Bill McDorman | 1 Nov 01:59 2005

Re: Designers for extreme cold?

Michael and Vint:

I have been searching for, testing, growing and selling non-hybrid seeds for
the coldest, short-season climates for 25 years.  I grew up at 6,000 feet in
the mountains of central Idaho and started a seed company to supply the
needs of those like myself largely ignored by industrial agriculture.

"High Altitude Gardens" was started in 1984.  (Before that, I helped start
Garden City Seeds in Western Montana in 1979.)  The first 10 years,
approximately 40% of the open-pollinated vegetable, wildflower and native
grass seeds found in the catalog changed from year to year as we discovered
better varieties from around the world.

We formed a small family corporation in 1990 and named it "Seeds Trust" to
encourage folks from other cold climates to take a look at our stuff even if
they didn't live at altitude.  We printed catalogs for 18 years and still
sell seeds under both names.

How cold?  One summer in our trial gardens we had 9 frosts and 2 hail storms
between Memorial Day and Labor Day.

You can find our list of 200 vegetables, 100 wildflowers, 15 herbs and 25
native grasses at:  http://www.seedstrust.com

I write this not because I want you to buy something from our humble
operation.  I write it because the list embodies the collective intelligence
22 years testing at 6,000 feet and feedback from tens of thousands of
customers from cold places all over the world trying to solve the cold
climate garden puzzle.  It is one of a number of good places to start.  And
of course, we are still learning.
(Continue reading)

L.Santoyo Designs | 1 Nov 02:30 2005

Useful Species List for Cold Climates Re: Bliss, Idaho Design Course April 16-29, 06 Re: Designers for extreme cold?

Recommended Useful Species List for Cold Climates
By Larry Santoyo, EarthFlow Design Works

Nitrogen-fixing Plants
Alnus sp. -Alder
Caragana arborescens -Siberian Pea Shrub
Ceanothus sp. -Ceanothus
Elaeagnus commutata -Silverberry
Elaeagnus angustifolia -Russian Olive
Elaeagnus umbellata -Cardinal Autum Olive
Trifolium sp. -clover
Gymnocladus diocus -Kentucky Coffee Tree
Vicia sp. -vetch
Shepardia argentea -Silver Buffaloberry
Medicago sativa  -alfalfa
Shepardia canadensis -Russet Buffaloberry

Agro-forestry plants
Vaccinium sp. -Ornablue Blueberry
Vaccinium corymbasum -Patriot Blueberry
Rubus sp.  -Boyne Raspberry
Rubus sp.  -Amity Raspberry
Rubus occidentalis -Munger Black Raspberry
Viburnum trilobum -American Cranberry
Viburnum dentatum -Arrowwood
Viburnum lentago -Nannyberry
Corylus sp. -Hazelbert
Corylus sp. -Bill's Hybrid Trazel
Corylus sp. -Gellatly Filazel
Corylus sp. -Peace River Cross
(Continue reading)

Jara | 1 Nov 09:19 2005
Picon

Nature vs Human Design

While reading this beautifully expressed article and well thought out design 
experiment I could not help but think why these people don't enlist the help 
of nature. The energy, thought and effort that has obviously gone into this 
is immense and in my humble view completely needless. Why not simply 
broadcast super biodiverse (100 + indiginous species of trees, shrubs, 
canes, berries, herbs, annuals, perennials etc etc etc) Fukuokian seedballs 
the size of golf balls made with rockdust, inoculant and kaolin. Then chuck 
a thin layer(1-2cm) of straw mulch, rockdust and compost on top of that and 
let nature get on with it. Having done this I can vouch for the efficacy of 
the whole thing and the minimal labour, effort input.

Of course it is a bit difficult to flog seminars and patent a process where 
nature is doing all the design and work but are we interested in making a 
killing or in permanent culture.

Andrew.

> WOOSTER, Ohio ? Carefully designed polyculture systems, grown on small
> farms or even in suburban yards, could self-limit pest problems and
> gross up to $90,000 per acre, says Joe Kovach, head of Ohio State
> University?s Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program.
>
> Together with Loren Harper and Rosa Raudales, both also of the program,
> Kovach has planned and planted four different polyculture systems, or
> ?modular ecological designs,? each combining the same wide mix of
> high-value fruits and vegetables, annuals and perennials, tall crops and
> short ones, into 45-by-60-foot plots.
>
> The goal: To see which system works best based on yield, economics and
> pest reduction ? and to make, by selling retail, $10 per linear foot, or
(Continue reading)

Jennifer Fairley | 1 Nov 13:50 2005

Re: Nature vs Human Design

Andrew.
Like your thought and I am interested in your way of seeding an area.  I
do not know about seedballs.  Could you point me to information?  I have 3
acres I wish to plant - was a gravel pit about 30 years ago...one area
will always stay 'natural'--nothing there but the gravel they did not take
-- but the other land minimally disturbed would benefit from a boost from
man and let nature do the rest.
THANKS
Jennifer Fairley
“Washing one's hands of the conflict between the powerful and the
powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral.”
Paulo Freire, Educator

On Tue, November 1, 2005 3:19 am, Jara wrote:
While reading this beautifully expressed article and well thought out
design
experiment I could not help but think why these people don't enlist the
help
of nature. The energy, thought and effort that has obviously gone into
this
is immense and in my humble view completely needless. Why not simply
broadcast super biodiverse (100 + indiginous species of trees, shrubs,
canes, berries, herbs, annuals, perennials etc etc etc) Fukuokian
seedballs
the size of golf balls made with rockdust, inoculant and kaolin. Then
chuck
a thin layer(1-2cm) of straw mulch, rockdust and compost on top of that
and
let nature get on with it. Having done this I can vouch for the efficacy
of
(Continue reading)

Greg | 1 Nov 15:27 2005

Wallmart the Movie

Hey all,

Check out this movie

http://www.walmartmovie.com/

Everyone has seen Wal-Mart's lavish television commercials, but have 
you ever wondered why Wal-Mart spends so much money trying to 
convince you it cares about your family, your community, and even its 
own employees? What is it hiding?

  WAL-MART: The High Cost of Low Price takes you behind the glitz and 
into the real lives of workers and their families, business owners 
and their communities, in an extraordinary journey that will 
challenge the way you think, feel... and shop.
--

-- 

The Urban Farm
Growing good food
Having fun gardening
Connecting with nature

Greg Peterson
http://www.urbanfarm.org
602/565-7045

UPDATED PR Booksigning EcoNest: Creating Sustainable Sanctuaries of Clay, Straw, and Timber Nov 1-22 2005 Arizona/California

Contact: Margie Bushman
Santa Barbara Permaculture Network
(805) 962-2571, email: margie@...

SANTA BARBARA PERMACULTURE NETWORK
Presents:
EcoNest: Creating Sustainable Sanctuaries
of Clay, Straw, and Timber Book Tour Arizona and California   Nov 1-22 2005

Slide Show & Booksigning with
Robert LaPorte & Paula Baker-LaPorte

A bird builds its nest using the materials at hand to create a perfect
shelter for its bio-region. It doesn't fly to the next state for twigs nor
does it build a home that is bigger than it needs. Instinctively it creates
an environment that is nurturing, nontoxic, creating no waste and neither
borrowing nor stealing resources from future generations. These exemplary
owner/builders know how to build and repair their own shelters. When they
have no more use for their nests, the building materials decompose,
becoming fertile ground for nature's regenerative miracle. This is natural
building and the authors' inspiration for their newly published book,
EcoNests: Creating Sustainable Sanctuaries of Clay, Straw, and Timber.

EcoNests are simple, elegant, and healthful handcrafted dwellings that
welcome owner participation in their construction. They utilize natural
building techniques including timber framing, clay/straw walls, earth
plastering, and natural, non-toxic finishes. An EcoNest is built to last
for centuries, serving many generations, and is designed to work in harmony
with its natural surroundings. Mindful siting, reverence for what is
present in the nature of the site, roof water collection, alternatives for
(Continue reading)

Lawrence F. London, Jr. | 1 Nov 17:00 2005
Picon

Organic foods under attack

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: 	[SANET-MG] Fwd: organic foods under attack
Date: 	Tue, 1 Nov 2005 07:45:36 -0500
From: 	Hugh Joseph <hugh.joseph@...>
To: 	SANET-MG@...

I found the following info on the organic consumers website. I though
you would find it interesting.

Roman

Despite receiving over 350,000 letters and phone calls from OCA members
and the organic community, Republican leaders in Congress October 27
attached a rider to the 2006 Agricultural Appropriations Bill to weaken
the nation's organic food standards in response to pressure from
large-scale food manufacturers. "Congress voted last night to weaken the
national organic standards that consumers count on to preserve the
integrity of the organic label," said Ronnie Cummins, National Director
of the Organic Consumers Association. "The process was profoundly
undemocratic and the end result is a serious setback for the multi
billion dollar alternative food and farming system that the organic
community has so painstakingly built up over the past 35 years. As
passed, the amendment sponsored by the Organic Trade Association allows:
Numerous synthetic food additives and processing aids, including over
500 food contact substances, to be used in organic foods without public
review. Young dairy cows to continue to be treated with antibiotics and
fed genetically engineered feed prior to being converted to organic
production. Loopholes under which non-organic ingredients could be
substituted for organic ingredients without any notification of the
public based on "emergency decrees."
(Continue reading)

Michelle Maggiore | 1 Nov 17:12 2005
Picon

Green Building workshop/tour in Virginia

 Hello All, 
I just wanted to pass along  this information for anyone that may be in the bearby area this upcming weekend:
Green Building Focus of Seminar and Tour 

A seminar and tour of homes and buildings in the Charlottesville area will highlight a wide range of
environmentally sound green building practices. "Building Green: Practical steps for Eco-friendly
Residential Design and Construction" will be held on Saturday, November 5 th, beginning at 10:00 am at the
Charlottesville Albemarle Visitors Center on the downtown mall. The tour was organized by Appalachian
Sustainable Development and is being co-sponsored by The Ceiling and Floor Shop, The Gentle Gardener,
Lithic Construction, Nature Neutral, LLC, and Sunbiosis, PLC. The cost is $10 per person, $15 per couple.
Home owners, contractors and architects are all encouraged to attend. For more information contact Eric
Gilchrist at (434) 977-0934 or ericg@...

SUSTAINABLE SCOTTSVILLE
Creating sustainable options right here at home:
http://home.mindspring.com/~mmaggior
Don | 1 Nov 19:49 2005

Re: Nature vs Human Design

Perfect strategy for Zone 5 rehab...I love it. Thanks for the recipe!

Don

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Jara" <jara@...>
To: <permaculture@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 1:19 AM
Subject: [permaculture] Nature vs Human Design

> While reading this beautifully expressed article and well thought out 
> design
> experiment I could not help but think why these people don't enlist the 
> help
> of nature. The energy, thought and effort that has obviously gone into 
> this
> is immense and in my humble view completely needless. Why not simply
> broadcast super biodiverse (100 + indiginous species of trees, shrubs,
> canes, berries, herbs, annuals, perennials etc etc etc) Fukuokian 
> seedballs
> the size of golf balls made with rockdust, inoculant and kaolin. Then 
> chuck
> a thin layer(1-2cm) of straw mulch, rockdust and compost on top of that 
> and
> let nature get on with it. Having done this I can vouch for the efficacy 
> of
> the whole thing and the minimal labour, effort input.
>
> Of course it is a bit difficult to flog seminars and patent a process 
> where
(Continue reading)

Toby Hemenway | 1 Nov 20:31 2005

Re: Nature vs Human Design

On 11/1/05 12:19 AM, "Jara" <jara@...> wrote:

> Why not simply 
> broadcast super biodiverse (100 + indiginous species of trees, shrubs,
> canes, berries, herbs, annuals, perennials etc etc etc) Fukuokian seedballs
[snip]
> Having done this I can vouch for the efficacy of
>the whole thing

I am very interested in hearing more about your experience with broadcasting
over 100 species of native trees, shrubs, canes, and herbs in seedballs. I
would expect germination rates for native trees and shrubs in particular to
be so low as to make this unworkable; I would also expect the herbs and
canes to completely choke out the tender, slow-growing tree seedlings before
they could be established.

Or did I misunderstand the quote and you have worked with seedballs--which
are great--but not in the way you suggest? I don't think that idea will work
for the above reasons and a few more. The article that was cited described
an attempt to create crop-producing polycultures, not native assemblages.
It's conceivable that broadcast-seeding just the right natives (adapted to
specific soil, aspect, etc) would work since these are species that have
seen each other before and thus might, if properly chosen, be able to
partition resources among themselves without killing each other or
succumbing to deficiencies or pests. But it's rare that so many natives get
seeded at the same time in nature, hence I suspect the broadcast technique
is not actually mimicking nature at all! And if you're working with a
food-based polyculture with species from many regions, you're going to have
to do some selecting and nurturing and tweaking, not to mention successional
planting and replanting, to make sure all the pieces survive and can work
(Continue reading)


Gmane