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NI Update GR 5.2.1 Win Update



NI Update GR 5.2.1 Win Update



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Posted by: david.bradley133 <at> gmail.com


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NI Update GR 5.2.1 Win Update



NI Update GR 5.2.1 Win Update came with ,Kontact 5 player 5.2.2 Win Up date, some one loves us any details ?

Fixes : browser path reset,Fixed preset GUI/Abeton live,live view refresh etc



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Posted by: david.bradley133 <at> gmail.com


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Re: Axon AX100 MkII and incoming program changes



In my opinion, using your midi merge is the simplest solution if you want to keep your present midi pedalboard.
The Behringer FCB1010 is in my opinion a nightmare to set up (I tried to use it with my Ztars, but gave up long ago.)
Changing channel volumes relative to each other with it was OK, but the learning/remembering curve was just silly and the whole thing very badly thought out..

You have to program it by standing on the switches a certain number of times and you either have to remember how to do it, or read the manual whilst laying on the floor, pressing them

Working out the meanings of hieroglyphics in display about the size of a postage stamp was also a big and unfunny joke..  I have the latest FCB1010  firmware update but gave up on the bloody thing after a few wasted afternoons.  There is software for it, but IMO like the FCB1010,  it's just a waste of time.

I also have an Axon AX100  gathering dust, but haven't used the FCB1010 with it at all
Sensible offers for both? :-)

regards
 
richard
bg (Bulgaria)


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Posted by: richard brown <napravobg <at> yahoo.co.uk>


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YRG Gen 2 plus Radius Neck for sale




i'm selling my YRG and radius neck .most of you probably know what this is . for those who don't , it's  . o latency midi guitar if played in left hand mode . with supper comfortable

and easy to play  Radius neck -sold by retailers  separately . its heads above Yamaha G 10  . for a fraction of it's price . i need to raise cash for something else hence i have few of my gear on sale on gumtree.






You Rock Guitar YRG-1000 Gen2 + radius neck | United Kingdom | Gumtree




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Posted by: artour.kats <at> gmail.com


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Re: Soldering. Was: PG-380



I tin my wd 1m just like you would any other iron.
I'm using a WMRP micro pencil with the RT3 chisel tip & I swear it's like soldering with a ball point pen.
It gives me surgeon like precisio n, I love this thing!

Anyways, I put the heated tip into the tip tinner (you'll hear it sizzle) then wipe it across a damp sponge. I touch whatever solder I'm using at the time to the tip & wipe again & then I've got a nice clean iron ready for attack.

The tinner is like a compound made with powered solder & flux, it removes that crusty oxidization build up formed on the tip & returns it to a state that makes your repairs much easier.
Do you guys get solder blobs on the tip of your irons that you just cant shake, even aft er repeated wipings?
Do you get black crusty build up that causes dirty solder joints? Try the tinner, it'll make those problems go away.
Oh... & if you seem to be getting more solder sticking to your iron than the joint then that means you really need to try using some flux...

Regards,
Matt


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Posted by: Matt M <mattinthebox2000 <at> yahoo.com>


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Re: Soldering. Was: PG-380



Quote;

"A lot of good advice IMHO; although I seldom do much soldering any more.

BTW: I thought that lead was removed from solder a great number of
years ago. Not so???

As for tinning the gun/iron tip I just heat it up and stick it in the
tin of flux. Most of the time it comes out shiny.

Regards,
James... "

Most lead is gone from plumbing applications where potable water is required. It's not really a concern when used with electronics, at least not that I'm aware of.
The solder used for plumbing where water can & will be consumed is generally 95/5 tin/lead, so it's much much much safer than the old "lead" service pipes coming into old houses built way back when. lol

Ya, dipping the tip in flux can clean the tip.
I don't mind doing that with my newer "basic" $15 Weller iron like the one that most home depot's sell but I've got a really ginchy Weller station that's my baby.
The tips alone are quite pricey so I tend to take much better care of them due to the delicate work I can perform with it.

I've got a Weller WD 1M station, If you have the means I highly recommend picking one up.
I think they're affordable these days but when I purchased mine it was between $400 & $500 retail, very pricey but when you use it you'll instantly realize where the $ went.
Even a novice will instan tly receive magical soldering skills.
The caliber of work you can accomplish with this station is simply amazing.
The tip will heat instantly when picked up from the base & can reach temps over 700 degrees within seconds...

I used to do alot of TV/stereo repair, I've also replaced IC's in xboxes & iphones, along with all sorts of surface mount components.
Just the feel for the pencil tip & light silicone cord makes it possible to do repairs once thought to be impossible.
Not like I'm a spokesperson for the company but for any of you guys that do alot of soldering or would like to in the future, it's definitely worth checking out. It makes surface mount caps on these boards seem like child's play.
Its like the difference between throwing a bullet or shooting one from a gun....



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Posted by: Matt M <mattinthebox2000 <at> yahoo.com>


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Soldering. Was: PG-380

A lot of good advice IMHO; although I seldom do much  soldering any more.

BTW:  I thought that lead was removed from solder a great number of 
years ago.  Not so???

As for tinning the gun/iron tip I just heat it up and stick it in the 
tin of flux.  Most of the time it comes out shiny.

Regards,
James
.
.

>         Mon Dec 21, 2015 12:26 pm (PST) . Posted by:
>
>
>       "Matt M" mattinthebox2000
>       <mailto:mattinthebox2000 <at> yahoo.com?subject=Re%3A%20PG-380>
>
> Long time lurker here who just wanted to share my soldering experience.
> Now as Bob and some others have said...
> Right... use flux & dont be afraid to use plenty of it.
> Besides being a "cleaner" it also aids in heat transfer from the tip 
> of your iron to the solder you're trying to flow.
>
> You don't wanna gop it on but use it liberally, spread it all over 
> your contacts/pads (where you want the solder to flow).
> Just like with plumbing you want a solid bond without leaks (or when 
> dealing with electronics, intermittent connections) so you clean the 
> joint to ensure a good bond (cold solder joints can play hell with 
> electronic repairs).
> You use sand paper to make the joint physically clean & the flux 
> ensures your bond will be chemically clean.
> A little oil from a leaking cap can cause problems with the solder 
> sticking properly so that's where the flux is necessary to clean away 
> the oil & it also makes the solder flow like a pro (watch some youtube 
> videos of soldering IC's by hand).
> Since this isn't plumbing sanding shouldn't really be necessary as 
> these small boards are usually kept in conditions where oxidation 
> shouldn't be a big problem so just a little bit of flux should do just 
> fine (otherwise you risk damaging the traces on the board from sanding).
> The trick to a good bond is to get your iron up to temp then get in & 
> get out.
> Overheating the pad by taking too long can cause the copper trace to 
> lift off the board which complicates the repair so if you're new to 
> soldering then practice on old electronics till you get the hang of it 
> & your timing is where it needs to be.
>
> I get alotta boards out of TV's, stereo's, computers, etc from a junk 
> man friend of mine to experiment with.
> He says you can find electronic stuff in the trash just about anywhere.
> I have re-purposed lots of it (buttons, switches, potentiometers, film 
> caps, etc) & have modded many guitar pedals & stuff with all the junk 
> he brings me. I guess I'm doing my part to be "green" & recycle.
> It's important to get comfortable reflowing solder around transformers 
> & other components to get a feel for your equipment & what sorta time 
> is involved before jumping in both feet first & trashing your board. 
> Once you do that most all mods & repairs will be a breeze to do.
> A problem I have noticed when I hear about solder not flowing for 
> people is that most people don't ever re-tin their tip & that can 
> cause heat transfer issues as well.Stop in your nearby electronics 
> shop, they'll have tip tinner & get the proper solder (using plumbing 
> solder is like trying to thread a needle with a rope, it's too big).
> Grab a "kester pocket pack" of solder or equivalent.
> Most electronic solder should be around .75mm (.031") - 1.0mm (.040") 
> in diameter & be like 60/40% Tin/Lead.
> I use "Kester 44" which is 1.0mm (.040") diameter & is 66/44 Tin/Lead. 
> It's like $14usd for a 1lb roll & flows well.
> So... Grab some solder, some size 2 desoldering wick (if you don't 
> have a desoldering bulb or vacuum pump for removing excess solder) & a 
> small can of "tip tinner", it's like a compound that prepares your tip 
> if its caked up with carbon.Along with tinning the tip of your iron 
> you should also have a damp sponge at your station as well to remove 
> excess solder from the tip of your iron.
> Heat your iron till it's up to temp, then stick it in the tinner. Wipe 
> it clean on the damp sponge & your iron is ready to go.If you've 
> already removed the existing caps then flux the pads on the board, 
> place the desoldering wick on the pad then apply heat with your iron. 
> The flux will melt first then the solder should liquefy quickly after 
> then get absorbed into the wick. Remove the iron & wick while it's 
> still hot to prevent the wick from sticking to the board.Now apply 
> flux on "both" the new cap & the pad on the board.place the cap (in 
> the correct polarity) on the board & touch the iron to each solder 
> joint. It should bond quickly if prepped properly.
> Usually there's enough solder left on the pads when removing/replacing 
> existing components but In some cases a small dab of solder is necessary.
> You should only need to "tin" components when they're new, like a new 
> board or bare wire.
> Replace any other leaking caps or defective parts in the same manner.
>
> If you were patient & careful you should now have a working board again.
> Now that's just my opinion & it may vary from others but I've always 
> had good experiences using the above methods.Hope it will help some of 
> you guys & if you need me to clarify anything or have further 
> questions just holler & I'll answer to the best of my ability...
> Matt
>
> <mailto:mattinthebox2000 <at> yahoo.com?subject=Re%3A%20PG-380>

------------------------------------
Posted by: JAMES HARRISON <res075oh <at> gte.net>
------------------------------------

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Re: Re: PG-380



Long time lurker here who just wanted to share my soldering experience.

Now as Bob and some others have said...
Right... use flux & dont be afraid to use plenty of it.
Besides being a "cleaner" it also aids in heat transfer from the tip of your iron to the solder you're trying to flow.

You don't w anna gop it on but use it liberally, spread it all over your contacts/pads (where you want the solder to flow).
Just like with plumbing you want a solid bond without leaks (or when dealing with electronics, intermittent connections) so you clean the joint to ensure a good bond (cold solder joints can play hell with electronic repairs).

You use sand paper to make the joint physically clean & the flux ensures your bond will be chemically clean.
A little oil from a leaking cap can cause problems with the solder sticking properly so that's where the flux is necessary to clean away the oil & it also makes the solder flow like a pro (watch some youtube videos of soldering IC's by hand).

Since this isn't plumbing sanding shouldn't really be necessary as these small boards are usually kept in conditions where oxidation shouldn't be a big problem so just a little bit of flux should do just fine (otherwise you risk damaging the traces on the board from sanding).

The trick to a good bond is to get your iron up to te mp then get in & get out.
Overheating the pad by taking too long can cause the copper trace to lift off the board which complicates the repair so if you're new to soldering then practice on old electronics till you get the hang of it & your timing is where it needs to be.

I get alotta boards out of TV's, stereo's, computers, etc from a junk man friend of mine to experiment with.
He says you can find electronic stuff in the trash just about anywhere.
I have re-purposed lots of it (buttons, switches, potentiometers, film caps, etc) & have modded many guitar pedals & stuff with all the junk he brings me. I guess I'm doing my part to be "green" & recycle.

It's important to get comfortable reflowing solder around transformers & other components to get a feel for your equipment & what sorta time is involved before jumping in both feet first & trashing your board. Once you do that most all mods & repairs will be a breeze to do.

A problem I have noticed when I hear about solder not flowing for people is t hat most people don't ever re-tin their tip & that can cause heat transfer issues as well.
Stop in your nearby electronics shop, they'll have tip tinner & get the proper solder (using plumbing solder is like trying to thread a needle with a rope, it's too big).
Grab a "kester pocket pack" of solder or equivalent.
Most electronic solder should be around .75mm (.031") - 1.0mm (.040") in diameter & be like 60/40% Tin/Lead.
I use "Kester 44" which is 1.0mm (.040") diameter & is 66/44 Tin/Lead. It's like $14usd for a 1lb roll & flows well.
So... Grab some solder, some size 2 desoldering wick (if you don't have a desoldering bulb or vacuum pump for removing excess solder) & a small can of "tip tinner", it's like a compound that prepares your tip if its caked up with carbon.
Along with tinning the tip of your iron you should also have a damp sponge at your station as well to remove excess solder from the tip of your iron.

Heat your iron till it's up to temp, then stick it in the tinner. Wipe it clean on the damp sponge & your iron is ready to go.
If you've already removed the existing caps then flux the pads on the board, place the desoldering wick on the pad then apply heat with your iron. The flux will melt first then the solder should liquefy quickly after then get absorbed into the wick. Remove the iron & wick while it's still hot to prevent the wick from sticking to the board.
Now apply flux on "both" the new cap & the pad on the board.
place the cap (in the correct polarity) on the board & touch the iron to each solder joint. It should bond quickly if prepped properly.
Usually there's enough solder left on the pad s when removing/replacing existing components but In some cases a small dab of solder is necessary.
You should only need to "tin" components when they're new, like a new board or bare wire.

Replace any other leaking caps or defective parts in the same manner.

If you were patient & careful you should now have a working board again.

Now that's just my opinion & it ma y vary from others but I've always had good experiences using the above methods.
Hope it will help some of you guys & if you need me to clarify anything or have further questions just holler & I'll answer to the best of my ability...

Matt



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Posted by: Matt M <mattinthebox2000 <at> yahoo.com>


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PG380 Schematics



I'm trying to replace the cap C102. When can I find the schematic for board M380-MA2M. I need to find out where the negative of cap C102 connects.

Here is a Photo


https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/midiguitar/photos/albums/1903349928/lightbox/188916823?orderBy=ordinal&amp;sortOrder=asc&amp;photoFilter=ALL#zax/188916823



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Posted by: vicwilliams609 <at> yahoo.com


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PG-380



I'm trying to replace the cap C102. When can I find the schematic for board M380-MA2M. I need to find out where the negative of cap C102 connects



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Posted by: vicwilliams609 <at> yahoo.com


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Re: Re: Another sick PG-380



Look forward to the color posting!

Thanks
Ed Siedzik


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Posted by: Edward Siedzik <legacy2020 <at> verizon.net>


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Gmane