Ted Roche | 1 Aug 03:14 2006

Plug for a local book store: QuantumPlus

Quantum books bought out the old Softpro storefront in Waltham and  
continues to sell a fair representation of computer books. They've  
got a sale going on now through August 12 that gives a 30% discount  
on selected books if you sign up for their mailing list.

Bear in mind you'll pay a 5% sales tax, but you'll be supporting a  
local retailer. If you've got a specific book in mind, you may want  
to call ahead, as their selection is a bit smaller, but they're happy  
to do custom orders.

http://www.quantumbooks.com

Ted Roche
Ted Roche & Associates, LLC
http://www.tedroche.com
Ted Roche | 1 Aug 03:31 2006

Re: Malware "best practices"

On Jul 27, 2006, at 7:11 PM, Jason Stephenson wrote:

> As a programmer, I can tell you why. Most programmers are not well  
> versed in the art or the science (if there really is any) of  
> programming.

There is a pretty large body of "Computer Science." Witness the ACM's  
Library or CS programs at MIT, Berkeley or CMU. However, we have an  
industry that needs 5% scientists and 95% practitioners at levels  
from architect through designer, planner, manager, tester and coder.  
Everyone on the assembly line at GM doesn't need a PhD in "Automotive  
Science" but they need well-designed tools and to follow a grand  
scheme they may only see a little piece of.

> Do you know why? Most programmers don't really get to see that much  
> source code. It's true. In the commercial realm of closed source  
> software most programmers only get to see the code of the project 
> (s) to which they are assigned. They never get to see much code  
> that's better or worse than what they are used to seeing.

True.

> The same is true in most university CS programs. Students are not  
> exposed to all that much code. It's mostly theory and mathematics  
> and then applying that theory and mathematics in code.

The "back page" opinion piece in last month's Communications of the  
ACM voices this same thought - stop having students write "toy"  
projects.

(Continue reading)

Ted Roche | 1 Aug 03:46 2006

CentraLUG, NEW LOCATION, August 7th (next Monday). Open Mike! CDs! Ubuntu! Stickers!

The August 7th meeting of the Central New Hampshire Linux User Group  
will be held at a NEW LOCATION: the Hopkinton Town Library, 61  
Houston Drive, Contoocook, NH. It's a picturesque location with  
plenty of space, power, wired Ethernet, kitchen facilities and more.  
(Sorry, no alcoholic beverages) With luck, air conditioning this  
time, too!

DIRECTIONS: From I-89: Exit 6. From the south: right at the end of  
the ramp. From the north, left. Proceed 2 miles to Fountain Square,  
stop sign. Left at the sign, over the stone bridge. Left/straight at  
the fork immediately after the bridge; note that oncoming traffic has  
the right of way (the ambulance is conveniently located across the  
street should you forget). Left onto Pine Street in 60 feet. Library  
entrance is on the right a few hundred yards up the road. Feel free  
to double-check these directions with Google:

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=61+Houston+Drive,+Contoocook, 
+NH&ie=UTF8&om=1

Same day as usual: First Monday, August 7th Time: 7 PM to 9 PM

Topic: Open Mike: Linux and FOSS Questions and Answers. Bring your  
troublesome computer questions. Want to get FOSS into your school  
system? Into your work? Let's discuss. Interested in future topics?  
Fall planning: CentraLUG needs a new home. Ideas welcomed.

I have a batch of Ubuntu Dapper Drake 6.06 LTS disks: 8 Intel x86, 1  
64-bit x86, 1 Mac PowerPC. If you've got a slow download connection,  
here's a chance to pick up a disk for FREE! Also, a dozen stickers of  
"ubuntu: linux for human beings" to decorate your laptop, car or  
(Continue reading)

Bill McGonigle | 1 Aug 08:14 2006

Reminder: DLSLUG Monthly Meeting - August 3rd

***************************************************************
            Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee Linux Users Group
                    http://www.dlslug.org/
***************************************************************

The next regular monthly meeting of the DLSLUG will be held:
                  Thursday, August 3rd, 7-9PM
at:         Dartmouth College, Carson Hall, Room L02
                 All are welcome, free of charge.

                             Agenda

7:00  Sign-in, networking

7:15  Introductory remarks

7:20  "Taking Open Source, Enterprise-Class applications
        off the desktop and into the Field"

        Presented by Thomas Hall
            Technical Account Manager, Wind River System

        There are many compelling reasons to adopt Open Source
	   applications for the desktop; one asks... Why stop there?
        Well, turns out there are significant technical hurdles to
        overcome minimal resources - successfully scaling powerful
        Open Source applications like Apache and MySQL into a
        handheld device requires Linux development and testing
        tools well beyond printf.

(Continue reading)

Jonathan Linowes | 1 Aug 08:34 2006

php5 presentation

Interesting link



Jonathan





Neil Joseph Schelly | 1 Aug 15:56 2006

Re: Plug for a local book store: QuantumPlus

I just bought a new set of  OpenBSD discs there last week and picked up an 
O'Reilly book while I was there.  I got refreshments, a free O'Reilly shirt, 
and a frequent buyer card for O'Reilly books (buy 5, get one 1 free).  Very 
cool store that I'll be back to, even if it weren't about 20% off every tech 
book you might look for.
-N

On Monday 31 July 2006 09:14 pm, Ted Roche wrote:
> Quantum books bought out the old Softpro storefront in Waltham and
> continues to sell a fair representation of computer books. They've
> got a sale going on now through August 12 that gives a 30% discount
> on selected books if you sign up for their mailing list.
>
> Bear in mind you'll pay a 5% sales tax, but you'll be supporting a
> local retailer. If you've got a specific book in mind, you may want
> to call ahead, as their selection is a bit smaller, but they're happy
> to do custom orders.
>
> http://www.quantumbooks.com
>
>
> Ted Roche
> Ted Roche & Associates, LLC
> http://www.tedroche.com
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> gnhlug-discuss mailing list
> gnhlug-discuss@...
> http://mail.gnhlug.org/mailman/listinfo/gnhlug-discuss
Pierre B | 1 Aug 18:11 2006
Picon

Fwd: [FreecycleManchesterNH] OFFER: Computer system

This was posted on Freecycle, if anyone is interested in a big toy.
 
pierre

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: James Fogg <james-bxqr21Bq40nQT0dZR+AlfA@public.gmane.org>
Date: Jul 31, 2006 3:35 PM
Subject: [FreecycleManchesterNH] OFFER: Computer system
To: FreecycleManchesterNH-hHKSG33TihhbjbujkaE4pw@public.gmane.org

 

Before you get excited, please understand this machine runs the Solaris
Unix operating system. It may also run Linux. It will not run Windows
(ever). It is also large (5 feet tall, 23 inches wide, 28 inches deep).

I have a Sun 690-MP available, with it's native chassis (modified 19in
rack with custom covers).

The 690-MP was Sun's first true Datacenter SMP machine, and it's a 32bit
SPARC architecture.

Memory exists, but quantity is unknown. Two disk trays full of disks of
unknown capacity come with the system. 2 CPU cards come with the system,
but no CPU's. I have a pair of SM85's I'd donate to make it useful.
Parts are available, often for free. Fully configured, you can put 16
processors in this machine.

It can run on 110 volts, single phase (house outlet). I'd recommend a
lightly used 20 amp circuit.

Pickup truck, minivan or trailer needed for pickup. Or you can bring 6
men with you and we'll strap it to the roof of your car (not responsible
for dents in roof). It's located in my cellar, but we have a "drive
through" cellar so no stairs are involved. If you have stairs at its
destination it can be disassembled into component chassis and moved with
two men.

Alternatively, I have an open utility trailer and a truck to tow with.
If we can find a *dry* day we can move it on the trailer.

Reply if interested.

__._,_.___
***There have been a lot of posts asking for references for local companies lately. To be fair and keep with the guidelines, please only request a reference if you also have something tangible to offer. Posts that do not include an offer with a request will be deleted.***

MANCHESTER, NH FREECYCLE(TM) RULES & ETIQUETTE:
1) Keep it free, Legal & Appropriate for all ages 2) Your first post must be an offer 3) Subject line includes - OFFER: TAKEN: WANTED: SUBJECT: and LOCATION 4) Please do not post the same "WANTED" posting more than once a week 5) NO politics, spam, money, personal attacks/rudeness 6) Post your approximate location 7) Keep it all in one e-mail 8) No pets 9) No trading 10) Responses go only to the member offering, not to the entire board

 


--
Stranger Than Fiction. Improvisation. New Hampshire. www.strangerthanfiction.us
--
In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame, two is a law firm, and three or more is a congress. - John
Adams
Tom Buskey | 1 Aug 19:18 2006

Fwd: [FreecycleManchesterNH] OFFER: Sun Computer system

The group is all about recycling.  Someone here might have interest.



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: James Fogg < james-bxqr21Bq40nQT0dZR+AlfA@public.gmane.org>
Date: Jul 31, 2006 3:35 PM
Subject: [FreecycleManchesterNH] OFFER: Computer system
To: FreecycleManchesterNH-hHKSG33TihhbjbujkaE4pw@public.gmane.org

 

Before you get excited, please understand this machine runs the Solaris
Unix operating system. It may also run Linux. It will not run Windows
(ever). It is also large (5 feet tall, 23 inches wide, 28 inches deep).

I have a Sun 690-MP available, with it's native chassis (modified 19in
rack with custom covers).

The 690-MP was Sun's first true Datacenter SMP machine, and it's a 32bit
SPARC architecture.

Memory exists, but quantity is unknown. Two disk trays full of disks of
unknown capacity come with the system. 2 CPU cards come with the system,
but no CPU's. I have a pair of SM85's I'd donate to make it useful.
Parts are available, often for free. Fully configured, you can put 16
processors in this machine.

It can run on 110 volts, single phase (house outlet). I'd recommend a
lightly used 20 amp circuit.

Pickup truck, minivan or trailer needed for pickup. Or you can bring 6
men with you and we'll strap it to the roof of your car (not responsible
for dents in roof). It's located in my cellar, but we have a "drive
through" cellar so no stairs are involved. If you have stairs at its
destination it can be disassembled into component chassis and moved with
two men.

Alternatively, I have an open utility trailer and a truck to tow with.
If we can find a *dry* day we can move it on the trailer.

Reply if interested.

__._,_.___
***There have been a lot of posts asking for references for local companies lately. To be fair and keep with the guidelines, please only request a reference if you also have something tangible to offer. Posts that do not include an offer with a request will be deleted.***

MANCHESTER, NH FREECYCLE(TM) RULES & ETIQUETTE:
1) Keep it free, Legal & Appropriate for all ages 2) Your first post must be an offer 3) Subject line includes - OFFER: TAKEN: WANTED: SUBJECT: and LOCATION 4) Please do not post the same "WANTED" posting more than once a week 5) NO politics, spam, money, personal attacks/rudeness 6) Post your approximate location 7) Keep it all in one e-mail 8) No pets 9) No trading 10) Responses go only to the member offering, not to the entire board

 


--
Stranger Than Fiction. Improvisation. New Hampshire. www.strangerthanfiction.us
--
In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame, two is a law firm, and three or more is a congress. - John
Adams
Bill Sconce | 1 Aug 19:47 2006
X-Face

Re: Malware "best practices"

On Thu, 27 Jul 2006 19:11:39 -0400
Jason Stephenson <jason@...> wrote:

> As a programmer, I can tell you why. Most programmers are not
> well versed in the art or the science (if there really is any)
> of programming.

In a beautiful paper, "Hackers and Painters" [1] Paul Graham [2] says:
    ...
    I've never liked the term "computer science." The main reason
    I don't like it is that there's no such thing. 

    Computer science is a grab bag of tenuously related areas thrown 
    together by an accident of history, like Yugoslavia. At one end you 
    have people who are really mathematicians, but call what they're
    doing computer science so they can get DARPA grants. ... It's as if
    mathematicians, physicists, and architects all had to be in the 
    same department.
    ...
    But for the hackers this label is a problem. If what they're doing
    is called science, it makes them feel they ought to be acting 
    scientific. So instead of doing what they really want to do, which
    is to design beautiful software, hackers in universities and 
    research labs feel they ought to be writing research papers.

    In the best case, the papers are just a formality. Hackers write
    cool software, and then write a paper about it, and the paper becomes
    a proxy for the achievement represented by the software. But often
    this mismatch causes problems. It's easy to drift away from building
    beautiful things toward building ugly things that make more suitable
    subjects for research papers.

    Unfortunately, beautiful things don't always make the best subjects
    for papers. Number one, research must be original-- and as anyone who
    has written a PhD dissertation knows, the way to be sure that you're
    exploring virgin territory is to to stake out a piece of ground that
    no one wants. Number two, research must be substantial-- and awkward
    systems yield meatier papers, because you can write about the obstacles
    you have to overcome in order to get things done. Nothing yields meaty
    problems like starting with the wrong assumptions. Most of AI is an
    example of this rule ...

-Bill

[1] At
    http://www.paulgraham.com/hp.html

[2] My thanks to Ted Roche for introducing me to Paul Graham's writing.
Ben Scott | 1 Aug 20:01 2006
Picon

Re: Malware "best practices"

On 8/1/06, Bill Sconce <sconce@...> wrote:
>     I've never liked the term "computer science." The main reason
>     I don't like it is that there's no such thing.

  If it does exist, it certainly isn't practiced very often.

  Myself, I prefer the term "computer engineering" for what system
admins and practical software developers should do.  The difference
between "science" and "engineering" is a subtle one, to be sure, but I
suspect you'll get what I mean.  A key point is the concept of
approaching things with a mind towards repeatability, reliability,
standardization, understanding, and so on.  Rather then just throwing
things together, as seems to be more common.

  Debating the merits and semantics of more research-oriented
activities (like AI) I ain't gonna touch with a jumbo Ethernet frame.
:-)

> [2] My thanks to Ted Roche for introducing me to Paul Graham's writing.

  I still haven't put a tuit towards reading that paper.... *sigh*

-- Ben

Gmane