Dave Johanson | 1 Mar 18:09 2009
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Re: KDE Problem

Thanks Eric, I'll go that route if I have any further problems; for now, 
it all appears to be working.

dave

Eric Butler wrote:
> You can install the "kubuntu-desktop" package, which will pull in all 
> required KDE packages.
>
>   - Eric
>
> On Thu, Feb 26, 2009 at 4:22 PM, Dave Johanson <dcjohan <at> bmi.net 
> <mailto:dcjohan <at> bmi.net>> wrote:
>
>     Mark Foster wrote:
>>     Dave Johanson wrote:
>>>     I did an update to the system (Ubuntu 8.10) last night which
>>>     said it went well with no problems. It lied. This morning when I
>>>     tried to boot into my default KDE desktop I got the follow error
>>>     message and failure to boot into the KDE desktop although the
>>>     gnome desktop works fine.
>>>
>>>     Xsession: unable to launch x session - - -  "/usr/bin/startkde"
>>>     not found, falling back to default session.
>>>
>>>     It's true, startkde is not to be found in /usr/bin, but I have
>>>     no idea as to how that got lost, what it contains, or what to
>>>     write to replace it.  Any suggestions greatly appreciated.
>>>
>>     According to http://packages.ubuntu.com/ this file is in package
(Continue reading)

john_re | 4 Mar 15:33 2009
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Global Linux Meeting March 7 Sat BerkeleyTIP -Global - For Forwarding

Ekiga(Gnome meeting), Asterisk, Xen, Virtualbox, Debian 15 Years, Free
and Open Future, Amarok, ZFS, FreeBSD, Python, OLPC

=====  SCHEDULE
Schedule: All times Pacific Std Time = GMT -8H 
             ex: 10A PST = 1P Eastern ST
10 A    Begin:  Set up.  Get on IRC & VOIP
11 A    Ekiga3 talk LIVE
        INSTALLFEST begin
12 N    Asterisk, OLPC;
        PROGRAMMING PARTY: VOIP Conference client & server
 1 P    Xen, Virtualbox; GNOME
 2 P    KDE – GUI; Macintosh
 3 P    Debian; BSD; College & University groups
 4 P    Free & Open Future; Culture; Hardware
 5 P    LIGHTNING TALKS
        Python; INetWebDev; Local Simultaneous Meetings Arrangements

=====  PHYSICAL LOCATION: UC Berkeley FREE SPEECH CAFE
At Moffitt Undergrad Library.
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=h&ll=37.872558,-122.260795&spn=0.001776,0.002529&z=19
http://sites.google.com/site/berkeleytip/directions
BART: Berkeley Downtown Station.
Caltrain: Berkeley Station, bus up University to campus.
Car: 880 Freeway, University Exit.

=====  IRC & VOIP
Join IRC freenode.net #berkeleytip, & we'll help you get on VOIP
http://sites.google.com/site/berkeleytip/remote-attendance

(Continue reading)

JT Gray | 8 Mar 02:58 2009
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Interactive Kernel Map

Just found this through the LDN site:  http://www.makelinux.net/kernel_map (orig link to it: http://ldn.linuxfoundation.org/article/interactive-map-linux-kernel).  Interesting to look at, though the UI isn't ideal for navigating the chart.  Still, I like being able to see information presented in different formats.  I hadn't seen (or noticed anyway) this site, makelinux.net, before, but they have a few handy charts and diagrams of Linux/FOSS software.

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NaNO2x | 11 Mar 00:32 2009
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Meeting 2009-03-14

It seems that another month has come and the schedule is a bit light
again.  This email is to let everyone know that there will be a
meeting at Isilon systems on this upcoming Saturday.  The page can be
found at http://wiki.gslug.org/index.php/Meeting_2009-03-14

We are in need of more talks and more attendees so please sign up.
Hope to see everyone there.

-William

Utinam me logica falsa tuam philosophiam totam suffodiant.
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David | 12 Mar 01:31 2009
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SSH on port 443

Having just enough information to make me confident to try things I should not be doing...

I am volunteering for an organization that has 'free wifi' but blocks just about every port.  I need to SSH into my work box, for which I have pretty extensive control over the network & firewall.

The extent of my knowledge has led me to the following 'solution': I set my SSH port to listen on port 443 since this port is not locked by the 'free wifi' provider (Note: my work does not host any 'secure' pages so hijacking this port does not thwart any current(!) activity).

I'm feeling like I don't know what I don't know, so I'm asking if this is a really bad idea?

David

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Paul Bartell | 12 Mar 01:34 2009
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Re: SSH on port 443

A bad idea? no. People do it all the time. Something you might want to
consider though is if your work ever does want to host secure pages,
someone is going to be asking questions. It might be something you
want to do at home instead.

On Wed, Mar 11, 2009 at 5:31 PM, David <davidm777 <at> yahoo.com> wrote:
> Having just enough information to make me confident to try things I should
> not be doing...
>
> I am volunteering for an organization that has 'free wifi' but blocks just
> about every port.  I need to SSH into my work box, for which I have pretty
> extensive control over the network & firewall.
>
> The extent of my knowledge has led me to the following 'solution': I set my
> SSH port to listen on port 443 since this port is not locked by the 'free
> wifi' provider (Note: my work does not host any 'secure' pages so hijacking
> this port does not thwart any current(!) activity).
>
> I'm feeling like I don't know what I don't know, so I'm asking if this is a
> really bad idea?
>
> David
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Gslug-general mailing list
> Gslug-general <at> gslug.org
> http://lists.gslug.org/mailman/listinfo/gslug-general
>

--

-- 
Random quote of the week/month/whenever i get to updating it:
"Opportunity knocked. My doorman threw him out." - Adrienne Gusoff

"At school you don't get parole, good behavior only brings a longer
sentence." - The History Boys
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Andrew Sweger | 12 Mar 03:30 2009
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Re: SSH on port 443

On Wed, 11 Mar 2009, David wrote:

> The extent of my knowledge has led me to the following 'solution': I
> set my SSH port to listen on port 443 since this port is not locked by
> the 'free wifi' provider (Note: my work does not host any 'secure'
> pages so hijacking this port does not thwart any current(!) activity).
> 
> I'm feeling like I don't know what I don't know, so I'm asking if this
> is a really bad idea?

Aside from any future need to serve web pages over SSL, this is a fine
idea. I've used it on spare IPs myself so I can get to my hosts from
corporate networks that block just about all outbound connections. 443 is
a difficult port to justify blocking since it's mostly line noise but
seemingly necessary to conduct business.

--

-- 
Andrew B. Sweger -- The great thing about multitasking is that several
                                things can go wrong at once.

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Ahmed Osman | 12 Mar 06:15 2009

Re: SSH on port 443

Could also consider using Stunnel[1]. I've read up on it a bit but never actually implemented it, sounds like this is the perfect scenario for its application.


[1] http://www.stunnel.org/
-Ahmed Osman


On Wed, Mar 11, 2009 at 7:30 PM, Andrew Sweger <andrew <at> sweger.net> wrote:
On Wed, 11 Mar 2009, David wrote:

> The extent of my knowledge has led me to the following 'solution': I
> set my SSH port to listen on port 443 since this port is not locked by
> the 'free wifi' provider (Note: my work does not host any 'secure'
> pages so hijacking this port does not thwart any current(!) activity).
>
> I'm feeling like I don't know what I don't know, so I'm asking if this
> is a really bad idea?

Aside from any future need to serve web pages over SSL, this is a fine
idea. I've used it on spare IPs myself so I can get to my hosts from
corporate networks that block just about all outbound connections. 443 is
a difficult port to justify blocking since it's mostly line noise but
seemingly necessary to conduct business.

--
Andrew B. Sweger -- The great thing about multitasking is that several
                               things can go wrong at once.

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Jack T Mudge III | 12 Mar 07:18 2009

Re: SSH on port 443

On Wednesday 11 March 2009 10:15:44 pm Ahmed Osman wrote:
> Could also consider using Stunnel[1]. I've read up on it a bit but never
> actually implemented it, sounds like this is the perfect scenario for its
> application.
>
>
> [1] http://www.stunnel.org/
> -Ahmed Osman
>

Isn't SSH already encrypted? Wrapping it in (another) SSL layer won't solve 
the port problem in any event. Just setting SSH to port 443 seems like a fine 
idea to me, but another interesting idea could be to tunnel SSH over HTTPS. 
Which has already been done: http://dag.wieers.com/howto/ssh-http-tunneling/

By the looks of it, you could do this alongside another HTTPS application, so 
it would also solve potential problems with that sort of conflict.

--

-- 
Sincerely,
Jack Mudge
jakykong <at> theanythingbox.com
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daleville | 12 Mar 16:11 2009
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Re: SSH on port 443

Something I've done in the past was push a port out from behind a
firewall using a tunnel. There was no way to open a port behind the
firewall and most ports were blocked going out (though you only need one).

# from a machine within your organizations network
ssh -N -f -R 50000:work_host_name:22 external_host_name

Leave off the -N and the -f if you want the port forwarding ssh session
to stay in the foreground and actually provide a shell. As is it will
simply set up the port forward then background.

This will tunnel all requests made to port 50000 on your external host
to your work machine's port 22.

So you could ssh to you work machine using:
ssh -p 50000 external_host_name

Jack T Mudge III wrote, On 03/11/2009 11:18 PM:
> On Wednesday 11 March 2009 10:15:44 pm Ahmed Osman wrote:
>> Could also consider using Stunnel[1]. I've read up on it a bit but never
>> actually implemented it, sounds like this is the perfect scenario for its
>> application.
>>
>>
>> [1] http://www.stunnel.org/
>> -Ahmed Osman
>>
> 
> Isn't SSH already encrypted? Wrapping it in (another) SSL layer won't solve 
> the port problem in any event. Just setting SSH to port 443 seems like a fine 
> idea to me, but another interesting idea could be to tunnel SSH over HTTPS. 
> Which has already been done: http://dag.wieers.com/howto/ssh-http-tunneling/
> 
> By the looks of it, you could do this alongside another HTTPS application, so 
> it would also solve potential problems with that sort of conflict.
> 
> 
> 
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