Jorgen Lundman | 1 Dec 01:26 2005
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Re: UPnP Support?


Christopher W. Richardson wrote:
> Hi,
> 	1) What sort of device do I need to get, which is
>            preferrably small (I'm not looking for a stereo
>            component, and certainly not for a PC), supports
>            802.11, has the appropriate ports to connect to (at
>            least) a stereo and ideally to video, and to which I
>            can stream such data?

Can't really help you there. I have a Buffalo Linktheater networked DVDPlayer, 
which isn't small.

> 
>         2) For what should I be searching in pkgsrc to stream to
>            whatever the answer to question #1 is?
> 

Not sure about pkgsrc. The greater community of networked DVD players seem to 
use "wizd". I wrote my own for the hell of it, called "llink". The companies 
have their own too, PCcast, etc, they are usually java and Windows only.

Now these are media streamers which have UPnP discovery in them, but they are 
probably not 100% UPnP? I don't mind adding code if there are bits missing to be 
fully compliant.

Lund

--

-- 
Jorgen Lundman       | <lundman <at> lundman.net>
(Continue reading)

Louis Guillaume | 1 Dec 04:44 2005

netbsd-3 panics

This has been happening for a while now. Haven't been able to get a dump 
because it never gets to sync properly.

uvm_fault(0xc08799c0,0,0,2)->0xe
kernel: page fault trap, code = 0
Stopped in pid 6.1 (ioflush) at netbsd:ffs_update+0x87: movl %eax,0x20(%ecx)
db{1}> t /l
ffs_update(cada7e74,10012,cada7ebc,c046595a,c064c880) at 
netbsd:ffs_update+0x87
VOP_UPDATE(cc03d9dc,0,0,0,0)at netbsd:VOP_UPDATE+0x34
ffs_sync(c0e23000,3,ca4c0000,ca4c27f8,12) at netbsd:ffs_sync+0x314
sync_fsync(cada7f14,cada7f3c,c03f7180,c064c1c0) at netbsd:sync_fsync+0xc5
VOP_FSYNC(cb304ddc,ca4c0000,8,0,0)at netbsd:VOP_FSYNC+0x4c
sched_sync(ca46294,94a000,953000,0,c0100321) at netbsd:sched_sync+0x1e8
db{1}> reboot
syncing disks... panic lockmgr: locking against myself
Stopped at pid 6.1 (ioflush) at netbsd:cpu_Debugger+0x4:    leave
db{1}> reboot
rebooting...

####### dmesg ########

NetBSD 3.0_RC3 (GENERIC.MP) #0: Thu Nov 24 05:35:06 UTC 2005

builds <at> works.netbsd.org:/home/builds/ab/netbsd-3-0-RC3/i386/200511230244Z-obj/home/builds/ab/netbsd-3-0-RC3/src/sys/arch/i386/compile/GENERIC.MP
total memory = 127 MB
avail memory = 116 MB
BIOS32 rev. 0 found at 0xfd7e2
mainbus0 (root)
mainbus0: Intel MP Specification (Version 1.1) (INTEL    440FX       )
(Continue reading)

Stephen Borrill | 1 Dec 08:51 2005
Picon

Re: UPnP Support?

On Thu, 1 Dec 2005, Jorgen Lundman wrote:
> Christopher W. Richardson wrote:
>> Hi,
>> 	1) What sort of device do I need to get, which is
>>            preferrably small (I'm not looking for a stereo
>>            component, and certainly not for a PC), supports
>>            802.11, has the appropriate ports to connect to (at
>>            least) a stereo and ideally to video, and to which I
>>            can stream such data?
>
> Can't really help you there. I have a Buffalo Linktheater networked 
> DVDPlayer, which isn't small.

Net necessary exactly what you want, but there's probably some mileage in 
looking at an embedded device running vlc. Get a micro ATX board and run 
NetBSD from flash. Get multimedia/vlc and run it with vlc -f udp://. It'll 
then just sit there waiting for data to be sent to it. For further 
excitement it has a telnet interface which you can use for remote control.

>>         2) For what should I be searching in pkgsrc to stream to
>>            whatever the answer to question #1 is?
>>

multimedia/vlc again. You can stream pretty much anything at such a 
client using vlc. You can also transcode to alter bandwidth, scale, 
etc. For example (all on one line):
vlc -vvv dvdsimple:///dev/cd0a <at> 2:2 --loop --sout
"#transcode{vcodec=mp4v,scale=0.75,vb=768}:standard{access=udp,mux-ts,url=192.168.1.15}"

This will play title 2, chapter 2 of a DVD continually with a video 
(Continue reading)

Desiclub | 1 Dec 09:24 2005
Picon

Hi

Testing

Pavel Cahyna | 1 Dec 12:07 2005
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Re: netbsd-3 panics

On Wed, Nov 30, 2005 at 10:44:06PM -0500, Louis Guillaume wrote:
> This has been happening for a while now. Haven't been able to get a dump 
> because it never gets to sync properly.

reboot 0x104 does not work?

Pavel Cahyna

Matthew Braithwaite | 1 Dec 23:27 2005
Picon

[Raidframe] How to recover a degraded mirror without a spare?

After two years of solid service, a drive in my Raidframe mirror has
failed, and I'm having trouble finding information on how to recover.
The man pages talk about recovery in terms of reconstruction onto a
spare, but I don't have a spare in my dinky little 1U box.

Instead, I need to replace the failed drive, then recover the mirror.

The naive sequence of operations would be:

  1. Shutdown
  2. Replace failed drive with new blank drive
  3. Boot

But I'm not sure what I'd to to tell Raidframe that the new wd0d isn't
the wd0d that was there before.

Another worry I had about this procedure is that Raidframe might
become confused on reboot because it find a majority of its database
replicas.

So then I came up with this sequence:

  1. Remove the failed wd0d from the configuration with raidctl -c.
     (I think this would leave an intact mirror, but one with a 
     missing component?)
  2. Shutdown
  3. Replace failed drive
  4. Boot
  5. Introduce the new wd0d as a spare, and reconstruct onto it.

(Continue reading)

Daniel Cox | 2 Dec 00:12 2005
Picon

Re: [Raidframe] How to recover a degraded mirror without a spare?

You can simply replace the failed drive (there is no need to remove it first).
Put a disklabel on the new drive (not needed in your case if using wd0d)

Then:
raidctl -a /dev/wd0d raid0
raidctl -F component1 raid0
 (or component0? use raidctl -s raid0 to find out)

Daniel.

>>> Matthew Braithwaite <matt <at> braithwaite.net> 2/12/05 8:57:50 >>>
After two years of solid service, a drive in my Raidframe mirror has
failed, and I'm having trouble finding information on how to recover.
The man pages talk about recovery in terms of reconstruction onto a
spare, but I don't have a spare in my dinky little 1U box.

Instead, I need to replace the failed drive, then recover the mirror.

The naive sequence of operations would be:

  1. Shutdown
  2. Replace failed drive with new blank drive
  3. Boot

But I'm not sure what I'd to to tell Raidframe that the new wd0d isn't
the wd0d that was there before.

Another worry I had about this procedure is that Raidframe might
become confused on reboot because it find a majority of its database
replicas.
(Continue reading)

Matthew Braithwaite | 2 Dec 02:46 2005
Picon

Re: [Raidframe] How to recover a degraded mirror without a spare?

> You can simply replace the failed drive (there is no need to remove it
> first). 

When you say `replace' I am not sure whether you mean, `physically
replace', or `raidctl -F'.

The system can only accommodate two physical disks.  So I have to
remove the dead disk first, and I'd rather the system were powered off
when I did that. :-)

So I guess another way to put my question is: if I power off,
physically replace the failed disk, and restart, how will Raidframe
react to this?

I *think* what you are saying is that, whereas now I have:

  wd0d: failed
  wd1d: optimal

after restarting the machine I will have:

  component1: failed
  wd1d: optimal

and, therefore, I will be able to introduce (the new) wd0d into the
RAID without any complications.

Have I understood you correctly?

(Continue reading)

Daniel Cox | 2 Dec 05:05 2005
Picon

Re: [Raidframe] How to recover a degraded mirror without a spare?

Yes you have understood correctly.

Most of the RAID systems I have setup are mirror on 2 IDE disks.
In the few cases a disk has failed, I:
- turn the machine off (in many cases the system has frozen anyway)
- remove the old disk and put a new one in
- boot
kernel messages show which disk is being used and the missing one should become component0/1

>>> Matthew Braithwaite <matt <at> braithwaite.net> 2/12/05 12:16:07 >>>
> You can simply replace the failed drive (there is no need to remove it
> first). 

When you say `replace' I am not sure whether you mean, `physically
replace', or `raidctl -F'.

The system can only accommodate two physical disks.  So I have to
remove the dead disk first, and I'd rather the system were powered off
when I did that. :-)

So I guess another way to put my question is: if I power off,
physically replace the failed disk, and restart, how will Raidframe
react to this?

I *think* what you are saying is that, whereas now I have:

  wd0d: failed
  wd1d: optimal

after restarting the machine I will have:
(Continue reading)

Stephen Borrill | 2 Dec 10:19 2005
Picon

Re: [Raidframe] How to recover a degraded mirror without a spare?

On Thu, 1 Dec 2005, Matthew Braithwaite wrote:

>> You can simply replace the failed drive (there is no need to remove it
>> first).
>
> When you say `replace' I am not sure whether you mean, `physically
> replace', or `raidctl -F'.
>
> The system can only accommodate two physical disks.  So I have to
> remove the dead disk first, and I'd rather the system were powered off
> when I did that. :-)
>
> So I guess another way to put my question is: if I power off,
> physically replace the failed disk, and restart, how will Raidframe
> react to this?
>
> I *think* what you are saying is that, whereas now I have:
>
>  wd0d: failed
>  wd1d: optimal
>
> after restarting the machine I will have:
>
>  component1: failed
>  wd1d: optimal
>
> and, therefore, I will be able to introduce (the new) wd0d into the
> RAID without any complications.
>
> Have I understood you correctly?
(Continue reading)


Gmane