Jeremy C. Reed | 1 Nov 01:58 2005
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BSD Certification Group releases Usage Survey Report

The  BSD  Certification Group published its Usage Survey Report today.
This report summarizes the results from the BSD Usage Survey delivered
by  the  Group. The survey was available in six languages and ran from
September 12 to September 30, 2005.

The survey contained 18 questions covering topics such as how many BSD
systems  were  in  use at a company, how many administrators, were the
BSD  systems  used  as servers or desktops, size of the organizations,
what services the BSD systems provided, and related topics.

According  to  the report, FreeBSD is used at 77 percent of the survey
takers'  organizations.  Over  87  percent  of the systems are managed
internally.  Near 79 percent of the BSD systems are used as production
systems.  Around  72  percent of the systems are used for web services
hosting and also firewall or security services.

"It  is  interesting  to  note  from  the survey results that at least
68,662  systems  and maybe more than 177,265 systems are running a BSD
operating  system,"  said  Jeremy C. Reed, a BSD trainer and member of
the BSD Certification Group.

The  report  also  provides  many comments from survey takers, further
explaining their use of BSD systems in their organizations.

The  report  says  that the results indicate that BSD systems are used
throughout  the world and are well respected for their reliability and
inherent security.

The report is available for download at
http://www.bsdcertification.org/downloads/pr_20051031_usage_survey_en_en.pdf.
(Continue reading)

Steve | 1 Nov 06:37 2005
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Re: Website design proposal

What I've done in the past, when I've wanted to add rounded corners,
gradients, or other complex effects to tabs or headers, is to specify
the background as a top-aligned image with the
corner/gradient/what-have-you effects, and to then specify the
background color, on top of that, as the same color as the bottom of
the image. The image itself shows the effects, and the background
color accounts for any overflow.

On 10/31/05, Wolfgang S. Rupprecht
<wolfgang+gnus200510 <at> dailyplanet.dontspam.wsrcc.com> wrote:
>
> Alan Post <apost <at> recalcitrant.org> writes:
> > Using galeon 1.2.14:
> >
> > If one increases the font size, the header text gets its bottom cut
> > off.
>
> I think this will happen with any browser.  The orange header
> highlighting is done with a *.png (which doesn't scale with the font).
>
> One way that scales would be to have a section (perhaps a "div") with
> "background-color: orange" and let the xhtml engine fill in the color.
>
> The downside of pure xhtml rendering is that you do lose the ability
> to make a rounded corner.  There are some hacks to do this too
> involving cutting the background picture up into repeating and
> non-repeating sub parts.
>
>    http://www.sovavsiti.cz/css/corners.html
>
(Continue reading)

Liam J. Foy | 2 Nov 17:59 2005

Re: Website design proposal

On 01:25, Sun 30 Oct 05, Eric Benoit wrote:
> Liam J. Foy wrote:
> 
> >Yeah,  me too. I'd love to see a process of it becoming NetBSD.org.
> >However, I think we need Jacak to show us an actual working design
> >we can view in our browsers. /me pokes Jacak.
> 
> Here's my attempt at recreating it:
> 
> http://www.oddity.ca/~eric/netbsd/
> 

Lovely work Eric. I just wish I could see something done with the
design now!

Cheers,
--

-- 
		Liam J. Foy
		liamfoy <at> sepulcrum.org

Hubert Feyrer | 5 Nov 23:00 2005

Re: Powered by NetBSD logos


FYI,
I've copied your files form http://www.gdansk.int.pl/~jacek/netbsd-logo/ 
into NetBSD's htdocs/images/logos/jacek-* (in addition to the ones that 
were already there), and they should appear on this page within an hour:

 	http://www.NetBSD.org/gallery/other-logos.html

BTW: we've just updated the official logo to contain a (R) to indicate 
that the image itself is a registered trademark (we're forced to add it to 
show we're willing to defend our trademark; it's not that we think that 
makes the logo more beautiful ;). Dunno if it's worth updating your logos.

If you do, please drop me mail, and by all means keep the filenames. ;)

  - Hubert

Magnus Eriksson | 15 Nov 04:26 2005

Re: updated NetBSD hardware lists

On Mon, 14 Nov 2005, Andy Ruhl wrote:

> On 11/12/05, Rick Kelly <rmk <at> toad.rmkhome.com> wrote:

>> Are there any online lists of modern, shipping hardware that works with
>> NetBSD i386/amd64?
>>
>> For instance, http://www.netbsd.org/Hardware/pci.html, seems to be mostly
>> ancient hardware that isn't sold anymore.

[...]

> I agree the supported hardware list is out of date, but it's also
> almost too difficult to maintain unless all the device driver authors
> make a list of what hardware is supported by that driver. Then it
> becomes even more complicated when you need to match chipsets to
> actual retail device models, which can change even with the same model
> number (Linksys version numbers come to mind).

   But is there really any alternative to having it updated?  That list is 
one of the first things you'll see, and if people are considering their 
options, having a big list of mostly obsolete hardware won't exactly make 
people go "wow".

   Perhaps a wiki-based approach?  It would be enough (I believe) adding a 
link to a wiki page that people are free to edit, and periodically 
updating the (official) supported hardware list from the wiki.  Enough to 
make a big difference in the impression of NetBSD, that is.

   It would also be somewhere you could post your success stories, it 
(Continue reading)

Andy Ruhl | 15 Nov 13:26 2005
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Re: updated NetBSD hardware lists

On 11/14/05, Magnus Eriksson <magetoo <at> fastmail.fm> wrote:
> On Mon, 14 Nov 2005, Andy Ruhl wrote:
>
> > On 11/12/05, Rick Kelly <rmk <at> toad.rmkhome.com> wrote:
>
> >> Are there any online lists of modern, shipping hardware that works with
> >> NetBSD i386/amd64?
> >>
> >> For instance, http://www.netbsd.org/Hardware/pci.html, seems to be mostly
> >> ancient hardware that isn't sold anymore.
>
> [...]
>
> > I agree the supported hardware list is out of date, but it's also
> > almost too difficult to maintain unless all the device driver authors
> > make a list of what hardware is supported by that driver. Then it
> > becomes even more complicated when you need to match chipsets to
> > actual retail device models, which can change even with the same model
> > number (Linksys version numbers come to mind).
>
>    But is there really any alternative to having it updated?  That list is
> one of the first things you'll see, and if people are considering their
> options, having a big list of mostly obsolete hardware won't exactly make
> people go "wow".
>
>    Perhaps a wiki-based approach?  It would be enough (I believe) adding a
> link to a wiki page that people are free to edit, and periodically
> updating the (official) supported hardware list from the wiki.  Enough to
> make a big difference in the impression of NetBSD, that is.
>
(Continue reading)

Geert Hendrickx | 15 Nov 13:38 2005
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Re: updated NetBSD hardware lists

On Tue, Nov 15, 2005 at 05:26:25AM -0700, Andy Ruhl wrote:
> The best place to know if something is supported is the mailing lists.  I
> do make a point of posting a dmesg to the mailing lists or describing a
> piece of hardware that worked for me, if possible. If everyone did that,
> it would be really nice. As a matter of fact, it would be really nice to
> have a mailing list just for making devices work, whether they are built
> in or add on. Something like netbsd-devices, netbsd-peripherials,
> whatever. Most devices don't need to be platform specific so that's a
> place where everyone could get together and discuss devices.

The OpenBSD installer asks users to mail their dmesg to some address (I
think dmesg <at> openbsd.org), we could do something similar to auto-generate a
list of supported devices?  

	Geert

Andy Ruhl | 15 Nov 13:51 2005
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Re: updated NetBSD hardware lists

On 11/15/05, Geert Hendrickx <ghen <at> telenet.be> wrote:
> On Tue, Nov 15, 2005 at 05:26:25AM -0700, Andy Ruhl wrote:
> > The best place to know if something is supported is the mailing lists.  I
> > do make a point of posting a dmesg to the mailing lists or describing a
> > piece of hardware that worked for me, if possible. If everyone did that,
> > it would be really nice. As a matter of fact, it would be really nice to
> > have a mailing list just for making devices work, whether they are built
> > in or add on. Something like netbsd-devices, netbsd-peripherials,
> > whatever. Most devices don't need to be platform specific so that's a
> > place where everyone could get together and discuss devices.
>
> The OpenBSD installer asks users to mail their dmesg to some address (I
> think dmesg <at> openbsd.org), we could do something similar to auto-generate a
> list of supported devices?

The problem is still that the dmesg often doesn't say what a device
actually is as it relates to it's retail package. But that would be a
good idea anyway.

Andy

Mike Cheponis | 15 Nov 13:59 2005

$100 laptops' OS?

I see that "somebody" has chosen Dead Cat leenooks to run on the $100 AMD 3rd world laptop.

What's involved in getting them to switch to a More Appropriate Choice of OS?

Thanks -Mike

Herb Peyerl | 15 Nov 14:02 2005

Re: $100 laptops' OS?


On Nov 15, 2005, at 5:59 AM, Mike Cheponis wrote:
> I see that "somebody" has chosen Dead Cat leenooks to run on the  
> $100 AMD 3rd world laptop.
>
> What's involved in getting them to switch to a More Appropriate  
> Choice of OS?

MIT is the heart of hippie GPL territory... It's "Free", even if it  
costs $18,000 to buy gcc from Montavista.


Gmane