Jerome Osentowski | 1 Feb 02:41 2004

Re: connections for Planetary Pc Directory

check us out at crmpi.org.   jerome
--
Jerome Osentowski, Director
Central Rocky Mountain Permaculture Institute
PO Box 631
Basalt, CO 81621   U.S.A.

Tel/fax (970) 927-4158    E mail: jerome@...

For more information, please visit our web site at <<www.crmpi.org>>

----------
>From: Keith Johnson <keithdj@...>
>To: webmaster@..., permaculture
<permaculture@...>
>Subject: Re: [permaculture] connections for Planetary Pc Directory
>Date: Sat, Jan 31, 2004, 2:23 PM
>

> Gary,
> Absolutely. I need contacts everywhere. The list of states I provided
> were just the ones for which I had NO contact data. By all means send me
> your contact data wherever you are. Its a lonely world for some
> permaculturists, but it may simply be because people don't know where to
> find them.
> Keith
>
> Gary Deetz wrote:
>
> Any calls for Permaculturists in Colorado?
(Continue reading)

E.Christopher Mare | 1 Feb 19:38 2004

Permaculture Design Course

ALOHA `AINA
PERMACULTURE DESIGN COURSE

November 20 - December 4, 2004

Held at Pangaia 
Pahoa, Puna District
Hawai`i

A two-week 
Permaculture Design Course focused on Earth-Healing and Island
Self-Reliance. 

Every permaculture course teaches how to design productive and beautiful
yards, farms and properties. This course also has a major component on how
to help restore degraded ecosystems in cities, agricultural areas,
overgrazed, polluted and disturbed environments. You will learn how to
help enhance and speed up Nature's natural recovery processes. 
	 
Instructed by: 
Michael Pilarski ,Friends of the Trees Society.
Bruce Hill, Kanahena Farm & Nursery
Manis Martin, Boaz Martin, Moke Kim & other guest speakers.

Course tuition, early registration: $1,000. $250 deposit holds your place
($100 non-refundable). 
Send check made out to Pangaia to their address.
For further information contact:

Manis Martin, Pangaia
(Continue reading)

Andrew Clements | 2 Feb 19:28 2004
Picon

Soapstone and other ideas for keeping warm in Greece

Dear All ,

    Thank you once again for all your helpful advice about keeping warm in
Greece . I have researched all your ideas and think that soapstone sounds to
be a good start . I have looked all over the internet at soapstone stoves ,
fireplaces , slabs etc and it looks to be absolutely fabulous but bloody
steep and only available in Finland , Canada and the USA . Does anyone know
of a supplier of reasonably priced soapstone in Greece so that I can build
my over DIY fireplace/stove ?

Thanks ,

Andrew.
Toby Hemenway | 2 Feb 19:19 2004

Re: Pattern magic: Ekman spirals from space

A bit of nomenclatural clarity:  The phenomenon that Mollison in the 
Designer's Manual calls an Ekman spiral, the spiraling of wind when it 
hits a barrier, is not an Ekman spiral. I have not been able to find a 
name for that effect.

  Ekman spirals refer very specifically to an effect of the Coriolis 
force on ocean currents. Wind and the earth's spin cause ocean currents 
to be displaced in a downward clockwise spiral (in the Northern 
Hemisphere; counter-clockwise down under). Refs at
http://www.gfdl.gov/~a1g/Ekman_spiral.html
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~aecl410/wavecurr/sld004.htm
or just Google "ekman spiral"

Nice patterns, Loren. Ripples, some shear from two moving air masses, 
and some kind of swirling wake that's on its way toward being a von 
Karman vortex street.

Toby
http://www.patternliteracy.com

On Friday, January 30, 2004, at 08:50 AM, Loren Davidson wrote:

> I just saw this fascinating picture on Space.com:
>
> http://www.space.com/imageoftheday/image_of_day_040130.html
>
> Happy Friday,
>
> Loren
>
(Continue reading)

Lawrence F. London, Jr. | 2 Feb 23:57 2004
Picon

Re: Pattern magic: Ekman spirals from space

Toby Hemenway wrote:

>  Ekman spirals refer very specifically to an effect of the Coriolis 
> force on ocean currents. Wind and the earth's spin cause ocean currents 
> to be displaced in a downward clockwise spiral (in the Northern 
> Hemisphere; counter-clockwise down under). Refs at

Isn't this phenomenon supposed to be partially responsible for the El Nino effect?

> http://www.gfdl.gov/~a1g/Ekman_spiral.html
> http://www.public.iastate.edu/~aecl410/wavecurr/sld004.htm
> or just Google "ekman spiral"

--

-- 
L.F.London
lfl@...
http://market-farming.com
http://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech
Kelly Finigan | 2 Feb 21:41 2004
Picon

Re: Soapstone and other ideas for keeping warm in Greece

Andrew:

Since the soapstone stoves are only available (and yes, they are many $$$) 
in cold northern countries (from where most of your advice has probably come 
too ;), and since sapstone may not be locally available, I begin to wonder: 
what did people in Greece do to keep warm 50,100 or 200 years ago? Maybe 
there are some local "tried and true" solutions that use local materials?

just a thought...

Kelly

--
Kelly Finigan, M.Sc. P.Eng. Permaculture Designer
~ Sustainability consultant & ecological designer ~ 

744 - 4 Street NW
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1P2
phone 1-403-283-7270
Andrew Clements | 3 Feb 18:59 2004
Picon

Huddlin' and cuddlin' for Kelly

Dear Kelly ,

   In answer to your question - they huddled and cuddled in front of a stove
with their animals eating lashings of soup and drinking gallons of Greek
coffee and mountain tea - The men in the village cafenion and the women in
one of their friends houses with the kids ;-))

Andrew.

> Andrew:
>
> Since the soapstone stoves are only available (and yes, they are many $$$)
> in cold northern countries (from where most of your advice has probably
come
> too ;), and since sapstone may not be locally available, I begin to
wonder:
> what did people in Greece do to keep warm 50,100 or 200 years ago? Maybe
> there are some local "tried and true" solutions that use local materials?
>
> just a thought...
>
> Kelly
>
>
> --
> Kelly Finigan, M.Sc. P.Eng. Permaculture Designer
> ~ Sustainability consultant & ecological designer ~
>
> 744 - 4 Street NW
> Calgary, Alberta T2N 1P2
(Continue reading)

David Neeley | 4 Feb 01:09 2004
Picon

Re: Soapstone

Andrew,

It appears that the last commercial production of soapstone
in Greece was in 1994.

When you search for it, there are several other words to
look at, by the way: talc (since soapstone has a high talc
content, they are often found together), and steatite
(perhaps the most common form of soapstone).

Considerable production appears to be done in Italy, and
there may also be some in Bulgaria or Romania. You may have
to inquire at the stone merchants in the nearest larger
city to determine if and how you can get it.

David

__________________________________
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Lawrence F. London, Jr. | 4 Feb 08:12 2004
Picon

[FWD] Bush proposes to ax ATTRA!


 > Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2004 15:05:03 -0800
 > Reply-To: Sustainable Agriculture Network Discussion Group
 > <SANET-MG@...>
 > Sender: Sustainable Agriculture Network Discussion Group
 > <SANET-MG@...>
 > From: Jane Sooby <jane@...>
 > Subject: Bush proposes to ax ATTRA!

 > Greetings:
 > We're well past the last straw by now; however, I am discovering a
 > renewed capability of having my mind blown by the caprices of
 > politics. No doubt everyone will receive organizing e-mails etc. on
 > this issue, and the other egregious cuts in important sust/organic
 > programs proposed in the Bush budget. Aargh, I'm getting a lump in my
 > throat! How could anyone even think to X out ATTRA???
 >
 > From a press release by Teresa Opheim, Executive Director, Midwest
 > Sustainable Agriculture Working Group and National Coordinator,
 > Sustainable Ag Coalition:
 >
 > "The Presidentís budget proposes eliminating the highly-rated and
 > effective Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas or ATTRA
 > program. Currently funded at $2.5 million, the program is the major
 > source of sustainable and organic agriculture production and marketing
 > information for farmers, extension agents, and other agricultural
 > professionals. The proposed budget also would scale back funding for
 > the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program by
 > 22 percent to $13 million. The proposal would also reduce the research
 > and extension program to help farmers transition to organic
(Continue reading)

Keith Johnson | 4 Feb 05:08 2004
Picon

Re: Re: Soapstone

Soapstone is lovely to work with. I got 1/2 a ton from an old quarry in 
Virginia in Nelson county. I cut and polished it to use as heat sink 
mass around a woodstove that I sank 8  inches below floor level in our 
clay/straw (or light clay) house at Earthaven Ecovillage (the pit 
handily confines the wood and ash mess around the stove). With the 
soapstone I built a fairly massive surrounding shelf which I use for 
drying stuff. There's insulation behind it and it holds heat quite well. 
The stone is easy to work and takes a polish with finer and finer 
sanding. I finish with 3 subsequently finer wet sandings and, apply a 
simple beeswax and linseed oil blend to give it a rich gloss and bring 
out the complex deep colors.
On sunny days no wood heat is required as the solar gain is quite 
sufficient. As long as I close the insulated drapes, the solar heat 
keeps me warm through the night and into the next day. I can go a long 
time without burning wood as long as the days are sunny. My 300 square 
foot, zone 7 home consumes about a third of a cord of wood per winter.
Keith

David Neeley wrote:

>Andrew,
>
>It appears that the last commercial production of soapstone
>in Greece was in 1994.
>
>When you search for it, there are several other words to
>look at, by the way: talc (since soapstone has a high talc
>content, they are often found together), and steatite
>(perhaps the most common form of soapstone).
>
(Continue reading)


Gmane