Richard M Kreuter | 1 Jun 17:30 2005
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Lost my inodes

Howdy,

Yesterday I ran out of inodes while untarring something, and after
clearing out a lot of temporary files, I noticed something fishy: the
number of files found by find and the number of used inodes reported
by df differ by a couple orders of magnitude on /home [1]:

# df -i /home
Filesystem            Inodes   IUsed   IFree IUse% Mounted on
/dev/wd0j            12671998 12542780  129218   99% /home
# pwd
/home
# find . -xdev -ls | awk ' { print $1 } ' | sort -n | uniq | wc -l
218938

I'm running NetBSD 2.0.2, and /home is normally mounted softdep,
nodev, noatime.

That's the problem.  Here's a possible explanation, but I'm not sure
if this is the cause: last week, after a crash, fsck on my /home file
system printed this message for at least a few thousand integers <N>:

ALLOCATED INODE <N> MARKED FREE

After it finished, by investigation, no files seemed to have been
lost, and I didn't have time to do look into it.  Now I can't find the
meaning of this message documented anyplace, and the code in
src/sbin/fsck_ffs/pass5.c where this message seems to originate
doesn't mean much to me.

(Continue reading)

Patrick Welche | 1 Jun 18:06 2005
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Re: executable in i386.iso /usr/local/bin which do not run

On Tue, May 31, 2005 at 07:50:21AM -0700, Simeon Nifos wrote:
> Dear users,
> I have installed netbsd on a celeron coopermine,
> successfully! Unfortunately apart from the problems
> I have with csh, I have troubles running some 
> executables I have found in /usr/local/bin.
> for instance:
> 
> #emacs
> 
> wrong architecture: executable emacs cannot be
> executed.

What does "file /usr/local/bin/emacs" have to say?

Cheers,

Patrick

Steven M. Bellovin | 1 Jun 20:55 2005

device hangs with 4-port Ethernet board

I have a 4-port Ethernet board on a 2.0 machine.  Here's the dmesg 
output for it (I think this is everything relevant).

ppb1 at pci0 dev 9 function 0: Digital Equipment DECchip 21152 PCI-PCI Bridge (rev. 0x03)
pci2 at ppb1 bus 2
pci2: i/o space, memory space enabled, rd/line, wr/inv ok
fxp0 at pci2 dev 4 function 0: i82559S Ethernet, rev 9
fxp0: interrupting at irq 3
fxp0: Ethernet address 00:20:fc:1e:67:40
inphy0 at fxp0 phy 1: i82555 10/100 media interface, rev. 4
inphy0: 10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, auto
fxp1 at pci2 dev 5 function 0: i82559S Ethernet, rev 9
fxp1: interrupting at irq 5
fxp1: Ethernet address 00:20:fc:1e:67:41
inphy1 at fxp1 phy 1: i82555 10/100 media interface, rev. 4
inphy1: 10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, auto
fxp2 at pci2 dev 6 function 0: i82559S Ethernet, rev 9
fxp2: interrupting at irq 10
fxp2: Ethernet address 00:20:fc:1e:67:42
inphy2 at fxp2 phy 1: i82555 10/100 media interface, rev. 4
inphy2: 10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, auto
fxp3 at pci2 dev 7 function 0: i82559S Ethernet, rev 9
fxp3: interrupting at irq 11
fxp3: Ethernet address 00:20:fc:1e:67:43
inphy3 at fxp3 phy 1: i82555 10/100 media interface, rev. 4
inphy3: 10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, auto

However, when I use more than one interface on that card, the interface 
hangs.  For a while, I thought the problem was the switch, since 
power-cycling the switch cleared things up.  Since I switched to using 
(Continue reading)

Malcolm Herbert | 2 Jun 04:44 2005
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using netbsd to audit machines?

Had a request on another list for a floppy image which would do an audit
of the hardware inside a PC and do some simplistic testing to see what 
works and what doesn't ... was thinking that for the audit part at least
the kernel boot messages would be incredibly useful and for testing
something like dd and dhclient and some other small network testing tools
could also be useful ... being able to dump all this information out the
serial port or the network (if working) would also be extremely useful.

not all that hard to do, but have there been similar moves in the past
I could base stuff on?

--

-- 
Malcolm Herbert                                    System Administrator
ph [990] 54881 rm 28-241                          School of GeoSciences

Manuel Bouyer | 2 Jun 11:51 2005

what is a serial BREAK ?

Hi,
not strictly NetBSD-related (although my primary concern is to be able
to enter NetBSD's ddb from the system I'm designing :) but I know there are
some knowlegeable peoples here.

What is, from an electrical POW, a BREAK on a serial line ?
A long period at high voltage level, a long period at the low voltage
level, or a long period at ground ?

I plan to use a MAX232 to convert the TTL signal to RS232 levels,
and I don't know if I can generate a BREAK by driving the
MAX232 input, or if I need some extra circuitery.

--

-- 
Manuel Bouyer <bouyer <at> antioche.eu.org>
     NetBSD: 26 ans d'experience feront toujours la difference
--

Jukka Marin | 2 Jun 12:26 2005
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Re: what is a serial BREAK ?

On Thu, Jun 02, 2005 at 11:51:52AM +0200, Manuel Bouyer wrote:
> What is, from an electrical POW, a BREAK on a serial line ?
> A long period at high voltage level, a long period at the low voltage
> level, or a long period at ground ?

It depends where you look.  At the UART pin, BREAK is a low-level pulse
that lasts as long as or longer than one full character time including
start and stop bits.  In normal 8N1 communication you have one start
bit, 8 data bits, and one stop bit - so BREAK is a low-level condition
lasting 10 or more bit times.

The RS232 drivers and receivers are inverting, so a low level at the
UART output is seen as +12 V on the serial cable.  When the data signal
is idle, it is at -12 V.  (These levels vary - with the drivers used
today, the levels are more like +/- 6 volts or so.)

> I plan to use a MAX232 to convert the TTL signal to RS232 levels,
> and I don't know if I can generate a BREAK by driving the
> MAX232 input, or if I need some extra circuitery.

Yes you can..

  -jm

Johnny Billquist | 2 Jun 12:54 2005
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Re: what is a serial BREAK ?

On Thu, 2 Jun 2005, Manuel Bouyer wrote:

> Hi,
> not strictly NetBSD-related (although my primary concern is to be able
> to enter NetBSD's ddb from the system I'm designing :) but I know there are
> some knowlegeable peoples here.
>
> What is, from an electrical POW, a BREAK on a serial line ?
> A long period at high voltage level, a long period at the low voltage
> level, or a long period at ground ?
>
> I plan to use a MAX232 to convert the TTL signal to RS232 levels,
> and I don't know if I can generate a BREAK by driving the
> MAX232 input, or if I need some extra circuitery.

I assume you know how normal asynch characters look on the line.
You don't need any extra circutry. It's a long logical zero. It's like if
you were to send a nul character, but instead of getting the stop bit at
the end (which always is a 1) you continue to transmit 0.

So electrically, nothing different from normal levels. Protocol wise, it's
a framing error. A break can be as long as you care to. Once you get a
framing error, and the data is all zeroes, you have detected a break.

Strictly electrical, it's a positive signal. The exact level is rather
free in RS-232 (I think the spec says something like 5-15V. Positive for a
zero, and negative for a one)

	Johnny

(Continue reading)

Robert Elz | 2 Jun 15:28 2005
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Re: what is a serial BREAK ?

    Date:        Thu, 2 Jun 2005 12:54:38 +0200 (CEST)
    From:        Johnny Billquist <bqt <at> Update.UU.SE>
    Message-ID:  <Pine.LNX.4.62.0506021249200.4692 <at> Psilocybe.Update.UU.SE>

  | Once you get a
  | framing error, and the data is all zeroes, you have detected a break.

That's a risky assumption - some detection hardware/software distinguishes
between a framing error that just happens to occur on a nul character,
and a true break, which is generally required to be a lot longer (perhaps
100ms or so).

As others said though, for Manuel, any RS232/RS422 line driver chip
can generate breaks, it is just a long continuous sequence of 0 "bits"
(with no 1's at all).

Most uarts have a "send break" or "send long space" command that generates
a long sequence of 0's, so if you have a uart connected to the line driver,
it should just be programming.   Even if the uart is lacking this trivial
feature, the normal technique to simulate it is to switch to an absurdly
slow bit rate (50bps, maybe 110bps) and send a 0 character.   At the receiver,
still running at a rational rate, that usually looks just like a break
condition (even though 50bps is still only 20ms).

kre

Johnny Billquist | 2 Jun 20:53 2005
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Re: what is a serial BREAK ?

On Thu, 2 Jun 2005, Robert Elz wrote:

>     Date:        Thu, 2 Jun 2005 12:54:38 +0200 (CEST)
>     From:        Johnny Billquist <bqt <at> Update.UU.SE>
>     Message-ID:  <Pine.LNX.4.62.0506021249200.4692 <at> Psilocybe.Update.UU.SE>
>
>   | Once you get a
>   | framing error, and the data is all zeroes, you have detected a break.
>
> That's a risky assumption - some detection hardware/software distinguishes
> between a framing error that just happens to occur on a nul character,
> and a true break, which is generally required to be a lot longer (perhaps
> 100ms or so).

I don't think there is a specified time for a break character. And older
hardware have no way to differ between a NUL with framing error, and a
break.

But these are nitpicks. If your uart have a special break detection signal
(or status bit), then you probably would use it. If not, then check the
framing error combined with a NUL.

	Johnny

Johnny Billquist                  || "I'm on a bus
                                  ||  on a psychedelic trip
email: bqt <at> update.uu.se           ||  Reading murder books
pdp is alive!                     ||  tryin' to stay hip" - B. Idol

(Continue reading)

John Clark | 2 Jun 21:31 2005

Re: what is a serial BREAK ?

Johnny Billquist wrote:

>On Thu, 2 Jun 2005, Robert Elz wrote:
>
>  
>
>>    Date:        Thu, 2 Jun 2005 12:54:38 +0200 (CEST)
>>    From:        Johnny Billquist <bqt <at> Update.UU.SE>
>>    Message-ID:  <Pine.LNX.4.62.0506021249200.4692 <at> Psilocybe.Update.UU.SE>
>>
>>  | Once you get a
>>  | framing error, and the data is all zeroes, you have detected a break.
>>
>>That's a risky assumption - some detection hardware/software distinguishes
>>between a framing error that just happens to occur on a nul character,
>>and a true break, which is generally required to be a lot longer (perhaps
>>100ms or so).
>>    
>>
>
>I don't think there is a specified time for a break character. And older
>hardware have no way to differ between a NUL with framing error, and a
>break.
>  
>

I was not able to find a spec on how long break signal was on a Teletype 
33 or similar. But one
number I saw for a different system, gave 500ms as the time for a 'break 
signal'. The origin of
(Continue reading)


Gmane