Dan Strahs | 7 Apr 01:15 2006

10-Gigabit ethernet questions


Hi:

I've been thinking about the 10-gigabit products Myricom is developing and 
I have questions that I was hoping might be answerable.

1) Myricom is selling the cards, but what switches are these cards for?

2) The software to support these cards currently is released as a beta 
test. Is the software stable for long-term performance?

3) The performance tests were executed using two nodes, each with two 
dual-core Opterons. Have any performance tests been performed in any 
topology other than two nodes hooked directly to each other?

Thanks!

Dan Strahs
Susan Blackford | 7 Apr 15:02 2006

Re: 10-Gigabit ethernet questions

Dan,

Dan Strahs wrote:
> Hi:
> 
> I've been thinking about the 10-gigabit products Myricom is developing and 
> I have questions that I was hoping might be answerable.
> 
> 1) Myricom is selling the cards, but what switches are these cards for?

Myri-10G NICs are dual-protocol NICs.

They can be used in 10-Gigabit Ethernet mode with your choice of any
commercially available 10-Gigabit Ethernet switch.

Or, they can be used in 10-Gigabit Myrinet mode with a Myri-10G switch.

Myri-10G switches have been displayed at trade shows including SC05
(see http://www.myri.com/news/051121/) and LinuxWorld Boston, but are
not yet listed on the web.

> 
> 2) The software to support these cards currently is released as a beta 
> test. Is the software stable for long-term performance?

Myri10GE (Myri-10G in 10-Gigabit Ethernet mode) software is currently
available in beta release and the official 1.0 regular release is
expected within a few weeks.

MX-10G (Myri-10G in 10-Gigabit Myrinet mode) software is currently
(Continue reading)

Patrick Geoffray | 7 Apr 16:17 2006

Re: 10-Gigabit ethernet questions

Hi Dan,

Just to complete Susan's reply.

Susan Blackford wrote:
>> 1) Myricom is selling the cards, but what switches are these cards for?
> 
> 
> Myri-10G NICs are dual-protocol NICs.

The 10G nics use the same physical link as 10 Gigabit Ethernet (true 
10Gb/s data rate). There are two differences between Ethernet and 
Myrinet at the protocol level:

* Flow control: Myrinet has byte-level backpressure flow control whereas 
Ethernet as Packet-level flow control. In short, Myrinet has little 
buffering in the switch and the sender can be stopped in the middle of 
sending a packet if the packet is blocked somewhere. Ethernet needs to 
be able to buffer a full packet (ie 9000 Bytes jumbo frame) and it uses 
special PAUSE packets to stop the sender.

* Routing: Myrinet routing is source-based and Ethernet routing is 
destination-based. The Ethernet destination MAC address is looked up by 
each crossbar to find the exit port. The Myrinet packet contain the exit 
port to take for each crossbar.

There are 3 types of usage for Myri-10G NICs:

* IT/Storage: Using it as an Ethernet NIC (typically running IP on it), 
plugged in a 10GigE switch from any vendor and an Ethernet NIC. Today, 
(Continue reading)

Susan Blackford | 10 Apr 05:25 2006

Re: 10-Gigabit ethernet questions

Hi, Mark,

Mark Hahn wrote:
>>>2) The software to support these cards currently is released as a beta 
>>>test. Is the software stable for long-term performance?
>>
>>Myri10GE (Myri-10G in 10-Gigabit Ethernet mode) software is currently
>>available in beta release and the official 1.0 regular release is
>>expected within a few weeks.
>>
>>MX-10G (Myri-10G in 10-Gigabit Myrinet mode) software is currently
>>available in beta release.
>>
>>There are several Myri-10G customer installations using 10G Myrinet
>>with Myri-10G switches and a beta version of MX-10G.  These
>>installations -- up to 128 nodes -- are seeing good stability and
>>exceptional application performance.
> 
> 
> I'd be interested in some commentary/explanation/guidance from Myri
> regarding 10GE media.  how soon do you expect the new 10GE-over-cat[567]
> to be available, for instance?

According to the following article:

http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=2222&dekey=10GBASE-T&curtab=2222_1&linktext=10GBASE-T

the final version is expected in Summer 2006.

 From various other resources, Cat-5e, if deployed at all, will certainly
(Continue reading)


Gmane