Southampton and check if they are working and upload new
content.

I have been working on this project since the beginning of last autumn
but the past two months in particular I was in oral history universe. I
could never have finished the 10 short audio pieces on time without the
support of Sheila Jemima and Padmini Broomfield from the OHU. They know
the archive very well and have carried out already many projects where
they made selections and put together specific excerpts of the archive,
from Titanic to maritime workers, female seafarers and early memories of
cinematic experiences. In the remnants of the bombed out Holyrood Church
they have created a different type of oral history station, a piece of
hardware with buttons to select different audio extracts from. Their
advise and expertise saved me a lot of time and provided valuable
guidance and inspiration. So for about 2 months continuously I spent
under the headphones, listening through the archive, becoming intimate
with voices and the tales that they told. After such an intense phase of
work in seclusion, me and the voices from the past, spending together
hours and hours, it was a particular type of joy for me to see and hear
this project launched.

First of all, it worked. To be precise, 9 out of 10 nodes worked. One,
the 10th and last node by chance, had a technical failure which could
not be solved by means of software or frequent restarts -- the whole box
has to be replaced which we will do shortly. For a pilot project with
such a smalll budget 9 out of 10 was not a bad achievement. Moreover,
the FM reception in the vicinity of the nodes was generally very good.
Because of traffic noise it is advisable to use headphones, yet by using
those the voices are coming through quite clearly and very well
understandable. Some of the nodes have a slight high pitched buzz at the
background, but it is not loud enough to diminish the experience and
other nodes are totally clear. The bluetooth function worked but very
very slowly, which is something to be addressed in the future.

But technical functioning aside, the project also worked as a whole. I
simple loved drifting from one node to the other, headphones on, radio
in hand, listening in to one story and then, after a while, moving on to
the next.

Full story: http://www.thenextlayer.org/node/378


The article contains links to further texts, images, a sound example and
external links.




_______________________________________________
wsfii-discuss mailing list
wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss


Sent from Yahoo! Mail.
A Smarter Inbox.


Sent from Yahoo! Mail.
A Smarter Inbox.
_______________________________________________
wsfii-discuss mailing list
wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss
Vickram Crishna | 6 Apr 07:34 2008
Picon

Re: [AirJaldi-Summit] Cell Phone Mesh?

How about using open-source software based GSM switches on PCs as 'range extenders' for areas where cell-phone coverage is weak/unavailable/uneconomical? Perhaps an appropriate addition to existing ITU resolutions/recommendations on the use of GSM (900/1800 MHz/+?) by member countries would put this into an acceptable framework.
 
Alternatively, if the software can be ported to Symbian/ME, perhaps standalone cellphones can themselves be tweaked to act as mesh nodes. Has any work been done in this area? Do the energy requirements make this impractical?
 
Vickram
http://communicall.wordpress.com
http://vvcrishna.wordpress.com


----- Original Message ----
From: Stan. SWAN <stan.swan <at> gmail.com>
To: Xavier Leonard <X.L <at> headsonfire.org>; Summit <at> lists.airjaldi.com
Sent: Saturday, 5 April, 2008 5:52:41 AM
Subject: Re: [AirJaldi-Summit] Cell Phone Mesh?

Yes- often pondered when in remote regions beyond cellular coverage,
especially since most folks usually now have a cell phone in their
pocket anyway,but service providers have got things pretty well sewn
up...  Where is this intended & what ranges? Budget ? Security?

THOUGHT: As most cell phones now have inbuilt (& free) 2.4GHz
Bluetooth, how about range extension with a BT repeater/antenna? This
may be at least suitable for txt & pictures. I've managed ~½km LOS
with BT at the FP of a "wokfi" =>
www.usbwifi.orconhosting.net.nz/btscoop.jpg.

Another thought-  1.8/1.9/2.4GHz GHz cordless DECT style phones are
now pretty cheap & naturally have intercom facilities, so consider
these in conjunction with add on  DECT antenna/repeaters ?

I assume that  UHF ( ~ 470MHz) PRS type ½ duplex 2 way radios are not
suitable? These readily cover several km ( LOS ~10km) & are dirt
cheap. The lower freq is less influenced by obstacles & terrain as
well- even in heavy rain forest here in NZ we can usually manage ½-1km
OK.  Stan

On 03/04/2008, Xavier Leonard <X.L <at> headsonfire.org> wrote:
>
>
> Hi--
> Checking to see if anyone here can put in touch with someone working on
> creating peer-to-peer  communication between cell phones, independent of a
> cellular service provider-- maybe using the transceiver capabilities of the
> devices to deploy a mesh network for phone calls.
> If you've heard of any related work, please let me know.
>
>
> For the uninitiated, here's a link to company that's working on a commercial
> version:
> http://www.terranet.se/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=47&Itemid=87
> --
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
>  Xavier Leonard
>  Heads On Fire::Fab Lab
>  4305 University Ave., Suite 130
>  San Diego, CA 92105
>  ph.:619.964.6522 fx.:954.208.9573
X.L <at> headsonfire.org  http://www.headsonfire.org
>  "Fulfilling the promise of technology through community centered
>  collaborations."
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> _______________________________________________
>  Summit mailing list
Summit <at> lists.airjaldi.com
> http://lists.airjaldi.com/mailman/listinfo/summit_lists.airjaldi.com
>
>


--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Stan. SWAN - Educator/writer/consultant (ICT-Electronics-Sustainable Energy)
EMAIL: => stan.swan <at> gmail.com      & (Work)  => stan.swan <at> weltec.ac.nz
CELL:  (64)-021-672-958      HOME: (64)-(4)-562-7494    GST Reg: 36-921-021
POSTAL:  24 Tuatoru St,  Eastbourne-L.H.,  Wellington 5013,  NEW ZEALAND.

_______________________________________________
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Summit <at> lists.airjaldi.com
http://lists.airjaldi.com/mailman/listinfo/summit_lists.airjaldi.com


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Vickram Crishna | 6 Apr 07:37 2008
Picon

Wsfii site

I was under the impression that the site was up at okfn, and remember that a  number of people were working on upgrading the content not too long back, but find in fact that is a link to a non-existent URL (wsfii.org). If it is somewhere else, can the links be updated please, both at okfn and wikipedia?
 
Vickram
http://communicall.wordpress.com
http://vvcrishna.wordpress.com

Yahoo! for Good helps you make a difference
_______________________________________________
wsfii-discuss mailing list
wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss
Bjarke Nielsen | 6 Apr 16:17 2008
Picon

Re: Wsfii site

Dear Vickram and others !  :-)

I also experienced that there were no access to http://WSFII.org. - After some research and dialog we have ended up that DIIRWB now has paid for renewing of the domain-name, and very-very soon the http://WSFII.org will be accesable again, meaning that links no longer will be broken . . .

Warm greetings from Bjarke  :-)


Vickram Crishna skrev:
<!-- DIV {margin:0px;} -->
I was under the impression that the site was up at okfn, and remember that a  number of people were working on upgrading the content not too long back, but find in fact that is a link to a non-existent URL (wsfii.org). If it is somewhere else, can the links be updated please, both at okfn and wikipedia?
 
Vickram
http://communicall.wordpress.com
http://vvcrishna.wordpress.com

Yahoo! for Good helps you make a difference _______________________________________________ wsfii-discuss mailing list wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss

_______________________________________________
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wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss
Adrian Dabrowski | 7 Apr 03:08 2008
Picon

Re: [AirJaldi-Summit] Cell Phone Mesh?

a few years ago, some friends and i tried to make a proof-of-concept 
cell phone/pda bluetooth mesh network/file sharing for an university 
lecture, but discovered that most cell phones and bluetooth devices have 
a very limited number of simultaneous bluetooth connections, due to 
frequency hopping schemes. depending on the phone modell and bluetooth 
mode you can also end up with just one connection.
finally we had to make our demonstration in an simulator.

but new cellphones are also available with wifi - has somone tried 
porting olsr or another mesh protocol to symbian?

adrian

> Alternatively, if the software can be ported to Symbian/ME, perhaps 
> standalone cellphones can themselves be tweaked to act as mesh nodes. 
> Has any work been done in this area? Do the energy requirements make 
> this impractical?
Sascha Meinrath | 22 Apr 20:44 2008
Picon

Announcing ISC4WN Opening Plenary Speakers

Hi everyone,

The International Summit for Community Wireless Networks (IS4CWN) is shaping up 
to be a great event.  We've received confirmation on our opening keynote 
speakers and I thought they might interest folks.

--Sascha

***

IS4CWN is pleased to announce our opening plenary session will feature
Amir A. Dossal, Executive Director of the UN Fund for International
Partnerships and Agnes Callamard, Executive Director of Article 19.

Amir A. Dossal, guides the development of strategic alliances for the
United Nations with corporations, foundations and philanthropists aimed
at achieving the Millennium Development Goals.  He also oversees the
management of the UN Democracy Fund (www.un.org/democracyfund) which
aims to strengthen democratic institutions and enhance democratic
governance in new or restored democracies.  Amir has developed numerous
partnerships for the United Nations, including with the Commonwealth
Business Council, the European Foundation Centre, Google.org, the LTB
Foundation, the Synergos Institute, the US Chamber of Commerce, and
others. He has also spearheaded the UN's engagement in new areas
including the technology sector working with Cisco Systems, Ericsson,
Microsoft and Vodafone.

Dr. Agnès Callamard is the executive director of ARTICLE XIX, an
international human rights organization specializing on freedom of
expression and freedom of information. Agnès Callamard has evolved a
distinguished career in human rights and humanitarian work. She is a
former Chef de Cabinet for the Secretary General of Amnesty
International, and as the organization’s Research Policy Coordinator,
she led Amnesty’s work on women’s human rights. Agnès has conducted
human rights investigations, including on violence against women, in a
large number of countries in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. She has
founded and led HAP International (the Humanitarian Accountability
Partnership) where she oversaw field trials in Afghanistan, Cambodia and
Sierra Leone and created the first international self-regulatory body
for humanitarian agencies committed to strengthening accountability to
disaster-affected populations

More information at: www.wirelesssummit.org

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wsfii-discuss <at> lists.okfn.org
http://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/wsfii-discuss
Rufus Pollock | 23 Apr 17:51 2008

Re: Wsfii site

On 06/04/08 06:37, Vickram Crishna wrote:
> I was under the impression that the site was up at okfn, and remember 

Just to add Bjarke's clarification. The site was hosted on the OKFN 
servers (though the domain+DNS for wsfii was never under OKFN control). 
About a year ago the site moved off the servers to be hosted by DIIRWEB 
which is where they still live I believe.

Regards,

Rufus

Gmane