Jonathan Rees | 1 Apr 02:31 2011

303 redirect to a preexisting document

I'm doing a bit of research and could use some help... does anyone
know of an instance of a 303 redirect being used in a semantic web
context where the target document does NOT contain the URI being
defined (even as a base URI)?

For example, a URI 'http://example/chicago' for which a GET request
yields a 303 response with Location:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago (which is a page that existed
before the URI 'http://example/chicago' was 'minted' and therefore
does not contain that URI).

This is an empirical question, not a theoretical one - I'm looking for
real examples.

Thanks
Jonathan

Hugh Glaser | 1 Apr 05:05 2011
Picon

Re: 303 redirect to a preexisting document

All of the user pages at ECS <at> Southampton may fit your bill, I think.
http://id.ecs.soton.ac.uk/person/21
303s to
http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/people/hg
which was the existing user page.
Of course that page now has the URI in it, but essentially as more information about me that has become
available in the meantime.

Similarly, the latest version of ePrints (eprints.org) now does RDF,
so some stuff goes on to sort out redirection to pages that had URLs.
Eg http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/21681

Cheers
Hugh

On 1 Apr 2011, at 01:31, Jonathan Rees wrote:

> I'm doing a bit of research and could use some help... does anyone
> know of an instance of a 303 redirect being used in a semantic web
> context where the target document does NOT contain the URI being
> defined (even as a base URI)?
> 
> For example, a URI 'http://example/chicago' for which a GET request
> yields a 303 response with Location:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago (which is a page that existed
> before the URI 'http://example/chicago' was 'minted' and therefore
> does not contain that URI).
> 
> This is an empirical question, not a theoretical one - I'm looking for
> real examples.
(Continue reading)

Gregg Reynolds | 1 Apr 08:56 2011

Natural RDF

Hi list,

Just for fun I decided to put together a proof-of-concept doc to see what a purely syntactic definition of RDF might look like.  The basic idea is pretty simple; just define a meta syntax, some relations on graphs (shape isomorphism, congruence), and a bunch of "reduction" rules (a/k/a inferencing rules, transformation rules).  The rules are modeled on the introduction/elimination rules of natural deduction.  

It's not yet complete but is sufficiently detailed to establish the plausibility of the approach.  I think.  The result looks pretty promising to me; I suspect a rigorous, simple, and clear definition of RDF without the model theory stuff could probably be done in under five pages.  Comments?

RDIL: RDF with a Human Face

Thanks,

Gregg
Richard Cyganiak | 1 Apr 10:06 2011
Picon

Re: SPARLQ endpoint discovery


On 31 Mar 2011, at 19:55, William Waites wrote:
> ] I'm looking for some references about SPARQL endpoint discovery. I know 
> ] that it is common to have the SPARQL endpoint available at /sparql. 
> ] However, I wonder if there is something published about the discovery of 
> ] these endpoints (e.g. how sindicebot works, or discovery of endpoints 
> ] used in Web forms).
> 
> The void vocabulary lets you speficy the sparql endpoint 
> containing a particular dataset.

To be more precise:
http://www.w3.org/TR/void/#well-known

This states that on domain www.example.com, the URI

http://www.example.com/.well-known/void

can be expected to be a redirect to an RDF document that describes any RDF datasets hosted on that domain,
expressed in the VoID vocabulary. Looking for void:sparqlEndpoint triples in such a VoID description
would yield the endpoint URL.

Best,
Richard

> 
> A related question is SPARQL endpoint fingerprinting... Which
> is not necessarily straightforward as often people put them
> behind HTTP reverse proxies that stomp on identifiable 
> headers... In principle it would be interesting to do a 
> survey to see the relative prevalence of different SPARQL
> implementations.
> 
> -w
> -- 
> William Waites                <mailto:ww <at> styx.org>
> http://river.styx.org/ww/        <sip:ww <at> styx.org>
> F4B3 39BF E775 CF42 0BAB  3DF0 BE40 A6DF B06F FD45
> 

Miao Chen | 1 Apr 17:07 2011
Picon

Are there botany ontology and soil ontology?

Hi,


I am working on an ontology project related to both botany and soil. I wonder if there's existing ontologies on botany or soil? Could you please let me know if there are such ones? I'd really appreciate your answers.

Thank you,
Miao
Carlo Torniai | 1 Apr 17:21 2011
Picon

Re: Are there botany ontology and soil ontology?

Miao,

I hope it helps.
Best,
Carlo


On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 8:07 AM, Miao Chen <viviny <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

I am working on an ontology project related to both botany and soil. I wonder if there's existing ontologies on botany or soil? Could you please let me know if there are such ones? I'd really appreciate your answers.

Thank you,
Miao



--
Carlo

Alexander Garcia Castro | 1 Apr 17:27 2011
Picon

Re: Are there botany ontology and soil ontology?

go to bioportal; most if not all of biomedical ontologies are available from bioportal http://bioportal.bioontology.org/




On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 10:07 AM, Miao Chen <viviny <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

I am working on an ontology project related to both botany and soil. I wonder if there's existing ontologies on botany or soil? Could you please let me know if there are such ones? I'd really appreciate your answers.

Thank you,
Miao



--
Alexander Garcia
http://www.alexandergarcia.name/
http://www.usefilm.com/photographer/75943.html
http://www.linkedin.com/in/alexgarciac
Postal address:
Alexander Garcia, Tel.: +49 421 218 64211
Universität Bremen
Enrique-Schmidt-Str. 5
D-28359 Bremen
Alexander Garcia Castro | 1 Apr 19:56 2011
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Re: Are there botany ontology and soil ontology?

http://koios.generationcp.org/ontology-lookup/ontologyList.do this is a useful link as well. 
There is also biotea.ws which has to do with ontologies for agriculture but it is heavily biased towards describing experiments based on OBI. 

On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 10:07 AM, Miao Chen <viviny <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

I am working on an ontology project related to both botany and soil. I wonder if there's existing ontologies on botany or soil? Could you please let me know if there are such ones? I'd really appreciate your answers.

Thank you,
Miao



--
Alexander Garcia
http://www.alexandergarcia.name/
http://www.usefilm.com/photographer/75943.html
http://www.linkedin.com/in/alexgarciac
Postal address:
Alexander Garcia, Tel.: +49 421 218 64211
Universität Bremen
Enrique-Schmidt-Str. 5
D-28359 Bremen
Picon

Re: Are there botany ontology and soil ontology?

You may also want to check: AGRIS: http://agris.fao.org/ for soil

Milton Ponson
GSM: +297 747 8280
PO Box 1154, Oranjestad
Aruba, Dutch Caribbean
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--- On Fri, 4/1/11, Miao Chen <viviny <at> gmail.com> wrote:

From: Miao Chen <viviny <at> gmail.com>
Subject: Are there botany ontology and soil ontology?
To: semantic-web <at> w3.org
Date: Friday, April 1, 2011, 3:07 PM

Hi,

I am working on an ontology project related to both botany and soil. I wonder if there's existing ontologies on botany or soil? Could you please let me know if there are such ones? I'd really appreciate y our answers.

Thank you,
Miao
Kingsley Idehen | 2 Apr 23:55 2011
Picon

LOD Cloud Cache Stats

All,

I've knocked up a Google spreadsheet that contains stats about our 21 
Billion Triples+ LOD cloud cache.

On the issue of Triple Counts, you can't make sense of Data if you can't 
count it. We can't depend on SPARQL-FED for distributed queries, and we 
absolutely cannot depend on a Web crawl via follow-your-nose pattern 
when seeking insights or answers to queries across massive volumes of data.

The whole BigData game is a huge opportunity for Linked Data and 
Semantics to finally shine. By shine I mean: show what was erstwhile 
impossible.

Exhibit #1 -- how do we Find the proverbial needle in a haystack via 
ad-hoc queries at Web Scale?

Exhibit #2 -- how do we leverage faceted exploration and navigation of 
massive data sets at Web Scale?

Exhibit #3 -- how do we perform ad-hoc declarative queries (Join and 
Aggregates variety) that used to be confined to a local Oracle, SQL 
Server, DB2, Informix, MySQL etc.., at Web Scales esp. if the Web is now 
a Global Linked Data Space?

I've issued a challenge to all BigData players to show me a public 
endpoint that allows me to perform any of the tasks above. Thus far, the 
silence has been predictably deafening :-)

Links:

1. 
https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AihbIyhlsQSxdHViMFdIYWZxWE85enNkRHJwZXV4cXc&hl=en 
-- LOD Cloud Cache SPARQL stats queries and results

--

-- 

Regards,

Kingsley Idehen	
President&  CEO
OpenLink Software
Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
Weblog: http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen
Twitter/Identi.ca: kidehen


Gmane