Jeff Hine | 1 Jan 15:15 2009

Re: they didnt end the Stone Age because they ran out of stones

Wow, you are an energetic soul! Good luck to all your work, we need you. 
-Jeff

Nicholas Roberts wrote:
> hi all
>
> below are some notes, on some big, long-term projects, that I am going
> to focus on over the next few years... ...  I am especially focussing
> on where I perceive gaps in the permaculture community worldwide, the
> global problems that we face, and areas that I think I have expertise
> and interest
>
> I am heading to Robyn's Nimbin early in January and will be using the
> library there and consulting Robyn and other permaculturalists
> regarding a collection of project ideas.. perhaps also spending time
> with Jude and Michel at Seedsavers...
>
> the projects below...
>
> 1. Permaculture.Tv - a web video editorial, educational and marketing
> website - a prototype was online, but its been down for a week - I ran
> out of money - and hope to get in online ASAP... this project ran for
> about a month and was generally well received... have interest from
> Chile, USA, Australia, Africa, to continue this.. participate etc
>
> 2. Permaculture Cooperative - a global permaculture cooperative for
> all producers and workers doing permaculture.. Permaculture.TV will be
> a cooperative project.. and it seems that a unified marketing project
> for permaculturealists producers, educators, workers, designers; the
> entire spectrum of permaculture producers could greatly benefit from a
(Continue reading)

Lawrence F. London, Jr. | 1 Jan 21:09 2009
Picon

they didnt end the Stone Age because they ran out of stones & Useful software for web users

=http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/2008-December/032490.html
=[permaculture] they didnt end the Stone Age because they ran out of stones
=Nicholas Roberts nicholas at themediasociety.org
=Sat Dec 27 19:11:19 EST 2008

=below are some notes, on some big, long-term projects, that I am going
=to focus on over the next few years... ...  I am especially focussing
=on where I perceive gaps in the permaculture community worldwide, the
=global problems that we face, and areas that I think I have expertise
=and interest

=2. Permaculture Cooperative - a global permaculture cooperative for
=all producers and workers doing permaculture.. Permaculture.TV will be
=a cooperative project.. and it seems that a unified marketing project
=for permaculturealists producers, educators, workers, designers; the
=entire spectrum of permaculture producers could greatly benefit from a
=global cooperative... start to compete against the global
=multinational corporations.. I had some inetrest from Sweden, NYC and
=San Francisco regarding this.. I would suggest that the main activites
=of the Permaculture cooperative be marketing *online via an ecommerce
=website*, the Permaculture.TV video website. Also education, activism,
=lobbying and research and development project streams be developed

=3. Permaculture Workers Cooperative - a workers coop that does
=permaculture farming and work of various kinds... decentralised urban
=farming, permablitzes/permabees, permaculture maintainence etc ...
=this is Tom's social and economic justice permaculture

All of the above. I support this & will help any way I can.

(Continue reading)

SArjuna | 2 Jan 03:04 2009
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Resource request re helping SW Indian groups


     I'm looking for materials to share with groups like the Southwest Indian 
Foundation, that will show them what can be done in their area so that 
poverty-stricken native Americans can grow food, stay warm/cool, etc.    The 
donation base of groups helping the Native Americans survive at subsistence level is 
going to be evaporating, I'm thinking, and they need to get to work ASAP to 
become way more self-sustaining.

     Thanks,
     Shivani in WI

..

**************
New year...new news.  Be the first to know what is making 
headlines. (http://www.aol.com/?ncid=emlcntaolcom00000026)
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Dion Puzon Jr | 2 Jan 03:54 2009

Re: they didnt end the Stone Age because they ran out of stones & Useful software for web users

Lawrence,

Good to talk with you my friend. I will help you with this project.  
Tell me what I can do. Let's talk soon old friend.

Dion

Dion Puzon Jr
CTO/Publisher

UniMinds Media
32647 US Hwy 14
Lone Rock, WI 53556

dionp@...
www.uniminds.com
608.695.5857

On Jan 1, 2009, at 2:09 PM, "Lawrence F. London, Jr."  
<lflj@...> wrote:

> =http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/2008-December/032490.html
> =[permaculture] they didnt end the Stone Age because they ran out of  
> stones
> =Nicholas Roberts nicholas at themediasociety.org
> =Sat Dec 27 19:11:19 EST 2008
>
>
> =below are some notes, on some big, long-term projects, that I am  
> going
(Continue reading)

Darren Doherty | 2 Jan 06:28 2009

Australia Felix Permaculture Schedule 2009

G'day,

Please find following a schedule of courses and events we will be involved
with in 2009:

January/February 2009 - 14 day Ryde TAFE PDC with Penny Pyett, John
Champagne & Darren Doherty - Sydney, NSW, AU - www.permaculture.biz

February 2009 - 14 day Rainbow Valley Farm PDC with Darren Doherty, Trish
Allen, Graeme North & friends - Matakana, NZ - www.rainbowvalleyfarm.co.nzor
www.permaculture.biz (BOOKED OUT)

February 2009 - 3 day Carbon Farming Course with Darren Doherty - Mangarara
Station, Elsthorpe (Hawkes Bay), NZ - www.thefamilyfarm.net.nz or
www.permaculture.biz

March 2009 - 14 day Free Range Permaculture PDC with Darren Doherty -
Cairns, QLD, AU - www.freerangepermaculture.com.au

March 2009 - 3 day Free Range Permaculture Keyline Design Course with Darren
Doherty - Cairns, QLD, AU - www.freerangepermaculture.com.au

May 2009 - 20 day Carbon Farming Course with Kirk Gadzia, Abe Collins,
Darren Doherty, Brad Lancaster - Columbus, NM, USA - www.seqC.biz

June 2009 - 14 day Regenerative Design Institute PDC with Penny Livingston,
Darren Doherty, Robyn Francis & friends - Bolinas, CA, USA -
www.regenerativedesign.org

June 2009 - 14 day University of South Dakota PDC with Darren Doherty -
(Continue reading)

Lawrence F. London, Jr. | 2 Jan 11:19 2009
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Study: Diamonds link comet to mammal extinction - CNN.com

Study: Diamonds link comet to mammal extinction
http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/science/01/02/comet.diamonds/index.html
  (CNN) -- Tiny diamonds found in the soil are "strong evidence" a comet exploded on or above North America
nearly 
13,000 years ago, leading to the extinction of dozens of mammal species, according to a study.
Diamonds found in North American soil suggest a comet led to the extinction of dozens of mammal species.

Diamonds found in North American soil suggest a comet led to the extinction of dozens of mammal species.

The scientific report also suggests the cataclysm also reduced the population of the earliest people to
inhabit the 
region and triggered a 1,300-year-long cold spell that stretched around the world.

The heat generated by the extraterrestrial impact likely melted much of a glacier that once covered the
Great Lakes 
region, sending a massive flood down the Mississippi River, the study said.

According to the report, the cold waves of glacial runoff into the Gulf of Mexico shifted Atlantic Ocean
currents, 
changing climate patterns throughout the world in a cooling period known as the Younger Dryas.

"A rare swarm" of comets rained over North America about 12,900 years ago, sparking fires that produced
choking, leading 
"to the extinction of a large range of animals, including mammoths, across North America," the report said.

The study was conducted by a group of eight archaeologists and geologists from the universities of Oregon
and 
California, Northern Arizona University, Oklahoma University and DePaul University. Their findings
were published Friday 
in the journal Nature.
(Continue reading)

Dick Pierce | 2 Jan 18:46 2009
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Re: Resource request re helping SW Indian groups

Shavani, I would be happy to share more with you as your groups, geography,
and specific needs develop. For openers I would recommend contacting Clayton
Brascoupe, Tuscarora, of the Tesuque Pueblo outside of Santa Fe. He has run
the Traditional Native American Farmers Association for the SW for many
years. Their orientation and programs are refered to as American Indian
Permaculture - they were having 1-2 PDC classes per year at a selected
Pueblo - free to American Indians, a fee for others. Scott Pittman and
several of the Santa Fe PC folks have been involved. TNAFA is in place and
working - they always need help and support to expand their efforts.

Please let me know (dickpiercedesigns@...) more of your specific
plans, tribes, locations. I worked with the American Indian Science &
Engineering Society several years ago - one of my projects was Traditional
Agriculture, in several regions around the country. Many of my contacts are
still alive and several of the projects are flourishing.

Traditional Agriculture is a worthy cause, and a near prefect match with
Permaculture. Thanks for doing what you are doing.

Dick Pierce

On Thu, Jan 1, 2009 at 8:04 PM, <SArjuna@...> wrote:

>
>     I'm looking for materials to share with groups like the Southwest
> Indian
> Foundation, that will show them what can be done in their area so that
> poverty-stricken native Americans can grow food, stay warm/cool, etc.
>  The
> donation base of groups helping the Native Americans survive at subsistence
(Continue reading)

Louis G. Laframboise | 2 Jan 20:42 2009
Picon

Indoor Design in Cold Climates

Could anyone suggest design principles or provide bibliographic info
on the subject of plants and water as being indoor climate regulators
in cold climate. Such as their value as a heat sink. And about any
other life-based processes, such as thermophylic composting, that
could be linked in to the heat envelope of the house.

Any idea on an update to the publishing of Mollison's book on cold climates?

Cheers,
Louis
Ottawa, Canada
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ed sarten | 2 Jan 21:21 2009
Picon

Re: Indoor Design in Cold Climates

cold climate housing research at University Alaska Fairbanks might have your answers and the green house
project in Inuvik NWT may also.

--- On Fri, 1/2/09, Louis G. Laframboise <esiobmarfal@...> wrote:
From: Louis G. Laframboise <esiobmarfal@...>
Subject: [permaculture] Indoor Design in Cold Climates
To: permaculture@...
Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 10:42 AM

Could anyone suggest design principles or provide bibliographic info
on the subject of plants and water as being indoor climate regulators
in cold climate. Such as their value as a heat sink. And about any
other life-based processes, such as thermophylic composting, that
could be linked in to the heat envelope of the house.

Any idea on an update to the publishing of Mollison's book on cold
climates?

Cheers,
Louis
Ottawa, Canada
_______________________________________________
permaculture mailing list
permaculture@...
Subscribe or unsubscribe here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
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site:http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture searchstring

      
(Continue reading)

Nicholas Roberts | 3 Jan 00:18 2009

Are 'Hail Mary' Technological Solutions Our Only Hope to Prevent Disastrous Climate Change?

Are 'Hail Mary' Technological Solutions Our Only Hope to Prevent
Disastrous Climate Change?
By Steve Connor, Independent UK
Posted on January 2, 2009, Printed on January 2, 2009
http://www.alternet.org/story/116743/

An emergency "Plan B" using the latest technology is needed to save
the world from dangerous climate change, according to a poll of
leading scientists carried out by The Independent. The collective
international failure to curb the growing emissions of carbon dioxide
(CO2) in the atmosphere has meant that an alternative to merely
curbing emissions may become necessary.

The plan would involve highly controversial proposals to lower global
temperatures artificially through daringly ambitious schemes that
either reduce sunlight levels by man-made means or take CO2 out of the
air. This "geoengineering" approach -- including schemes such as
fertilising the oceans with iron to stimulate algal blooms -- would
have been dismissed as a distraction a few years ago but is now being
seen by the majority of scientists we surveyed as a viable emergency
backup plan that could save the planet from the worst effects of
climate change, at least until deep cuts are made in CO2 emissions.

What has worried many of the experts, who include recognised
authorities from the world's leading universities and research
institutes, as well as a Nobel Laureate, is the failure to curb global
greenhouse gas emissions through international agreements, namely the
Kyoto Treaty, and recent studies indicating that the Earth's natural
carbon "sinks" are becoming less efficient at absorbing man-made CO2
from the atmosphere.
(Continue reading)


Gmane