Stephen Gutknecht (hilltx | 1 Dec 18:22 2008

December 11 & 18 - newer 802.11n routers, Linux dd-wrt openwrt

If there are no conflicts for other presentations, I'm suggesting now
is a good time to have some workshops on putting open source firmware
on many of the consumer routers.

The LinkSys WRT-54GL and previous versions of that router were
mainstream for years... but G radio is pretty weak by today's
standard;  The new N routers are not just about faster signal, but the
real benefit is often the better antenna MIMO signal designs.

With many routers, two or more can act as wireless repeaters (WDS
mode) allowing you to reach areas with wired or wireless.  It is also
possible to connect two routers back to back with Ethernet cable and
share out an existing WiFi connection with a new name and signal.

December 11, I will bring two Linksys WRT-310N routers with dd-wrt
loaded and discuss the loading process, features, and .  This is a
well supported Linux router available at Buy.com, Newegg, Amazon and
so forth for around $85 (also goes on sale at times for lower).  This
is a Broadcom based router with 32MB of RAM for running Linux - allows
you a lot of flexibility in what services it can perform for your
network.  It is a little more expensive model given it is also a
gigabit switch for the cabled side of the network.

  NOTE:  If you are considering the purchase of this router (Linksys
WRT310), consider that the reviews often reflect the poor quality of
the firmware that comes from the factory - using open source dd-wrt is
the cure to many of the network (NAT) related issues.  The hardware on
this router is not perfect, it can overheat if not adequately
ventilated - putting it on top of a cable modem or other warm device
would be a bad choice.  However, it is good value and quality - but
(Continue reading)

Don Davis | 2 Dec 00:22 2008

Re: December 11 & 18 - newer 802.11n routers, Linux dd-wrt openwrt


> December 11, I will bring two Linksys WRT-310N 

I was glad to hear about these.  I'll have to research them.  I've been 
using wrt54gls.  I'll have to check to see how hackable they are.

> Feel free to bring your router to the meeting, we can try to flash it
> with dd-wrt or review your options.  I also have a Linksys WRT54G I
> will bring to the meeting, although I no longer recommend this router
> given the weaker radio signal of the G radio.  If there is any desire,
> we can flash OpenWRT on this router as an alternate to dd-wrt.

You might want X-wrt (it's OpenWRT with a graphical interface).  OpenWRT 
White Russian is pretty standard command line stuff for Linux, but 
Kamikaze is a a little different (I'm thinking of the UCI stuff).
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Thomas King | 2 Dec 20:18 2008

D-Bus article

This is a pretty decent article for a nuts-and-bolts explanation of D-Bus.
http://foss-boss.blogspot.com/2008/11/ride-d-bus-control-your-linux-desktop.html

Tom King
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john_re | 3 Dec 13:06 2008
Picon

BerkeleyTIP Great progress VOIP November - Dec 6 = Improve VOIP

We made GREAT progress with the November 1 meeting! :)  I really can't
believe how happy I am about it, & how far we advanced.

We went from in September having no online attendees,
to in October having 1 person remote on IRC, to in
November having 7 people around the US all in a VOIP conference!  It was
_fantastic_!  I was very impressed.  

I'm especially impressed with our online members, who basically took the
info I had in the VOIP data page, & found a conference #, set up a
conference, & got logged in, all while I was taking a short break!  :)

Besides two of us on VOIP in Berkeley, we had Oakland, San Fran, San
Jose, Washington state, & North Carolina.  Plus we had at least two
other person on IRC who didn't have time to get on VOIP.

It was so very enjoyable talking & listening to the guy in North
Carolina - he had a _very_ strong southern accent, & I _rarely_ get to
talk with someone with that accent.  It was so fun knowing I was
listening to someone who was _unmistakeably_ _not_ from the BayArea!

We had a UCB student join us on IRC from one of the dorms - he'd seen
the announcement I sent on the UCB SciPy list.

This is all doubly exciting, because I _still_ didn't even get the
announcements out until less than 24 hours before hand. Think how many
more people might see the announcement in time to join us if I get it
out 1 or two weeks ahead of time!

Good progress is me getting _this_ announcement out about 3 weeks
(Continue reading)

chris | 5 Dec 23:12 2008
Picon

filesystem math

I just installed a 400GB SATA drive in a box running Opensuse 10.3. I
used the partitioner tool from YaST to format it as one single ext3
partition. After this completed, I did df -h and got the following
result for it:

Size    Used    Avail    Use%
367G   195M   348G    1%

I know some space has to be kept for the journal, but it still seems
like 19GB has gone *poof*. Is this normal?

-Chris
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Thomas King | 6 Dec 00:25 2008

Local charity raffle

A local Linux charity is having a raffle for a computer as first prize, and
other odds and ends for runner ups.
http://linuxlock.blogspot.com/2008/11/new-computer-prize-draws-linux-fans-to.html

Tom King
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Shane Williams | 6 Dec 00:31 2008
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Re: filesystem math

The problem is likely drive vendor math.  Many (maybe most) drive
vendors these days express GB in billions of bytes, so what you have
is a 400,000,000,000 Byte drive (check the box the drive came in, and I
bet you'll find an asterisk or some very fine print that tells you
this). Divide that by (1024^3) and you actually get 372GB.  Take away
space for a journal, and surprise, you're at 367G

On Fri, 5 Dec 2008, chris wrote:

> I just installed a 400GB SATA drive in a box running Opensuse 10.3. I
> used the partitioner tool from YaST to format it as one single ext3
> partition. After this completed, I did df -h and got the following
> result for it:
>
> Size    Used    Avail    Use%
> 367G   195M   348G    1%
>
> I know some space has to be kept for the journal, but it still seems
> like 19GB has gone *poof*. Is this normal?
>
> -Chris
> _______________________________________________
> ALG Mailing List http://austinlug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/alg
>

--

-- 
Public key #7BBC68D9 at            |                 Shane Williams
http://pgp.mit.edu/                |      System Admin - UT iSchool
=----------------------------------+-------------------------------
All syllogisms contain three lines |              shanew@...
(Continue reading)

H D Moore | 6 Dec 00:41 2008

Re: filesystem math

On Friday 05 December 2008, Shane Williams wrote:
> Take away space for a journal, and surprise, you're at 367G

The suprise he means is that the drive says its 367G, 150M are used, but 
only 348G are available. Seems weird to me too.

-HD

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Michael Burek | 6 Dec 00:46 2008

Re: filesystem math

I almost replied the same thing.  But that's not what he's questioning.

Your right about the difference in 1000 vs 1024.  But that's why the size is reported as 367GB, and not 400GB.
But the 19GB he's missing is between the 367 GB capacity and the 348 GB available.  The Used should be 19GB, or the available should be closer to 367GB.
Those are the numbers that don't add up.


On Fri, Dec 5, 2008 at 5:31 PM, Shane Williams <shanew-q0/GUbE2lDisTnJN9+BGXg@public.gmane.org> wrote:
The problem is likely drive vendor math.  Many (maybe most) drive
vendors these days express GB in billions of bytes, so what you have
is a 400,000,000,000 Byte drive (check the box the drive came in, and I
bet you'll find an asterisk or some very fine print that tells you
this). Divide that by (1024^3) and you actually get 372GB.  Take away
space for a journal, and surprise, you're at 367G


On Fri, 5 Dec 2008, chris wrote:

> I just installed a 400GB SATA drive in a box running Opensuse 10.3. I
> used the partitioner tool from YaST to format it as one single ext3
> partition. After this completed, I did df -h and got the following
> result for it:
>
> Size    Used    Avail    Use%
> 367G   195M   348G    1%
>
> I know some space has to be kept for the journal, but it still seems
> like 19GB has gone *poof*. Is this normal?
>
> -Chris
> _______________________________________________
> ALG Mailing List http://austinlug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/alg
>

--
Public key #7BBC68D9 at            |                 Shane Williams
http://pgp.mit.edu/                |      System Admin - UT iSchool
=----------------------------------+-------------------------------
All syllogisms contain three lines |              shanew-q0/GUbE2lDisTnJN9+BGXg@public.gmane.org
Therefore this is not a syllogism  | www.ischool.utexas.edu/~shanew
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George Goodyear | 6 Dec 00:59 2008
Picon
Picon

Re: filesystem math

Been there and done that and got the T shirt, and I don't understand why either. But if you check the size in the bios settings you will see it (367 GB) is there.

Carlos

Michael Burek wrote:
I almost replied the same thing.  But that's not what he's questioning.

Your right about the difference in 1000 vs 1024.  But that's why the size is reported as 367GB, and not 400GB.
But the 19GB he's missing is between the 367 GB capacity and the 348 GB available.  The Used should be 19GB, or the available should be closer to 367GB.
Those are the numbers that don't add up.


On Fri, Dec 5, 2008 at 5:31 PM, Shane Williams <shanew-q0/GUbE2lDisTnJN9+BGXg@public.gmane.org> wrote:
The problem is likely drive vendor math.  Many (maybe most) drive
vendors these days express GB in billions of bytes, so what you have
is a 400,000,000,000 Byte drive (check the box the drive came in, and I
bet you'll find an asterisk or some very fine print that tells you
this). Divide that by (1024^3) and you actually get 372GB.  Take away
space for a journal, and surprise, you're at 367G


On Fri, 5 Dec 2008, chris wrote:

> I just installed a 400GB SATA drive in a box running Opensuse 10.3. I
> used the partitioner tool from YaST to format it as one single ext3
> partition. After this completed, I did df -h and got the following
> result for it:
>
> Size    Used    Avail    Use%
> 367G   195M   348G    1%
>
> I know some space has to be kept for the journal, but it still seems
> like 19GB has gone *poof*. Is this normal?
>
> -Chris
> _______________________________________________
> ALG Mailing List http://austinlug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/alg
>

--
Public key #7BBC68D9 at            |                 Shane Williams
http://pgp.mit.edu/                |      System Admin - UT iSchool
=----------------------------------+-------------------------------
All syllogisms contain three lines |              shanew-q0/GUbE2lDisTnJN9+BGXg@public.gmane.org
Therefore this is not a syllogism  | www.ischool.utexas.edu/~shanew
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