Edrich de Lange | 1 Nov 13:45 2011
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Telkom Etherlink

Good day

Has anyone here played with Telkoms Etherlink Service?
I'm looking for some info re reliability, Latency and Jitter.

Telkom claims its a diginet replacement, but I am a bit skeptical on
the reliability side of things.

Kind regards

--

-- 
Edrich de Lange
edd@...
0832629566
Chairman: Performing Arts Centre of Ethekwini
Treasurer: Durban City Orchestra
Comittee member : Durban Linux user group

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Gregory Massel | 5 Nov 01:07 2011
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Re: Telkom Etherlink

I haven't used it, but in every meeting I've had with Telkom that we've 
mentioned EtherLink, they were exceptionally quick to state that it was 
*NOT* comparable to diginet and an entirely different service.

(They weren't suggesting it was any less (or more) reliable, simply that 
it was not comparable.)

On 2011/11/01 02:45 PM, Edrich de Lange wrote:
> Good day
>
> Has anyone here played with Telkoms Etherlink Service?
> I'm looking for some info re reliability, Latency and Jitter.
>
> Telkom claims its a diginet replacement, but I am a bit skeptical on
> the reliability side of things.
>
> Kind regards
>

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Guy Antony Halse | 18 Nov 11:07 2011

2011/11/24 - 20th Anniversary of Internet in South Africa


The 12th of November 2011 marked the twentieth anniversary of Internet
Access in South Africa.  In recognition of the achievements of the early
pioneers who's work made this possible, the Information Technology Division
at Rhodes University would like to invite you to join us in a small
celebration to mark this event.

  Where: Arts Major, Rhodes University, Grahamstown

  When: Thursday 24 November 2011  <at>  18:00

  What: A historical perspective from some of the original protagonists. 
        Speakers include Mike Lawrie, Randy Bush, Alan Barrett & Angus Hay.

  Who: anybody who's interested, but especially people who were involved

  Costs: none, other than getting here

We'll be streaming the event, so those who can't make it in person are
welcome to join us via the Internet.

Full details, including directions and information on live streaming, are
available at http://www.ru.ac.za/ipinza/.

- Guy
--

-- 
Systems Manager, IT Division, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
Email: G.Halse@...   Web: http://mombe.org/  IRC: rm-rf@...
*** ANSI Standard Disclaimer ***                                   J.A.P.H

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Henry Watermeyer | 19 Nov 20:58 2011
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Re: 2011/11/24 - 20th Anniversary of Internet in South Africa


Hi All

As one of those around at the time I would dearly love to be there on 
the 24th.  Unfortunately it is just not practical and I will have to try 
and take it via the Internet.

At the time I don't think any of us appreciated just what we we were 
seeing.  Yes we had been playing around with networked systems around 
the country and, thanks to Randy Bush, around the world but up till 
TCP/IP what we did was exciting but limited.

The impact at University level, at least at Wits where I was, was 
extraordinary.   The internal political battles enormous.  Nobody in 
power wanted to give us money to spend on the infrastructure while the 
academic community were screaming for the university to go "open".  To 
get off the IBM network standards.  TCP/IP vs emerging standards now 
long forgotten.   What was going to be the right approach?   How to 
prepare Strategic Plans for a totally uncertain future became my 
challenge, coupled with how to build the right network with limited 
funds and little clarity on the future.

Post graduate students like Angus Hay applied huge pressure and Mark 
Elkins, then at Olivetti, conspired to install News software on the 
Convex super computer, then the most powerful research computer in the 
country.

Our undergraduates learned well and a group of them went off to start 
Internet Solutions.   Far sighted indeed.

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Graham Leggett | 19 Nov 23:54 2011

Re: 2011/11/24 - 20th Anniversary of Internet in South Africa

On 19 Nov 2011, at 9:58 PM, Henry Watermeyer wrote:

>   Our undergraduates learned well and a group of them went off to  
> start
>   Internet Solutions.   Far sighted indeed.

In the early nineties Wits undergraduates were not allowed access to  
the internet at all, and nothing motivates like the forbidden.

We worked around the restrictions, gained access, and I ended up  
moving from Wits through VWV Interactive before finding myself as part- 
author-of and maintainer of the Apache httpd webserver. I still  
remember the precise place I was standing in the Chamber of Mines  
building when I first learned the internet existed and was off limits,  
if it wasn't for that moment, my involvement in the net would probably  
have been very different. :)

Regards,
Graham
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Zane Wilson | 20 Nov 01:27 2011

Re: 2011/11/24 - 20th Anniversary of Internet in South Africa

On 19/11/2011 22:54, Graham Leggett wrote:
> On 19 Nov 2011, at 9:58 PM, Henry Watermeyer wrote:
>
>>   Our undergraduates learned well and a group of them went off to start
>>   Internet Solutions.   Far sighted indeed.
>
> In the early nineties Wits undergraduates were not allowed access to 
> the internet at all, and nothing motivates like the forbidden.
I still remember the time in 1992 I was called into Henry's office to be 
chastised for accessing a Usenet newsgroup and sending email to a fellow 
undergrad at UCT via the "witsvma.wits.ac.za" IBM mainframe that we had 
access to. And while the computer science department was a lot more 
forgiving there was also a time in 1993 that a bunch of us had a remark 
"put in our permanent file" for using the Trumpet news reader in the 
CSIII computer lab (which as I recall was cabled with thin coax). And in 
1994, when internet access was finally allowed (perk of being a post 
grad) the only way to get online from home (until Andras kindly gave me 
a free account on apollo.is.co.za including SLIP dialup access) was via 
the mainframe terminal emulator dialup then telnet into concave.wits.ac.za

Those were the days!

Zane.

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Mike Lawrie | 20 Nov 07:54 2011

Re: 2011/11/24 - 20th Anniversary of Internet in South Africa

Zane Wilson wrote
> On 19/11/2011 22:54, Graham Leggett wrote:
>> On 19 Nov 2011, at 9:58 PM, Henry Watermeyer wrote:
>>
>>>   Our undergraduates learned well and a group of them went off to start
>>>   Internet Solutions.   Far sighted indeed.
>>
>> In the early nineties Wits undergraduates were not allowed access to the 
>> internet at all, and nothing motivates like the forbidden.
> I still remember the time in 1992 I was called into Henry's office to be 
> chastised for accessing a Usenet newsgroup and sending email to a fellow

There were different approaches to Internet usage at the different 
universities. At
Rhodes, I took the approach that no student was going to be able to say "I 
was not
allowed to use the network." The computer labs were opened 24/7, many 
students
were in nearby residences, and the network performed better in the small 
hours of
the morning. The labs were fairly busy. Also, the PCs would be obsolete 
before
they were worn out, and the network costs did not increase with usage.

Make no mistake, this approach led to headaches, but for sure it generated
a set of computer-competent graduates (and dropouts). I recall being asked 
by some
academic staff to limit student access. Those staff were concerned (with 
some
justification) that the network was too much of a distraction for the 
(Continue reading)

Keith Waters | 21 Nov 07:29 2011
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Re: 2011/11/24 - 20th Anniversary of Internet in South Africa

At UCT, we (undergrads) had unrestricted Internet as early as 1992.   
(Boy, was it slow!)      Initially accessing from a VAX, I was given a 
free linux shell account at a American ISP, to which I could telnet 
(before the days of ssh!) and use more services.

The following year ('93), we (Computer Science students) were given 
access to a unix server and encouraged to install linux (version one!!) 
at home.

The next year ('94), Anthony Walker and I launched an ISP using just a 
386 and probably 1MB of RAM :->

Regards,
Keith

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Guy Antony Halse | 21 Nov 08:17 2011
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Re: 2011/11/24 - 20th Anniversary of Internet in South Africa


On Sun 2011-11-20 (08:54), Mike Lawrie wrote:
> Make no mistake, this approach led to headaches, but for sure it generated
> a set of computer-competent graduates (and dropouts). I recall being asked 

I suspect that I am a product of the environment Mike created.  As such, I
have some recollections of being a student at Rhodes, albeit a couple of
years after Mike left.

IRC was one of the few things that was categorically banned in labs.  We
used it anyway, and frequently got in trouble for doing so.  Nevertheless, I
met a lot of interesting people that way, all of whom were also feeling
their way around the Internet and around new open-source projects.  It was a
great way to share ideas and learn, much as I guess e-mail was a few years
earlier.

RUCUS, the student computer users' society, was well tolerated which gave
students a reasonably controlled environment to play around.  I suspect that
from the computing centre's point of view, it was self policing and kept us
from playing with more important computers.  

There were unwritten rules about what was okay to experiment and play with,
and what was not.  The rules were passed around by word of mouth, mostly
from people who'd been caught trying to do things that were not and who'd
received a stern talking to for their efforts.  This pool of collective
knowledge was part of the geek culture that existed, and probably played a
significant role in keeping things from getting out of hand.

Which brings me to when I first met Jacot as an undergrad.  I was invited by
means of a post-it note on a PC I'd annexed in the CS honours lab.  It
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Henry Watermeyer | 21 Nov 09:44 2011
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Re: 2011/11/24 - 20th Anniversary of Internet in South Africa

Yes indeed it was a fantastic time.

It is most interesting to read things from the students perspective.

As I said earlier our problems were that not being an "open" based 
campus we were still heavily dependent on the IBM mainframes and very 
limited network capacity via Potch to Rhodes and then out.    I think if 
was 9.6 Kb line at that stage but I really cannot remember.

The academic imperative of access to the Internet was still a long way 
in the future and, in general terms, apart from Computer Sc and 
Electrical Engineering there was no understanding at all of what was to 
come.

It was interesting because I was hired into a pure IBM shop where 
University management was resisting pressure from amongst others Prof 
Hugh Hanrehan in Electrical Engineering and some, by no means all, of 
the Computer Scientists to change our policies.  In fact at my interview 
Hugh asked me my views on platform standards and the DVC to whom I 
reported, Jerry Steele who had been the second Director of the Computer 
Centre following Mikes boss at Rhodes Prof Henderson, said he expected 
to find my staff in protest marches as I made changes.   That didn't 
happen but I did loose some very competent senior staff along the way.

IBM and Microsoft didn't believe it but change was on the way.

We installed our first general purpose SUN machine some time in the 
middle 90s which helped but the conversion to on campus TCP/IP took a 
long time.   The network remained unstable for a long time and I 
remember being horrified while driving to work to hear one of our 
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Gmane