Paul Lussier | 1 Apr 02:21 2007
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Re: big mailing lists / slashdotable hosting

"Seth Cohn" <sethcohn@...> writes:

> Enter PHPList, a one/few to many mailing list. It's not meant for
> discussions, it's meant for promotion/newsletter/communication.  It's
> meant to make html easier (graphics/links), allow tracking, allow
> double opt-in and easy unsubbing, etc.

Ahh, interesting.  Thanks, I don't think I was previously aware such a
beast existed in the FOSS world. (This *is* FOSS, right?)

> Since I'm already in the queue to give a Drupal presentation in just
> under 2 weeks, a full PhpList presentation will have to wait...

I was just kidding :)

>> Can you explain?  Is this different than bandwidth limiting and/or
>> traffic shaping?
>
> Yes, different than both.  Those are lower level limits (ie
> wire-level).  PHPList does mailer-level limiting...  For example, you
> can limit how many emails go out within X amount of time (to avoid
> loading the server down)  Or You can limit how many emails go to any
> domain  at a time, (ie spread out your AOL, gmail, yahoo mail so it
> only sends X at once to them, and doesn't flood them at all once
> (looking more like spam to them, for example)

Ahh, that's what I thought, but wasn't sure.  Thanks for the
(clarific,confirm)ation.

--

-- 
(Continue reading)

Seth Cohn | 1 Apr 02:47 2007

Re: big mailing lists / slashdotable hosting

> > Enter PHPList, a one/few to many mailing list. It's not meant for
> > discussions, it's meant for promotion/newsletter/communication.  It's
> > meant to make html easier (graphics/links), allow tracking, allow
> > double opt-in and easy unsubbing, etc.
>
> Ahh, interesting.  Thanks, I don't think I was previously aware such a
> beast existed in the FOSS world. (This *is* FOSS, right?)

Indeed, FOSS.
See http://www.phplist.com/details for plenty more info...

> > Since I'm already in the queue to give a Drupal presentation in just
> > under 2 weeks, a full PhpList presentation will have to wait...
>
> I was just kidding :)

Me too.  But it is a good idea for a topic, so let's plan on something
in the fall...
Dan Jenkins | 1 Apr 04:15 2007

Re: big mailing lists / slashdotable hosting

Paul Lussier wrote:

>"Seth Cohn" <sethcohn@...> writes:
>
>>Enter PHPList, a one/few to many mailing list. It's not meant for
>>discussions, it's meant for promotion/newsletter/communication.  It's
>>meant to make html easier (graphics/links), allow tracking, allow
>>double opt-in and easy unsubbing, etc.
>>    
>>
>
>Ahh, interesting.  Thanks, I don't think I was previously aware such a
>beast existed in the FOSS world. (This *is* FOSS, right?)
>  
>
 From their web site:

> phplist is open source free software. it is 'free' by both senses of 
> the word;
>
>     * /libre/: you have freedom to view it, change it, and redistribute it
>     * /gratis/: it has zero cost
>
I had not been aware of this package and it looks very nice. Several of 
our clients ought to be quite happy with it.
(Thank you Seth.)

--

-- 
Dan Jenkins (dan@...)
Rastech Inc., Bedford, NH, USA --- 1-603-206-9951
(Continue reading)

Paul Lussier | 1 Apr 21:32 2007
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Re: Hey, procmail gurus

Bill Freeman <f <at> ke1g.mv.com> writes:

> Kevin D. Clark writes:
> ...
>  > 
>  > How about this recipe?  (two, actually)
>  > (not entirely tested...)
>  
> [ Here Kevin provides a bunch of stuff that looks like line noise.
> Not as bad as Teco, but still line noise. ]

IMO, it's bad form to criticize others who are trying to help you for
your own inadequacies.  Just because you can't read it, or don't like
it is no reason to be rude.

> Thanks.  perl hurts my eyes, but I'll see if I can understand it
> well enough to think that I could enhance it to my desired final
> level.

If you thought *that* was painful, I'm shocked you can look at any
kind of source code.  That perl was not only crystal clear, but no
worse than any python I've ever seen.

The only thing in that e-mail resembling line-noise imo, was this:

  # Bill wants to delete mail that has >15 responses
  :0w:
  * ^X-Number-Responses-Seen: \*\*\*\*\*\*\*\*\*\*\*\*\*\*\*
  /dev/null

(Continue reading)

Bruce Labitt | 1 Apr 21:48 2007
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IPv6 and IPv4 - how to shut off IPv6?

As a result of the mythfest install, my computer was setup with FC6.  
I'm unfamiliar with gnome and most of the tools.  My connections to the 
outside world are excruciatingly slow.  (Connection to google takes 
minutes, other computers on the same network, seconds.)  I do know that 
my router does not like to pass through IPv6 info, so I am suspecting 
something like this.

Are there some tools I can use to determine what is actually happening?  
Firewall or traffic analysis?  If someone could show some sort usage it 
would be greatly appreciated.

TIA
aluminumsulfate | 2 Apr 00:44 2007
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Re: IPv6 and IPv4 - how to shut off IPv6?

> Date: Sun, 01 Apr 2007 15:48:34 -0400
> From: Bruce Labitt <bruce.labitt@...>

> As a result of the mythfest install, my computer was setup with FC6.  

Go you!

> outside world are excruciatingly slow.  (Connection to google takes 
> minutes, other computers on the same network, seconds.)  I do know that 
> my router does not like to pass through IPv6 info, so I am suspecting 
> something like this.
> 
> Are there some tools I can use to determine what is actually happening?  
> Firewall or traffic analysis?  If someone could show some sort usage it 
> would be greatly appreciated.

Try:
 $ host www.google.com # watch how long this command takes
 $ IP=10.11.12.13 # make note of one of the IP addresses returned
 $ ping $IP # look at packet loss ratio
 $ traceroute $IP # look at latency

That should at least give you an idea of *which part* of "connecting
to the outside world" is bogging down.  Then, you can run a protocol
analyzer (like the infamous tcpdump) to see what's taking so long:

 # tcpdump -ni eth0 # -n supresses reverse-DNS lookup, which could be confusing

Interpreting the output for things like ping traffic is fairly easy.
For other traffic, you may need a modicum of knowledge about how the
(Continue reading)

Paul Lussier | 2 Apr 01:02 2007
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Re: IPv6 and IPv4 - how to shut off IPv6?


> Date: Sun, 01 Apr 2007 15:48:34 -0400
> From: Bruce Labitt <bruce.labitt@...>
>
>> outside world are excruciatingly slow.  (Connection to google takes 
>> minutes, other computers on the same network, seconds.)  I do know that 
>> my router does not like to pass through IPv6 info, so I am suspecting 
>> something like this.
>> 
>> Are there some tools I can use to determine what is actually happening?  
>> Firewall or traffic analysis?  If someone could show some sort usage it 
>> would be greatly appreciated.

Have you tried the simple things first, like checking that
/etc/resolv.conf is set up correctly, and /etc/nsswitch.conf?

Check top and see what's running.  Is there something eating your
bandwidth, like a torrent download set off by Myth?

And, have you tried just resetting the firewall?

A diagram of the setup might help too... And check that the Myth box
isn't running iptables or something that could be interfering.
--

-- 
Seeya,
Paul
--
Key fingerprint = 1660 FECC 5D21 D286 F853  E808 BB07 9239 53F1 28EE

A: Yes.                                                               
(Continue reading)

Bruce Labitt | 2 Apr 01:36 2007
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Re: IPv6 and IPv4 - how to shut off IPv6?

Paul Lussier wrote:
>> Date: Sun, 01 Apr 2007 15:48:34 -0400
>> From: Bruce Labitt <bruce.labitt@...>
>>
>>     
>>> outside world are excruciatingly slow.  (Connection to google takes 
>>> minutes, other computers on the same network, seconds.)  I do know that 
>>> my router does not like to pass through IPv6 info, so I am suspecting 
>>> something like this.
>>>
>>> Are there some tools I can use to determine what is actually happening?  
>>> Firewall or traffic analysis?  If someone could show some sort usage it 
>>> would be greatly appreciated.
>>>       
>
> Have you tried the simple things first, like checking that
> /etc/resolv.conf is set up correctly, and /etc/nsswitch.conf?
>
> Check top and see what's running.  Is there something eating your
> bandwidth, like a torrent download set off by Myth?
>
> And, have you tried just resetting the firewall?
>
> A diagram of the setup might help too... And check that the Myth box
> isn't running iptables or something that could be interfering.
>   
Paul,

Thanks for responding.

(Continue reading)

Paul Lussier | 2 Apr 02:06 2007
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Re: IPv6 and IPv4 - how to shut off IPv6?

Bruce Labitt <bruce.labitt@...> writes:

> Paul,
>
> Thanks for responding.
>
> resolv.conf looks benign.
>
> ; generated by /sbin/dhclient-script
> nameserver 192.168.1.1
> search localdomain

Interesting, mine looks like this:

  search hsd1.ma.comcast.net.
  nameserver 24.34.240.9
  nameserver 24.34.241.9
  nameserver 68.87.64.196

The 'search localdomain' doesn't look right to me.  What is acting as
your DHCP server?

> It says to look to files for ethers, netmasks, protocols, and
> networks.  I don't know where the particular "files" are, so I can't
> comment on whether they contain the right information.

'files' means the files in /etc.

> top indicates that there is nothing eating cpu time.

(Continue reading)

Bruce Labitt | 2 Apr 03:17 2007
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Re: IPv6 and IPv4 - how to shut off IPv6?

Paul Lussier wrote:
> Bruce Labitt <bruce.labitt@...> writes:
>
>   
>> Paul,
>>
>> Thanks for responding.
>>
>> resolv.conf looks benign.
>>
>> ; generated by /sbin/dhclient-script
>> nameserver 192.168.1.1
>> search localdomain
>>     
>
> Interesting, mine looks like this:
>
>   search hsd1.ma.comcast.net.
>   nameserver 24.34.240.9
>   nameserver 24.34.241.9
>   nameserver 68.87.64.196
>
> The 'search localdomain' doesn't look right to me.  What is acting as
> your DHCP server?
>
>   
My router.  It automatically gets the nameservers from my isp.  It seems 
to works ok for my two SuSE 9.3 boxes.
>> It says to look to files for ethers, netmasks, protocols, and
>> networks.  I don't know where the particular "files" are, so I can't
(Continue reading)


Gmane