Hubert Feyrer | 1 Dec 23:44 2005

[bsd-events] Cebit 2006 (FreeBSD, OpenBSD, *BSD) (fwd)


There will be a joing *BSD booth at the 2006 CeBit in Hannover, Germany. 
Volunteers representing NetBSD are still wanted. Please see the following 
link for more (german language) information:

      http://www.bsdforen.de/showthread.php?p=105290

If you have questions that can't be answered there, let me know, I can 
help and translate etc. :-)

  - Hubert

Hubert Feyrer | 2 Dec 00:27 2005

[bsd-events] FOSDEM 2006 in Brüssel 25.+26.02.2006 (fwd)


Anyone wanna NetBSD duty at the FOSDEM *BSD booth?
Please contact Daniel directly, thanks!

  - Hubert

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Fri, 02 Dec 2005 00:11:40 +0100
From: Daniel Seuffert <DS <at> praxisvermittlung24.de>
To: bsd-events <at> bsdhh.org
Subject: [bsd-events] FOSDEM 2006 in Brüssel 25.+26.02.2006

Liebe Leute,

gegenwärtig bildet sich ein Team aus OpenBSD und FreeBSD-Leuten für die
Organisation von Ständen und ein 2-tägiges Vortragsprogramm in einem
separaten Vortragsraum. Es sollen 14 oder 16 Vorträge auf der FOSDEM
gehalten werden.

Federführend sind Wim Vandeputte für OpenBSD und meine Wenigkeit für FreeBSD.

Wer sich am Stand oder mit Vorträgen jedweder Art beteiligen möchte, der
ist um Kontaktaufnahme und Meldung gebeten.

Ich kenne keinen NetBSD-Menschen in Belgien. weiß jemand Bescheid oder
möchte sich selbst für NetBSD oder ein anderes BSD einbringen? Bitte
ebenfalls melden. Ich fände es sehr schade, wenn diese imho sehr gute
Veranstaltung (immerhin zweitgrößtes OS-event in Europa) wieder ohne
Beteiligung von NetBSD vorüberzieht.

(Continue reading)

Jan Schaumann | 8 Dec 18:51 2005

ddj articles on SoC

The second round of DDJ articles on the SoC are up:

http://www.ddj.com/documents/s=9938/ddj0601d/0601d.html#0601ds2

This one includes the NDIS driver project for NetBSD.

-Jan

--

-- 
The reader is encouraged to add smileys where necessary to increase
positive perception.  Right here might be a good place:
Jeremy C. Reed | 8 Dec 20:28 2005
Picon

using 3.0 features in production environment?

Are you using any new 3.0 features in production at your company or
organization?

This could be new hardware support, new administration and security 
features, etc.

I am working on a press release for the upcoming NetBSD 3.0.

Please send me a note (off-list) about what new 3.0 feature(s) you use and 
why it is significant for you.

Thanks,

  Jeremy C. Reed

  	  	 	 technical support & remote administration
 	  	 	 http://www.pugetsoundtechnology.com/

Mike Cheponis | 9 Dec 00:01 2005

OS Software for the $100 World Computer (NetBSD) (fwd)

Hi, I volunteered to contact the folks at MIT to offer them NetBSD for use on the $100 World Computer, since
I'm an MIT alum.

Here's the response.

-Mike

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 08 Dec 2005 17:37:50 -0500
From: Jim Gettys <jg <at> freedesktop.org>
To: mac <at> wireless.com
Subject: OS Software for the $100 World Computer  (NetBSD)

Mike,

To begin with, a hearty welcome to NetBSD!

The machine is an open platform, for people to do as they will with, and
NetBSD is certainly more than welcome to play, as is everyone else. To
the extent possible, we'll make specifications available as soon as they
solidify.  In some cases, some components may not yet be in the market,
and you'll probably have to get NDA's to get the detailed specs (for
example, we may choose to use a new version of the AMD Geode, for which
specifications are not yet public).

To first order, you can get a good idea of the baseline (lower bound) of
the hardware at http://www.gettysfamily.org/wordpress/. More exact
details will be forthcoming as the machine design solidifies over the
next few months (modulo the issue mentioned in the paragraph above).

(Continue reading)

Herb Peyerl | 9 Dec 00:09 2005

Re: OS Software for the $100 World Computer (NetBSD) (fwd)


On 8-Dec-05, at 4:01 PM, Mike Cheponis wrote:
> The #1 challenge for NetBSD is that, as far as I know, none of the  
> BSD's
> have an equivalent to the Linux jffs2 (journalling flash file system,
> V2) file system found in Linux: the machine is flash based, and wear
> leveling essential for general purpose use.  I recommend the BSD  
> systems
> pool effort here if they can; this lack leaves *BSD maybe 2 years  
> behind
> Linux on one really key technology, somewhat to my surprise (I only
> discovered this last week).  Googling for "flash file system" on  
> the BSD
> portal was more than a bit disappointing.

Clearly we wouldn't want anything equivalent to Linux JFFS2.  We'd  
want something that actually worked well.  (I work with JFFS2 all day  
long.)

Hubert Feyrer | 9 Dec 00:11 2005

Re: OS Software for the $100 World Computer (NetBSD) (fwd)

On Thu, 8 Dec 2005, Herb Peyerl wrote:
> Clearly we wouldn't want anything equivalent to Linux JFFS2.  We'd want 
> something that actually worked well.  (I work with JFFS2 all day long.)

OK, I'll bring a chair and a rope, then we'll tie you up until you're 
done. How does that sound? :)

  - Hubert

Herb Peyerl | 9 Dec 00:12 2005

Re: OS Software for the $100 World Computer (NetBSD) (fwd)


On 8-Dec-05, at 4:11 PM, Hubert Feyrer wrote:
> On Thu, 8 Dec 2005, Herb Peyerl wrote:
>> Clearly we wouldn't want anything equivalent to Linux JFFS2.  We'd  
>> want something that actually worked well.  (I work with JFFS2 all  
>> day long.)
>
> OK, I'll bring a chair and a rope, then we'll tie you up until  
> you're done. How does that sound? :)

I get paid to hack lignux.  I forgot how to write good code.  :-)

David Young | 9 Dec 01:36 2005
Picon

Re: OS Software for the $100 World Computer (NetBSD) (fwd)

On Thu, Dec 08, 2005 at 03:01:14PM -0800, Mike Cheponis wrote:
> Hi, I volunteered to contact the folks at MIT to offer them NetBSD for use 
> on the $100 World Computer, since I'm an MIT alum.
> 
> Here's the response.

Mike,

NetBSD is in a good position to supply important parts of the $100
Laptop's software.  I lead a project called CUWiN (www.cuwireless.net)
that makes open-source, NetBSD-based, IPv4/IPv6 wireless "mesh" routers,
favoring the Atheros chipset.  A couple of the routers we have around
town (http://www.meshsandbox.com/cuwin.html) use an AMD Geode processor.
It would be easy to port CUWiN's wireless routing to the $100 Laptop as
it is presently specified.

(Incidentally, the $100 Laptop project's goals are resonant with
CUWiN's.  Our principle funder is George Soros' Open Society Institute,
whose interest in wireless networking is for building communications
infrastructure in the developing world.  Our system is in-use in Apirede,
Ghana, and we anticipate a deployment in South Africa.)

I haven't missed JFFS2, but we use a (mostly) read-only FFS on a
CompactFlash card, which has wear-leveling built in.  I am more concerned
about kern/30525.

Dave

> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> Date: Thu, 08 Dec 2005 17:37:50 -0500
(Continue reading)

David Young | 14 Dec 09:56 2005
Picon

$100 Laptop, NetBSD, wireless mesh

Here are my scattered thoughts about the $100 Laptop, NetBSD, and mesh
networking.

I have not been able to pinpoint the goals of the $100 Laptop project's
"meshes".  Is it for connectivity in a classroom, throughout a town,
or cross-country?  Is it for web browsing, P2P messaging and/or phone?
IP radio broadcast?  I ask because I am convinced that it will be
unnecessary, and enormously difficult, to deliver the mesh networking
"ideal" by the $100 Laptop's "due date" in 2006.  The ideal, to my
mind, is peer-to-peer broadband IP transport on a metro-scale radio
relay network.  But that is probably not what the $100 Laptop project
has in mind, though.  I am interested to hear more specifics.

I've worked on a "mesh" network in Urbana, Illinois, for a few years now.
Our small group's achievements are rather modest, but we have built a
good foundation for mesh experimentation, both in open-source software
(NetBSD improvements, routing software), and in the town (~32 rooftop
wireless routers).  Our project has been funded, in part, by the Open
Society Institute (OSI), which is interested in meshes as communications
infrastructure for the developing world.

For the networking geeks, here is the path from my house to a neighbor's
a few blocks away; it might be illuminating to enter the street addresses
into Google Maps:

traceroute to n308.w.washington (10.0.10.172), 64 hops max, 40 byte packets
 1  n801.s.walnut (10.0.237.100)  10.298 ms  8.088 ms  5.390 ms
 2  n113.w.washington (10.0.237.108)  58.029 ms  103.887 ms  7.903 ms
 3  n308.w.washington (10.0.10.172)  88.963 ms  7.013 ms  7.576 ms

(Continue reading)


Gmane