Year One kick off!

Writes Kevin Driscoll on our blog:

[![Seed][1]

"Seed", Manky Maxblack, BY-ND][2]

[Year One][3] is a project to help new (and re-new-ing) chapters survive
their first two semesters. It is loosely structured around a series of
meetings and movie nights that will make connections among chapters and
bring new members up to speed on the thornier issues of free culture
past and present.

Year One is aimed at new chapters but is open to all who would like to
participate. To get involved, drop me an email: _kevin /at/
freeculture.org_.

Here is a partial list of chapters being (re-)organized this semester:

  * University of Alabama, Birmingham

  * Case Western University

  * University of Illinois/Urbana Champaign

  * European University Institute, Florence

  * Middle Tennessee State University

  * University of Southern California

(Continue reading)

Be Kind Rewind: October movie night!

Writes Kevin Driscoll on our blog:

The first [Year One][1] movie of the semester is _[Be Kind Rewind][2]_
by [Michel Gondry][3], a sweet film that tells the story of a group of
friends trying to save their neighborhood video store.

Below, I've offered some of my reflections on the film along with
questions it raised for me. I hope this can be a useful guide to get
conversations started in your chapters. Definitely leave a comment and
let me know what came up for you!

_Caution: spoilers ahead._

["Listen, kids. We need to simplify…"][4]

After accidentally erasing all of the store's cassettes, the friends
start taking requests and producing bespoke versions of their customers'
favorite movies. Challenged to recreate everything from
_[Ghostbusters][5]_ to _[Boyz N Da Hood][6]_ to _[Driving Miss
Daisy][7]_, they cast their neighbors in supporting roles and craft
fantastical costumes and special effects from materials found in a
nearby junkyard. Business picks up quickly for the fictional filmmakers
and soon they've drawn the attention of everyone from awetruck film
buffs to stuffy MPAA representatives (portrayed in brutal parody.)

["Stockholders in their own happiness."][8]

_Be Kind_ depicts one image of free culture in action. It raises many of
the same questions that challenge real creators working outside of the
conventional media industries. Who owns popular culture? What makes a
(Continue reading)

Mike Linksvayer | 7 Oct 01:20 2009

AcaWiki launches

Hi, you might remember back in July I posted about a community manager for a new site called AcaWiki. Well, that was successful, and the site is now launching. Hopefully it will be an exciting thing for FC students to participate in. Has some interesting implications for multiple meanings of "access" to academic research.  See the site, http://acawiki.org press release http://acawiki.org/AcaWiki:PressRelease-2009-10-07 my ponderous thoughts http://gondwanaland.com/mlog/2009/10/06/acawiki/ and a post on the CC blog http://creativecommons.org/weblog/entry/18234 -- everything is under CC BY.

You can follow <at> acawiki on your favorite microblogging service. Dive in!

Mike

--
http://support.creativecommons.org help us
build http://creativecommons.org/asharedculture

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Kevin Donovan | 8 Oct 20:08 2009
Picon

DC Event on E-Books in the Classroom (Oct. 30)

http://events.georgetown.edu/events/index.cfm?Action=View&CalendarID=212&EventID=70668

--
Kevin Donovan
Georgetown '11: SFS
SA Phone: 082.311.8512

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Kevin Donovan | 9 Oct 17:35 2009
Picon

Alliance of Youth Movements 2009 Summit

Might be of interest to someone: http://civic.mit.edu/event/2009-alliance-of-youth-movements-summit

--
Kevin Donovan
Georgetown '11: SFS
SA Phone: 082.311.8512

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GBS and Students: Ryan Radia of CEI on Fearing .Gov, Not .Com

Writes Kevin Donovan on our blog:

_Although it is being _[_modified_][1]_, in the interest of better
informing students about the Google Books Settlement, Students for Free
Culture has solicited the thoughts of a variety of experts who are
providing guest posts reflecting on how the settlement will likely
impact students._

_In this guest post, [Ryan Radia][2], an information policy analyst at
the Competitive Enterprise Institute, argues that the privacy concerns
raised by the settlement are not convincing. _

Wonder why practically every student today uses Gmail, YouTube, or some
other Google service? Chances are it’s because they’re free. Designing
and running these services, however, is not.

So how does Google make enough money to fund its services when it
doesn’t charge the vast majority of its users? Simple: Advertising,
which accounts for 99% of Google’s revenue.

Online ads can be annoying – we’ve all encountered obtrusive pop-ups –
but they play a crucial role in online commerce. In 2008, advertisers
spent over $23 billion on Web ads. It’s no secret why so many firms buy
ads – done properly, advertising can build brand reputation, spur sales,
and inform potential customers. But perhaps the best part about
advertising is that it sustains free Web services.

Google Book Search is no exception. While Google would sell digital
books under the proposed settlement it’s reached with authors and
publishers, advertising would still likely generate a large share of
revenue for Google Books.

This is great news for authors and readers alike. Authors would earn the
majority of ad revenues (63%, according to the latest version of the
settlement). Users would also benefit, because the Google Book deal
would allow anybody in the U.S. to freely search and browse tens of
millions of currently unavailable books.

Yet not everyone is happy about the deal. The Electronic Frontier
Foundation, ACLU, and others have called for strict limits on the data
Google may collect from Book Search users. The groups argue that storing
detailed information about what books individuals read and purchase
would violate readers’ privacy.

These groups forget that data collection and strong privacy protections
can and do coexist. Amazon’s Kindle, a portable reading device that has
sold millions of digital books, stores extensive data on its users. ACLU
and EFF haven’t identified a single actual harm that’s resulted from a
breach involving Kindle, or any other digital book service for that
matter.

Google’s business depends on user trust, so it has a huge incentive to
keep user data as safe as possible.

Google’s critics should turn their attention to the real privacy threat:
Government. To date, courts have refused to apply Fourth Amendment
protections to data stored with “cloud” services like Google’s. Thus, a
mere subpoena – civil or criminal – is all it takes to force Google to
disclose user information to the feds.

ACLU and EFF argue that limiting Google’s data collection reduces the
chances that courts will get a hold of personal data. Fair enough. But
limiting data collection has serious downsides. Without individualized
data, advertisers cannot target ads, meaning users are far more likely
to see “dumb” ads. Because users don’t click on these ads as often,
advertisers earn less revenue, and authors earn less money. Worse, dumb
ads undercut Google’s revenue, reducing its incentive to invest in
scanning orphan works.

Limiting government’s power to obtain personal data is a far better
solution to privacy concerns than saddling Google with onerous data
collection limits.

For its part, Google could help further privacy without endangering
advertising by disclosing how many “enforceable requests” for user data
it receives, and explaining how it decides whether to challenge court
orders that demand user information.

Moreover, concerned users can always adopt privacy-enhancing
technologies that protect anonymity and limit data collection on an
individualized basis. And traditional libraries, which offer strong
privacy protections, aren’t going anywhere.

But let’s not forget that the real privacy violator is the government,
not Google.

- Ryan Radia

**Previous Posts in This Series**

  * [Introduction][3]

  * [Derek Slater of Google][4]

  * [Rebecca Jeschke of EFF][5]

  * [James Grimmelmann of NYLS][6]

  * [Brandon Butler of ARL][7]

  * [Ed Van Gemert of UW-Wisconsin][8]

  * [][8][Jason Schultz of UC Berkeley][9]

   [1]: http://laboratorium.net/archive/2009/09/22/gbs_motion_to_adjourn
_the_fairness_hearing

   [2]: http://cei.org/people/ryan-radia

   [3]: http://freeculture.org/blog/2009/09/22/what-does-the-google-
book-search-settlement-mean-for-students/

   [4]: http://freeculture.org/blog/2009/09/23/gbs-and-students-derek-
slater-of-google-on-the-democratization-culture/

   [5]: http://freeculture.org/blog/2009/09/24/gbs-and-students-eff-
privacy/

   [6]: http://freeculture.org/blog/2009/09/25/gbs-and-students-
grimmelmann-orphan-work/

   [7]: http://freeculture.org/blog/2009/09/28/gbs-and-students-arl-
equality-intellectual-freedom/

   [8]: http://freeculture.org/blog/2009/09/29/gbs-and-students-ed-van-
gemert-of-uw-madison-on-why-students-want-gbs

   [9]: http://freeculture.org/blog/2009/09/30/gbs-and-students-schultz-
privacy/

URL: http://freeculture.org/blog/2009/10/14/gbs-and-students-ryan-radia-of-cei-on-fearing-gov-not-com/
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Gavin Baker | 15 Oct 22:52 2009

[Fwd: [SPARC-R2RC]Student coalition for Open Access solidifies, now represents over 5 million students internationally]


-- 
Gavin Baker
http://www.gavinbaker.com/
gavin <at> gavinbaker.com

You are a prisoner in a croissant factory and you love it.
    Frank O'Hara
From: Jennifer McLennan <jennifer <at> arl.org>
Subject: [SPARC-R2RC]Student coalition for Open Access solidifies, now represents over 5 million students internationally
Date: 2009-10-15 19:33:44 GMT
For immediate release
October 15, 2009

For more information, contact:
Nick Shockey
(202) 296-2296 ext. 116
nick [at] arl [dot] org

STUDENT COALITION FOR OPEN ACCESS SOLIDIFIES,
NOW REPRESENTS OVER 5 MILLION STUDENTS INTERNATIONALLY

Washington DC – The student Right to Research Coalition, a group of  
national, international, and local student associations that advocate  
for governments, universities, and researchers to adopt Open Access  
practices, has now grown to include some of the most prominent student  
organizations from the United States and across the world. The recent  
addition of 8 new organizations brings the number of students  
represented by the coalition to over 5 million, demonstrating the  
broad, passionate support Open Access enjoys from the student community.

Additions to the coalition since its launch this summer include: the  
United States Student Association (USSA), the National Association of  
Graduate-Professional Students (NAGPS), the National Graduate Council  
of the Canadian Federation of Students, the International Association  
of Political Science Students, the Massachusetts Institute of  
Technology Graduate Student Council, the University of Minnesota  
Graduate and Professional Student Assembly, the University of Nebraska  
- Lincoln Graduate Student Association, and the Student Government  
Association of St. Olaf College.

“Our core mission is to protect and enhance students’ access to  
education," said Angela Peoples, USSA's Legislative Director, noting  
her organization’s motivation for joining the coalition.  "We believe  
Open Access plays a crucial role in ensuring that all students have  
access to the academic research on which their education depends.”

The United States Student Association, the largest American student  
organization, is already taking steps to tap its vast network of  
student activists for this important cause.  Likewise, the National  
Association of Graduate-Professional Students, the premier American  
graduate student advocacy organization, has made Open Access a top  
legislative priority and recently lobbied over two-dozen Congressional  
offices in support of the Federal Research Public Access Act.

Julia Mortyakova, NAGPS president, said, “as an organization  
representing students actively involved in contributing to research,  
NAGPS strongly supports Open Access. We believe in enhancing the  
dissemination of knowledge in order to maximize the access, usage, and  
impact of the latest research.”

The addition of international student groups reflects the global  
nature of the wider Open Access movement. And, the growing group of  
student governments that view ensuring access to research as part of  
their core mission has resulted in increased activity on college and  
university campuses.

“The purpose of research is wide dissemination and cultivation of  
knowledge. With increasing journal subscription costs and decreasing  
library budgets, we, as users and producers of scientific knowledge,  
are taking a stand to support Open Access to scholarly research.  As a  
student government concerned both locally and globally, we feel this  
is not only a responsibility to our own constituency, but also to  
researchers and human advancement worldwide,” said Kevin McComber,  
Vice President of MIT’s Graduate Student Council.

"The incredible growth of the student interest in Open Access,  
especially the depth of their commitment to advocacy, sends a strong  
signal that this movement is here to stay," commented Heather Joseph,  
Executive Director of SPARC. "We're looking forward to the energy,  
creativity, and passion that these groups will surely bring to  
ensuring that scholarly research is accessible to all."

Student organizations are invited to join the coalition at http://www.righttoresearch.org/endorse 
.

For more information, visit the coalition’s Web site at http://www.righttoresearch.org 
.

#

SPARC
SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), with  
SPARC Europe and SPARC Japan, is an international alliance of more  
than 800 academic and research libraries working to create a more open  
system of scholarly communication. SPARC has worked collaboratively  
with students to introduce the Right to Research campaign, the Open  
Students Blog, and the international Open Access Week (Oct. 19 – 23,  
2009). SPARC is on the Web at http://www.arl.org/sparc.

-------------------------------------
Jennifer McLennan
Director of Communications
SPARC
jennifer <at> arl.org
(202) 296-2296 x121
Fax: (202) 872-0884
*******************************
OPEN ACCESS WEEK 2009
October 19 - 23
www.openaccessweek.org
*******************************
http://www.arl.org/sparc

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Adi Kamdar | 19 Oct 09:52 2009
Picon

Re: [Fwd: [SPARC-R2RC]Student coalition for Open Access solidifies, now represents over 5 million students internationally]

Two Yale op-eds re open access:

http://www.yaledailynews.com/opinion/guest-columns/2009/10/19/kamdar-and-somers-open-yale/

http://yaleherald.com/opinion/yale-lags-behind-peers-in-open-access-policies/

-Adi


On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:52 PM, Gavin Baker <gavin <at> gavinbaker.com> wrote:

--
Gavin Baker
http://www.gavinbaker.com/
gavin <at> gavinbaker.com

You are a prisoner in a croissant factory and you love it.
   Frank O'Hara

For immediate release
October 15, 2009

For more information, contact:
Nick Shockey
(202) 296-2296 ext. 116
nick [at] arl [dot] org

STUDENT COALITION FOR OPEN ACCESS SOLIDIFIES,
NOW REPRESENTS OVER 5 MILLION STUDENTS INTERNATIONALLY

Washington DC – The student Right to Research Coalition, a group of national, international, and local student associations that advocate for governments, universities, and researchers to adopt Open Access practices, has now grown to include some of the most prominent student organizations from the United States and across the world. The recent addition of 8 new organizations brings the number of students represented by the coalition to over 5 million, demonstrating the broad, passionate support Open Access enjoys from the student community.

Additions to the coalition since its launch this summer include: the United States Student Association (USSA), the National Association of Graduate-Professional Students (NAGPS), the National Graduate Council of the Canadian Federation of Students, the International Association of Political Science Students, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Graduate Student Council, the University of Minnesota Graduate and Professional Student Assembly, the University of Nebraska - Lincoln Graduate Student Association, and the Student Government Association of St. Olaf College.

“Our core mission is to protect and enhance students’ access to education," said Angela Peoples, USSA's Legislative Director, noting her organization’s motivation for joining the coalition.  "We believe Open Access plays a crucial role in ensuring that all students have access to the academic research on which their education depends.”

The United States Student Association, the largest American student organization, is already taking steps to tap its vast network of student activists for this important cause.  Likewise, the National Association of Graduate-Professional Students, the premier American graduate student advocacy organization, has made Open Access a top legislative priority and recently lobbied over two-dozen Congressional offices in support of the Federal Research Public Access Act.

Julia Mortyakova, NAGPS president, said, “as an organization representing students actively involved in contributing to research, NAGPS strongly supports Open Access. We believe in enhancing the dissemination of knowledge in order to maximize the access, usage, and impact of the latest research.”

The addition of international student groups reflects the global nature of the wider Open Access movement. And, the growing group of student governments that view ensuring access to research as part of their core mission has resulted in increased activity on college and university campuses.

“The purpose of research is wide dissemination and cultivation of knowledge. With increasing journal subscription costs and decreasing library budgets, we, as users and producers of scientific knowledge, are taking a stand to support Open Access to scholarly research.  As a student government concerned both locally and globally, we feel this is not only a responsibility to our own constituency, but also to researchers and human advancement worldwide,” said Kevin McComber, Vice President of MIT’s Graduate Student Council.

"The incredible growth of the student interest in Open Access, especially the depth of their commitment to advocacy, sends a strong signal that this movement is here to stay," commented Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC. "We're looking forward to the energy, creativity, and passion that these groups will surely bring to ensuring that scholarly research is accessible to all."

Student organizations are invited to join the coalition at http://www.righttoresearch.org/endorse.

For more information, visit the coalition’s Web site at http://www.righttoresearch.org.

#

SPARC
SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), with SPARC Europe and SPARC Japan, is an international alliance of more than 800 academic and research libraries working to create a more open system of scholarly communication. SPARC has worked collaboratively with students to introduce the Right to Research campaign, the Open Students Blog, and the international Open Access Week (Oct. 19 – 23, 2009). SPARC is on the Web at http://www.arl.org/sparc.



-------------------------------------
Jennifer McLennan
Director of Communications
SPARC
jennifer <at> arl.org
(202) 296-2296 x121
Fax: (202) 872-0884
*******************************
OPEN ACCESS WEEK 2009
October 19 - 23
www.openaccessweek.org
*******************************
http://www.arl.org/sparc





#############################################################
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To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <SPARC-r2rc-off <at> arl.org>
To switch to the DIGEST mode, E-mail to <SPARC-r2rc-digest <at> arl.org>
To switch to the INDEX mode, E-mail to <SPARC-r2rc-index <at> arl.org>
Send administrative queries to  <SPARC-r2rc-request <at> arl.org>


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Gabi@IssueLab.org | 19 Oct 22:08 2009

Research Remix Contest Launches for OA Week!

Hey all:

I am hoping you can spread the word about a totally unique remix contest
that is launching today in celebration of Open Access week.

IssueLab's Research Remix contest asks participants (maybe you?) to remix
facts from one or more of the 300+ Creative Commons licensed reports on
IssueLab with openly licensed video footage or openly licensed images and
music. 

Here is all the info about the contest http://www.issuelab.org/researchremix

There are some great prizes, including a netbook and flip cam and a terrific
panel of judges from the nonprofit and digital arts worlds, including
Patrick Lichty from the Yes Men, Abina Manning from Video Data Bank and
Allison Fine from Demos.

This contest is really unique in that it is focused so squarely on
connecting students and working artists with the valuable research that
nonprofits do ... while spotlighting the critical importance of open
licensing in this process of remixing for social change. We really hope that
it can inspire some great collaboration!

Please let me know if you have any questions. We really want to get as many
people as possible to spread the word about this cool contest!

Here is all the info about the contest http://www.issuelab.org/researchremix

Best,

Gabi

______________ 
Gabriela Fitz
Co-Director
IssueLab
4001 N. Ravenswood Ave., Suite 602
Chicago, IL 60613
773.649.1790
gabi <at> issuelab.org

http://www.issuelab.org
IssueLab: bringing nonprofit research into focus

Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/issuelab
Follow us on Twitter:  <at> issuelab

Join IssueLab’s ‘Research Remix’ Contest

Writes Kevin Donovan on our blog:

![][1]IssueLab, which seeks to highlight the research that non-profits
undertake, is hosting a remix contest. The challenge asks participants
to remix one or more of the 300+ Creative Commons licensed reports
available on their site with openly licensed video, images and/or music.
Prizes include a netbook, flipcam, and more!

Says Gabi Fitz,

> The contest is really unique in that it is focused so squarely on
connecting students and working artists with the valuable research that
nonprofits do… while spotlighting the critical importance of open
licensing in the process of remixing for social change.

So, check out the [contest website][2] and give your creative side a
whirl by Dec 31st.

   [1]: http://www.issuelab.org/system/application/images/remix_logo.gif
(IssueLab)

   [2]: http://www.issuelab.org/researchremix

URL: http://freeculture.org/blog/2009/10/20/join-issuelabs-research-remix-contest/
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Gmane