Jim Parkhurst | 2 Aug 06:44 2008
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Re: Administrative Note: Auto Responders

8-)   Thanks!

Carl Perry wrote:
> Greetings from your Friendly Mailing List Administrator -
>
> I usually don't put my foot down when it comes to mailing list
> netiquette stuff, but there have been a rash of auto-responders hitting
> the list participants of recent.
>
> I completely understand vacation notification auto-responders.  However,
> the current rash have been anti-spam ones that don't even adhere to RFC
> specifications.
>
> So: here's the foot coming down.  If you have one of these anti-spam
> auto-responders on your mail account, add an exception rule for alg or
> risk being administratively blocked from the list.
>
> If you see an auto-responder being stupid (especially if it's in a
> foreign language), please forward the message to alg-admin@...
> or alg-technical-admin@... (depending on what list it sourced
> from) and I'll take care of it.
>
> Thanks for your time!
>   -Carl
>
>   
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> ALG-technical mailing list http://austinlug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/alg-technical
(Continue reading)

Jim Parkhurst | 7 Aug 16:36 2008
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Picon

Fwd: [opensuse-announce] Announcing Hack Week III


>>> "Joe 'Zonker' Brockmeier" <jzb@...> 08/07/2008 08:20 >>>
Novell is once again sponsoring Hack Week -- and we want you to be in
on it! Hack Week III (HW3) runs from August 25th through August 29th.

What's Hack Week? Hack Week is a chance for Novell's developers to
work on Innovation Time Off (ITO) projects, uninterrupted by normal
hacking duties. This helps provide an opportunity for Novell's
developers to work on innovative new projects they might not normally
be able to work on. Since most of the projects developed during Hack
Week are open source, this also benefits the community by providing
new code.

During Hack Week, developers can work on any project of interest. So
far Hack Week has spawned a number of impressive projects and
improvements, such as Debian package support in the openSUSE Build
Service, Tasque, Giver, and many others.

For HW3, we're encouraging members of the openSUSE community to get
involved as well, either by working on their own Hack Week projects,
or by collaborating with Novell developers to create or enhance open
source projects.

We are sponsoring travel for a limited number of contributors. If
you're interested in working on a project in person, please contact
Andreas Jaeger (aj@...) by August 12th. We will also be announcing
ways for community contributors to participate in Hack Week III
remotely, stay tuned to news.opensuse.org and opensuse-announce for
details.

(Continue reading)

Robert Parkhurst | 15 Aug 00:09 2008
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off topic: MIPS Pro

Hey guys,

Does anyone remember using MIPS Pro?  I finally got an Origin 200 up and running (it was an old developer system and has been in the storage room for a while).  Anyway, it's got a fully licensed version of MIPS Pro on it and I was curious if anyone had ever used it and if so, what they're thoughts on it are?



Robert
<div><div dir="ltr">Hey guys,<br><br>Does anyone remember using MIPS Pro?&nbsp; I finally got an Origin 200 up and running (it was an old developer system and has been in the storage room for a while).&nbsp; Anyway, it's got a fully licensed version of MIPS Pro on it and I was curious if anyone had ever used it and if so, what they're thoughts on it are?<br><br><br><br>Robert<br>
</div></div>
Paul Elliott | 15 Aug 04:59 2008
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When will Grandma be ready for Linux? Presentation August 28th.

John Terpstra, a Linux developer with a long and interesting history
in the field, and a perspective on the past and future course of
Linux. He is perhaps best known as the co-founder of the Samba
project, and has written a couple of books on it. He is willing to
speak to us on the topic of When will Grandma be ready for Linux?

The presentation will occur at the regular ALG meeting on August 28 at:
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&amp;hl=en&amp;q=625+E+10th+St,+Austin+TX
Google map of how to get to 625E 10th St, Austin TX

-- 
Paul Elliott                       1(512)837-1096
pelliott@...                    PMB 181, 11900 Metric Blvd Suite J
http://www.io.com/~pelliott/pme/   Austin TX 78758-3117
John Terpstra, a Linux developer with a long and interesting history
in the field, and a perspective on the past and future course of
Linux. He is perhaps best known as the co-founder of the Samba
project, and has written a couple of books on it. He is willing to
speak to us on the topic of When will Grandma be ready for Linux?

The presentation will occur at the regular ALG meeting on August 28 at:
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&amp;hl=en&amp;q=625+E+10th+St,+Austin+TX
Google map of how to get to 625E 10th St, Austin TX

--

-- 
Paul Elliott                       1(512)837-1096
pelliott@...                    PMB 181, 11900 Metric Blvd Suite J
http://www.io.com/~pelliott/pme/   Austin TX 78758-3117
Jim Parkhurst | 19 Aug 16:00 2008
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Picon

Fwd: [security-announce] SUSE Linux 10.1 has reached End of Life


>>> Marcus Meissner <meissner@...> 08/19/2008 06:47 >>>
Hi,

With the release of an mysql security fix on August 13 we have released
the last update for SUSE Linux 10.1. (Actually 10.1 was discontinued on
May 31st, but the queue took a bit longer to flush from all updates.)

It is now officially discontinued and out of support.

SUSE Linux 10.1 was released May 2006 and was the base of SUSE Linux
Enterprise 10 line of products.

It featured a new package management stack, which had problems in the
beginning and throughout its lifetime, but which in the next openSUSE
releases has evolved to be the fastest and most feature rich available
package management system.

Some statistics on the released patches:

Total:			663 	( -3)
	Security:	486  	(-43)
	Recommended:	168 	(+44)
	Optional:	  9 	( -4)

Top issues (compared to 10.0 for some issues):
     15 clamav			(-2)
     14 MozillaFirefox		(+2)
     12 seamonkey		(+6)
     12 opera			( 0)
     10 cups			(+3)
      9 MozillaThunderbird	(+1)
      8 timezone		(+3)
      8 java-1_5_0-sun		(+1)
      8 ImageMagick		( 0)
      7 OpenOffice_org		( 0)
      7 krb5			(+2)
      6 squirrelmail		(-2)
      6 phpMyAdmin		(-2)
      6 kernel			(-3)
      6 ethereal		(-2)
      6 bind			(+1)
      6 asterisk		(new)
      6 php5			(-6)
      6 xine-lib		( 0)
      5 qt3			(-1)
      5 openssh			(-1)
      5 lighttpd		(new)
      5 kdepim3			(new)
      5 flash-player		(new)
      5 acroread		(new)
      4 xorg-x11-server		(-4)
	... rest 4 and lower cut ...

Ciao, Marcus

Attachment (Part.001): application/octet-stream, 665 bytes

>>> Marcus Meissner <meissner@...> 08/19/2008 06:47 >>>
Hi,

With the release of an mysql security fix on August 13 we have released
the last update for SUSE Linux 10.1. (Actually 10.1 was discontinued on
May 31st, but the queue took a bit longer to flush from all updates.)

It is now officially discontinued and out of support.

SUSE Linux 10.1 was released May 2006 and was the base of SUSE Linux
Enterprise 10 line of products.

It featured a new package management stack, which had problems in the
beginning and throughout its lifetime, but which in the next openSUSE
releases has evolved to be the fastest and most feature rich available
package management system.

Some statistics on the released patches:

Total:			663 	( -3)
	Security:	486  	(-43)
	Recommended:	168 	(+44)
	Optional:	  9 	( -4)

Top issues (compared to 10.0 for some issues):
     15 clamav			(-2)
     14 MozillaFirefox		(+2)
     12 seamonkey		(+6)
     12 opera			( 0)
     10 cups			(+3)
      9 MozillaThunderbird	(+1)
      8 timezone		(+3)
      8 java-1_5_0-sun		(+1)
      8 ImageMagick		( 0)
      7 OpenOffice_org		( 0)
      7 krb5			(+2)
      6 squirrelmail		(-2)
      6 phpMyAdmin		(-2)
      6 kernel			(-3)
      6 ethereal		(-2)
      6 bind			(+1)
      6 asterisk		(new)
      6 php5			(-6)
      6 xine-lib		( 0)
      5 qt3			(-1)
      5 openssh			(-1)
      5 lighttpd		(new)
      5 kdepim3			(new)
      5 flash-player		(new)
      5 acroread		(new)
      4 xorg-x11-server		(-4)
	... rest 4 and lower cut ...

Ciao, Marcus

Mark R Ward | 19 Aug 16:02 2008

Mark R Ward/GIS/CSC is out of the office.


I will be out of the office starting  08/19/2008 and will not return until
08/20/2008.

I will be out the office on Tuesday, August 19th, 2008, please contact Tom
Borland in my absence if you need help.

Robert Parkhurst | 20 Aug 04:51 2008
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sg question

I've been reading about how to manipulate SCSI tape drives/media changers and came across some information about Linux and SCSI generic (i.e. /dev/sgX).  I think it was from the mt or mtx manpage that said that Linux SCSI generic drivers go from /dev/sg0 to /dev/sg15 (giving you a total of 16 generic devices).

Is this true?  If so, what happens when linux hits a 17th device?  This seems like it would be a pretty big limitation since every SCSI device is also mapped to a SCSI generic device (i.e. /dev/sda is also /dev/sg0).


Thanks for any help!


Robert
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Robert Parkhurst | 25 Aug 15:45 2008
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firefox memory usage

I've been watching Firefox on my system for about a week now (version 3.0.1) and have noticed that it can eat memory..  For example, right now I've got a single window open with 4 tabs and I'm consuming 93MB RAM.  It's gotten as high as 380 MB I think, but typical range is between 170-180MB.  Of course, when I do this I typically have something like 4 windows open, each with about 10-15 tabs in it.

I'm curious about how this compares with other browsers, namely IE 6/7?


Thanks,


Robert
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Carl Perry | 25 Aug 19:54 2008
Picon

Re: firefox memory usage

Basically, it's better than IE6/7.  It's hard to track, because IE is so
tightly coupled with the OS, but there are a few studies out there:

http://blog.pavlov.net/2008/03/11/firefox-3-memory-usage/
http://ejohn.org/blog/firefox-3-memory-use/

One of the major goals of FF3 was to reduce memory footprint.  They did
a pretty good job in my book.  My FF3 instance is usually less than
300M, where as before it was idling around 500M and spiking to over 1G.

Robert Parkhurst wrote:
> I've been watching Firefox on my system for about a week now (version
> 3.0.1) and have noticed that it can eat memory..  For example, right now
> I've got a single window open with 4 tabs and I'm consuming 93MB RAM. 
> It's gotten as high as 380 MB I think, but typical range is between
> 170-180MB.  Of course, when I do this I typically have something like 4
> windows open, each with about 10-15 tabs in it.
> 
> I'm curious about how this compares with other browsers, namely IE 6/7?

Basically, it's better than IE6/7.  It's hard to track, because IE is so
tightly coupled with the OS, but there are a few studies out there:

http://blog.pavlov.net/2008/03/11/firefox-3-memory-usage/
http://ejohn.org/blog/firefox-3-memory-use/

One of the major goals of FF3 was to reduce memory footprint.  They did
a pretty good job in my book.  My FF3 instance is usually less than
300M, where as before it was idling around 500M and spiking to over 1G.

Robert Parkhurst wrote:
> I've been watching Firefox on my system for about a week now (version
> 3.0.1) and have noticed that it can eat memory..  For example, right now
> I've got a single window open with 4 tabs and I'm consuming 93MB RAM. 
> It's gotten as high as 380 MB I think, but typical range is between
> 170-180MB.  Of course, when I do this I typically have something like 4
> windows open, each with about 10-15 tabs in it.
> 
> I'm curious about how this compares with other browsers, namely IE 6/7?

Brad Knowles | 25 Aug 20:11 2008

Re: firefox memory usage

Robert Parkhurst wrote:

> I've been watching Firefox on my system for about a week now (version 3.0.1)
> and have noticed that it can eat memory..  For example, right now I've got a
> single window open with 4 tabs and I'm consuming 93MB RAM.  It's gotten as
> high as 380 MB I think, but typical range is between 170-180MB.  Of course,
> when I do this I typically have something like 4 windows open, each with
> about 10-15 tabs in it.

One of the biggest improvements for Firefox 3 was the greatly improved 
memory handling.  Earlier versions of Firefox would leak memory like a 
sieve, and they have gone a very long way towards eliminating those problems 
with Firefox 3.

That said, it can keep a large in-memory cache.  I've recently rebooted, so 
I know I don't have a lot of cache loaded, and it's already up to 90MB real 
and 1GB virtual, but then we know many applications on MacOS X take up a lot 
more memory on this platform than others.

Of course, it helps me that the reason I recently rebooted was to upgrade my 
machine to 6GB of RAM, but even with just 2GB this wasn't a big deal.

--

-- 
Brad Knowles <brad@...>
LinkedIn Profile: <http://tinyurl.com/y8kpxu>
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