George Rosamond | 9 Feb 23:12 2016

[talk] Fwd: flashrd 2.0

FYI.

I mentioned flashrd at the installfest in January.  This is the first
release in a while.

Haven't touched the new one yet, but it's a nice light OpenBSD system
that even works well on ancient Soekris 4801s, with an easy upgrade method.

g

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: flashrd 2.0
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 13:20:50 -0800
From: Chris Cappuccio <chris <at> nmedia.net>
To: flashrd <at> lists.130collective.org

The mailing list moved to a new server. I don't have an MLM up, and
Fred Cirera can no longer host the list, so Tim Howe volunteered to
host it.

The new list address is:

flashrd <at> lists.130collective.org

In reference to the last message on the list,

http://lists.130collective.org/pipermail/flashrd/2015-October/000173.html

the latest flashrd is now ready for consumption.

(Continue reading)

Robert Menes | 9 Feb 20:52 2016
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Gravatar

[talk] Thompson shell port to modern *nix

Hey all,

I mentioned a port of Thompson shell at Ike's Shell-fu talk last week, so after digging around, I found the link to the project's site.

Here it is: http://v6shell.org/

AFAIK this is about as old school as old school gets. Have fun and kick it old school for a change. :)

--Robert

<div>
<p dir="ltr">Hey all,</p>
<p dir="ltr">I mentioned a port of Thompson shell at Ike's Shell-fu talk last week, so after digging around, I found the link to the project's site.</p>
<p dir="ltr">Here it is: <a href="http://v6shell.org/">http://v6shell.org/</a></p>
<p dir="ltr">AFAIK this is about as old school as old school gets. Have fun and kick it old school for a change. :)</p>
<p dir="ltr">--Robert</p>
</div>
George Rosamond | 5 Feb 21:35 2016

[talk] Tor Browser 5.5 for OpenBSD

Greetings all. Tor Browser 5.5 for OpenBSD/amd64 -current is completed.
 Here's our announce below:

TDP Announce for Tor Browser 5.5 for OpenBSD
20160205
The Tor BSD Diversity Project
https://torbsd.github.io/

The Tor BSD Diversity Project (TDP) is proud to announce the release of
Tor Browser (TB) version 5.5 for OpenBSD. Please note that this version
of TB remains in development mode, and is not meant to ensure strong
privacy, anonymity or security.

TDP (https://torbsd.github.io) is an effort to extend the use of the BSD
Unixes into the Tor ecosystem, from the desktop to the network.

The 5.5 version is the eighth Tor Browser release from TDP.

To install TB for OpenBSD, please see
http://mirrors.nycbug.org/pub/snapshots/packages/amd64/README-55.txt

TDP is focused on diversifying the Tor network, with TB being the
flagship project. Additional efforts are made to increase the number of
*BSD relays on the Tor network among other sub-projects.

TDP's source code repository resides at http://github.com/torbsd/

TDP is seeking funding to continue and extend its efforts. Please
contact us if interested in assisting TDP, allowing us to dedicate more
time to the project.

Brian Reynolds | 5 Feb 02:54 2016
Picon

[talk] Korn Shell Anecdote

Last night's Shell Fu meeting was a lot of fun.

It wasn't until I was out of the bar that I remembered an amusing Korn
shell story from years ago.  It involves a Microsoft presenter running
into reality at a Usenix LISA NT conference in Seattle.  I originally
thought I saw it on rec.humor.funny, but it turns out that the best
version of it that I could find is in the freebsd-chat archives at:

<https://docs.freebsd.org/cgi/getmsg.cgi?fetch=156953+0+archive/1998/freebsd-chat/19980823.freebsd-chat>

Apparently this has been confirmed be people who were there, and a
much shortened version even appears in the David Korn page at
wikipedia.  So it must be true.

--

-- 
Brian Reynolds                   | "It's just like flying a spaceship.
reynolds <at> panix.com               |  You push some buttons and see
https://www.panix.com/~reynolds/ |  what happens." -- Zapp Brannigan
NAR# 54438                       |  

George Rosamond | 4 Feb 22:27 2016

[talk] July meeting on Retro/LiteBSDs

One of our upcoming meetings is Brian C about RetroBSD and LiteBSD, two
of the smallest BSDs ported for microcontrollers based on the MIPS chip.
 For those not familiar, think the square root of a Raspberry Pi.

http://www.nycbug.org/index.cgi?action=view&id=10645

Both Retro and Lite are being actively developed, and the door is wide
open to contributions.

https://github.com/sergev/LiteBSD/wiki

http://www.retrobsd.org

https://github.com/RetroBSD/retrobsd

Both sites provide a list of supported hardware, and we hope that this
meeting extends the number of people hacking on these MIPS boards.

We may be looking into getting a discount code on the hardware.  On the
other hand, all of it is reasonably inexpensive.

For those looking to start contributing, or at least dipping their toes
in the water, it makes sense to download the images and clone the GitHub
repositories before the meeting.

Let us know of your experiences onlist.

g

George Rosamond | 3 Feb 16:08 2016

[talk] NYC*BUG Tonight: Isaac 'Ike' Levy on Shell-Fu

This meeting will be streamed:

http://www.nycbug.org/index.cgi?action=streaming

Tonight, February 3: shell-fu, Isaac (.ike) Levy
18:45, Stone Creek Bar & Lounge: 140 E 27th St

Abstract

shell-fu in 3 short talks

To say everything starts with the shell, is quite an understatement.
Portable shell programming does not have to be painful, exposing the raw
power of UNIX with shell can even be fun.

This talk is relevant for expert and novice alike, aimed at anyone who
uses UNIX systems.

Not the 'shell tricks' variety of talk, but a language discussion
focused on portability, and showing off how simple and profoundly
powerful portable shell can be.

We will cover:

    the 3 finger claw technique
    using atomic filesystem operations
    general shell-fu, input and variable handling

There is always something amazing to learn about sh(1).

Speaker Bio

Isaac (.ike) Levy is a crusty UNIX Hacker.

A long-time community contributor to the *BSD's, ike is obsessed with
high-availability and redundant networked servers systems, mostly
because he likes to sleep at night. Standing on the shoulders of giants,
his background includes partnering to run a Virtual Server ISP before
anyone called it a cloud, as well as having a long history building
internet-facing infrastructure with UNIX systems.

.ike has been a part of NYC*BUG since it was first launched in January
2004. He was a long-time member of the Lower East Side Mac Unix User
Group, and is still in denial that this group no longer exists. He has
spoken frequently on a number of UNIX and internet security topics at
various venues, particularly on the topic of FreeBSD's jail(8).

Pat McEvoy | 3 Feb 16:04 2016
Picon

[talk] Streaming tonight

Hey folks,
Have webcam, will travel. Tonight's 
 NYC*BUG: talk shell-fu" Isaac (.ike) Levy will be streamed. 

http://www.nycbug.org/index.cgi?action=streaming

Pat

Mark Saad | 3 Feb 04:04 2016

[talk] Papers We Love Presents : Bryan Cantrill on Jails & Solaris Zones

All
  The Papers we love series is presenting Bryan Cantrill on Jails & Solaris Zones;

Thursday, February 11, 2016 7:00 PM

http://www.meetup.com/papers-we-love/events/228110831/

I think we should all force Ike to go and ask lots of questions about Jails. :)

 -- Mark Saad mark.saad <at> ymail.com

Mark Saad | 3 Feb 03:11 2016

[talk] Boundary enterprise is going away , anyone have a replacement?

All
  I have been using boundary.com , now owned by bmc software, for ipfix/Netflow analysis and monitoring. Bmc
just announced they are shutting down the product next month and shifting to docker monitoring  (this
isn't a joke) . So what I am looking at for ipfix and Netflow analysis is flowtraq. flowtraq.com; does
anyone have any experience with it ? Nfsen works but would be hard to customize to my liking, we need more
ipfix data that nfsen is missing ; like end to end nat tracking and alerting . A few people have said that
riemann  http://riemann.io could work but I would have to roll a lot of my own tooling . 

So anyone have any advice? I want to track Netflow / ipfix data , tag the data with relevant metadata , develop
trends and provide some analysts of the trends. 

---
Mark Saad | mark.saad <at> ymail.com
George Rosamond | 2 Feb 16:39 2016

[talk] NYC*BUG Wednesday: Isaac Levy on 'Shell-Fu'

Upcoming meetings and events, including tomorrow's monthly meeting.

* February 3 "shell-fu" Isaac (.ike) Levy

* March 2 "Discussion of the Past and Future of PID 1 on BSD" Raul Cuza
     Raul's meeting is something of a reply to reaffirmation of the BSD
init/rc systems, in the face of systemd

* April 6 "Debugging with llvm" John Wolfe

* May 4 "Urchin: Putting an End to Sloppy Shell Code" Thomas Levine

* June 15 "Adventures in HardenedBSD" Shawn Webb
     Shawn will be coming up from Maryland for this meeting. Note the
date which was set as to not conflict with BSDCan

* July 6 "Meet the Smallest BSDs: RetroBSD and LiteBSD" Brian Callahan

* August 3 A *BSD Installfest
     This installfest will happen after HOPE, and is a great meeting to
publicize at HOPE. We should have fliers for this event at HOPE

* Sept 7 "Teaching FreeBSD" George Neville-Neil

Also note these other upcoming events:

* Tokyo, Japan: AsiaBSCon, March 10-13

* Ottawa, Canada: BSDCan, June 10-11
     with tutorials and the dev summit beforehand

* New York, NY: HOPE (Hackers on Planet Earth), July 22-24
     a great opportunity for more popular BSD-related presentations

************************

Feb 3: Isaac Levy on "shell-fu"
18:45, Stone Creek Bar & Lounge: 140 E 27th St

Abstract

shell-fu in 3 short talks

To say everything starts with the shell, is quite an understatement.
Portable shell programming does not have to be painful, exposing the raw
power of UNIX with shell can even be fun.

This talk is relevant for expert and novice alike, aimed at anyone who
uses UNIX systems.

Not the 'shell tricks' variety of talk, but a language discussion
focused on portability, and showing off how simple and profoundly
powerful portable shell can be.

We will cover:

    the 3 finger claw technique
    using atomic filesystem operations
    general shell-fu, input and variable handling

There is always something amazing to learn about sh(1).

Speaker Bio

Isaac (.ike) Levy is a crusty UNIX Hacker.

A long-time community contributor to the *BSD's, ike is obsessed with
high-availability and redundant networked servers systems, mostly
because he likes to sleep at night. Standing on the shoulders of giants,
his background includes partnering to run a Virtual Server ISP before
anyone called it a cloud, as well as having a long history building
internet-facing infrastructure with UNIX systems.

.ike has been a part of NYC*BUG since it was first launched in January
2004. He was a long-time member of the Lower East Side Mac Unix User
Group, and is still in denial that this group no longer exists. He has
spoken frequently on a number of UNIX and internet security topics at
various venues, particularly on the topic of FreeBSD's jail(8).

Robert Menes | 1 Feb 18:51 2016
Picon
Gravatar

[talk] *BSD experiments

Hey folks!

I'm glad I came to the installfest in January! It was nice meeting everyone, and I want
to extend a big thanks to George for giving me a FreeBSD SD card for my Pi! I've been
playing with it on and off and learning a bit more about how the BSDs work under the hood!

No, I'm not leaving Linux behind, but learning BSD is beneficial! ;)

Anyways, I've thrown together an extra box with some spare parts over the weekend. The specs
aren't the greatest; it's a Core 2 Duo with 4GB RAM and only an Nvidia GeForce 6200 PCI card
for video (the motherboard is an Intel DG41MJ motherboard in Mini-ITX size), but I'm thinking
about installing a BSD onto it and learning more about the OS with it. That said, I'm deciding
between FreeBSD, PC-BSD, or even going with DragonflyBSD to study its Amiga-esque roots.

OpenBSD and NetBSD are off the list for now as I'm keeping those for older machines, and
OpenBSD may be going onto my old ThinkPad T42.

So what would be the best bet for my spare box?

Cheers!

--Robert

--
Nobody's ever lost in life...they're merely taking the scenic route.
==============================
Please avoid sending me Word or PowerPoint attachments.
See http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html
==============================
-----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
Version: 3.1.2
GCS/S/M/MU d- s+: a34 C++(+++) UL++++>$ P++ L+++ E+ W+ N+ o+ K++ w--- O-
M !V PS+ PE Y+ PGP(+) t+ 5++ X++ R tv b+++ DI+++ D++(---) G++ e+ h-
r++ y+
------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------
<div><div dir="ltr">Hey folks!<div><br></div>
<div>I'm glad I came to the installfest in January! It was nice meeting everyone, and I want</div>
<div>to extend a big thanks to George for giving me a FreeBSD SD card for my Pi! I've been</div>
<div>playing with it on and off and learning a bit more about how the BSDs work under the hood!</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>No, I'm not leaving Linux behind, but learning BSD is beneficial! ;)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Anyways, I've thrown together an extra box with some spare parts over the weekend. The specs</div>
<div>aren't the greatest; it's a Core 2 Duo with 4GB RAM and only an Nvidia GeForce 6200 PCI card</div>
<div>for video (the motherboard is an Intel DG41MJ motherboard in Mini-ITX size), but I'm thinking</div>
<div>about installing a BSD onto it and learning more about the OS with it. That said, I'm deciding</div>
<div>between FreeBSD, PC-BSD, or even going with DragonflyBSD to study its Amiga-esque roots.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>OpenBSD and NetBSD are off the list for now as I'm keeping those for older machines, and</div>
<div>OpenBSD may be going onto my old ThinkPad T42.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>So what would be the best bet for my spare box?</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Cheers!</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>--Robert</div>
<div>
<div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr">Nobody's ever lost in life...they're merely taking the scenic route.<br>==============================<br>Please avoid sending me Word or PowerPoint attachments.<br>See <a href="http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html" target="_blank">http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html</a><br>==============================<br>-----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----<br>Version: 3.1.2<br>GCS/S/M/MU d- s+: a34 C++(+++) UL++++&gt;$ P++ L+++ E+ W+ N+ o+ K++ w--- O-<br>M !V PS+ PE Y+ PGP(+) t+ 5++ X++ R tv b+++ DI+++ D++(---) G++ e+ h-<br>r++ y+<br>------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------</div></div>
</div>
</div></div>

Gmane