Karl | 1 Feb 02:09 2011
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Re: Ruling Against Health Care Law Evens Scorecard at 2-to-2

heh

 

From: dadl-ot-bounces-MhnCnTyFDG6cqzYg7KEe8g@public.gmane.org [mailto:dadl-ot-bounces-MhnCnTyFDG6cqzYg7KEe8g@public.gmane.org] On Behalf Of Bruce Geerdes
Sent: Monday, January 31, 2011 3:48 PM
To: DADL (off topic)
Subject: Re: [DADL-OT] Ruling Against Health Care Law Evens Scorecard at 2-to-2

 

On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 4:37 PM, Karl <karldswenson-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org> wrote:

(yes I know the article says what I said, but the other ruling against Obama was narrow to just the mandate, and this one went far beyond. That to me shakes up the 2-2 count…)

 

Oh yeah, I noticed the page title too, I just went with it.

 

Someone at the NY Times wants to make it seem like less of a set-back. :)

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Peter T. Chattaway | 1 Feb 02:28 2011
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Re: Fantastic Mr. Fox

On Mon, 31 Jan 2011, Bruce Geerdes wrote:
> I finished up "Fantastic Mr. Fox". Don't know how much kids would like 
> it, but *I* did!

The twins (who turn 5 on Friday) seem to like it, as my daughter recently 
played it while browsing the Netflix menu.  Our 3-year-old might not like 
it so much, though; I left the apartment while the movie was still on, but 
my wife tells me that he calmed down after the movie was over.

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Peter T. Chattaway | 1 Feb 02:28 2011
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Re: Red

On Mon, 31 Jan 2011, The Voice Of Objective Truth wrote:
> I may have to look into disc by mail as well as netflix (since selection 
> in Netflix Canada has some holes).

Only *some*?  :)

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nicholas a. evans | 1 Feb 02:47 2011
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Re: Red

Is Netflix not also "disc by mail" in Canada?  Or is its Canadian disc selection deficient?  In my experience, the disc selection is marvelous and vast.  I occasionally use Netflix's streaming service, especially since it was released for Wii. But I still primarily use the disc by mail, even sometimes when the movie is available for streaming, because the streaming version is usually missing subtitles.

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On Jan 31, 2011 8:29 PM, "Peter T. Chattaway" <petert <at> interchange.ubc.ca> wrote:
> On Mon, 31 Jan 2011, The Voice Of Objective Truth wrote:
>> I may have to look into disc by mail as well as netflix (since selection
>> in Netflix Canada has some holes).
>
> Only *some*? :)
>
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Lance McLain | 1 Feb 04:54 2011

Former Director of the CIA’s Counter-Terrorism Center: American Policy in the Middle East is Failing Because the U.S. Doesn't Believe in Democracy

Washington's Blog
January 31, 2011 7:56 PM
by George Washington

Former Director of the CIA’s Counter-Terrorism Center: American Policy in the Middle East is Failing Because the U.S. Doesn't Believe in Democracy


Robert Grenier - a 27-year veteran of the CIA’s Clandestine Service, and Director of the CIA’s Counter-Terrorism Center from 2004 to 2006 - writes today:

Events in the Middle East have slipped away from us. Having long since opted in favour of political stability over the risks and uncertainties of democracy, having told ourselves that the people of the region are not ready to shoulder the burdens of freedom, having stressed that the necessary underpinnings of self-government go well beyond mere elections, suddenly the US has nothing it can credibly say as people take to the streets to try to seize control of their collective destiny.

***

Our words betray us. US spokesmen stress the protesters' desire for jobs and for economic opportunity, as though that were the full extent of their aspirations. They entreat the wobbling, repressive governments in the region to "respect civil society", and the right of the people to protest peacefully, as though these thoroughly discredited autocrats were actually capable of reform.

They urge calm and restraint. One listens in vain, however, for a ringing endorsement of freedom, or for a statement of encouragement to those willing to risk everything to assert their rights and their human dignity - values which the US nominally regards as universal.

***

There are two things which must be stressed in this regard.

The first is the extent to which successive US administrations have consistently betrayed a lack of faith in the efficacy of America's democratic creed, the extent to which the US government has denied the essentially moderating influence of democratic accountability to the people, whether in Algeria in 1992 or in Palestine in 2006.

The failure of the US to uphold its stated commitment to democratic values therefore goes beyond a simple surface hypocrisy, beyond the exigencies of great-power interests, to suggest a fundamental lack of belief in democracy as a means of promoting enlightened, long-term US interests in peace and stability.

***

The US's entire frame of reference in the region is hopelessly outdated, and no longer has meaning: As if the street protesters in Tunis and Cairo could possibly care what the US thinks or says; as if the political and economic reform which president Obama stubbornly urges on Mubarak while Cairo burns could possibly satisfy those risking their lives to overcome nearly three decades of his repression; as if the two-state solution in Palestine for which the US has so thoroughly compromised itself, and for whose support the US administration still praises Mubarak, has even the slightest hope of realisation; as if the exercise in brutal and demeaning collective punishment inflicted upon Gaza, and for whose enforcement the US, again, still credits Mubarak could possibly produce a decent or just outcome; as if the US refusal to deal with Hezbollah as anything but a terrorist organisation bore any relation to current political realities in the Levant.

Machiavelli once wrote that princes should see to it that they are either respected or feared; what they must avoid at all cost is to be despised. To have made itself despised as irrelevant: That is the legacy of US faithlessness and wilful blindness in the Middle East.

For background, see this and this.


Sent from my iPhone
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Re: Red

> On Jan 31, 2011 8:29 PM, "Peter T. Chattaway" <petert@...>
> wrote:

>> Only *some*? :)

I acknowledge the understatement :)

On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 8:47 PM, nicholas a. evans
<nicholas.evans@...> wrote:
> Is Netflix not also "disc by mail" in Canada?  Or is its Canadian disc
> selection deficient?  In my experience, the disc selection is marvelous and
> vast.  I occasionally use Netflix's streaming service, especially since it
> was released for Wii. But I still primarily use the disc by mail, even
> sometimes when the movie is available for streaming, because the streaming
> version is usually missing subtitles.

In Canada Netflix is only streaming.  There are a few existing
disc-by-mail services, but they don't do streaming.  I haven't looked
in to any because I was unsure I'd make enough use of the services to
get my money's worth, and I really liked the local indie video store
that is now closing.

I think key for me in the disc-by-mail will be selection and amount of
Blu-Ray -- any new release should be Blu-Ray.

Jeremy

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Lance McLain | 1 Feb 06:11 2011

Re: Red

My understanding is that Netflix will soon be charged for all their  
bandwidth usage for streaming video in Canada.  Could be why they are  
limiting their streaming selections.
Subscription costs will likely go up soon too.

regards,
-Lance

On Jan 31, 2011, at 10:25 PM, The Voice Of Objective Truth wrote:

>> On Jan 31, 2011 8:29 PM, "Peter T. Chattaway"
<petert@... 
>> >
>> wrote:
>
>>> Only *some*? :)
>
> I acknowledge the understatement :)
>
> On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 8:47 PM, nicholas a. evans
> <nicholas.evans@...> wrote:
>> Is Netflix not also "disc by mail" in Canada?  Or is its Canadian  
>> disc
>> selection deficient?  In my experience, the disc selection is  
>> marvelous and
>> vast.  I occasionally use Netflix's streaming service, especially  
>> since it
>> was released for Wii. But I still primarily use the disc by mail,  
>> even
>> sometimes when the movie is available for streaming, because the  
>> streaming
>> version is usually missing subtitles.
>
> In Canada Netflix is only streaming.  There are a few existing
> disc-by-mail services, but they don't do streaming.  I haven't looked
> in to any because I was unsure I'd make enough use of the services to
> get my money's worth, and I really liked the local indie video store
> that is now closing.
>
> I think key for me in the disc-by-mail will be selection and amount of
> Blu-Ray -- any new release should be Blu-Ray.
>
> Jeremy
>
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Lance McLain | 1 Feb 06:29 2011

Canada gets first, bitter dose of metered Internet


This will impact Netflix streaming!
-L

---------------------
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/01/canada-gets-first-bitter-dose-of-metered-internet-billing.ars

200GB to 25GB: Canada gets first, bitter dose of metered Internet

Metered Internet usage (also called "Usage-Based Billing") is coming to Canada, and it's going to cost Internet users. While an advance guard of Canadians are expressing creative outrage at the prospect of having to pay inflated prices for Internet use charged by the gigabyte, the consequences probably haven't set in for most consumers. Now, however, independent Canadian ISPs are publishing their revised data plans, and they aren't pretty.

"Like our customers, and Canadian internet users everywhere, we are not happy with this new development," wrote the Ontario-based indie ISP TekSavvy in a recent e-mail message to its subscribers.

But like it or not, the Canadian Radio-Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved UBB for the incumbent carrier Bell Canada in September. Competitive ISPs, which connect to Canada's top telco for last-mile copper connections to customers, will also be metered by Bell. Even though the CRTC gave these ISPs a 15 percent discount this month (TekSavvy asked for 50 percent), it's still going to mean a real adjustment for consumers.

This is going to hurt

Starting on March 1, Ontario TekSavvy members who subscribed to the 5Mbps plan have a new usage cap of 25GB, "substantially down from the 200GB or unlimited deals TekSavvy was able to offer before the CRTC's decision to impose usage based billing," the message added.

By way of comparison, Comcast here in the United States has a 250GB data cap. Looks like lots of Canadians can kiss that kind of high ceiling goodbye. And going over will cost you: according to TekSavvy, the CRTC put data overage rates at CAN $1.90 per gigabyte for most of Canada, and $2.35 for the country's French-speaking region.

Bottom line: no more unlimited buffet. TekSavvy users who bought the "High Speed Internet Premium" plan at $31.95 now get 175GB less per month. 

"Extensive web surfing, sharing music, video streaming, downloading and playing games, online shopping and email," could put users over the 25GB cap, TekSavvy warns. Also, watch out "power users that use multiple computers, smartphones, and game consoles at the same time."

You need "protection"

Here's the "good" news: TekSavvy users can now buy "insurance," defined as "a recurring subscription fee that provides you with additional monthly usage." For Ontario it's $4.75 for 40GB of additional data (sorry, but the unused data can't be forwarded to the next month).

There are also "usage vault" plans—payments made in advance for extra data. Consumers can buy vault data for $1.90/GB up to 300GB in any month.

Where once TekSavvy consumers could purchase High Speed Internet Premium at a monthly base usage of 200GB for $31.95 a month, now they can get about half of that data (if they buy two units of insurance) at $41.45 a month.

TekSavvy's DSL rates: now and after March 1

Very questionable

Starting to hate this? TekSavvy hates it, too.

"The ostensible, theoretical reason behind UBB is to conserve capacity, but that issue is very questionable," noted the ISP's CEO Rocky Gaudrault on TekSavvy's news page. "One certain result though, is that Bell will make much more profit on its Internet service, and discourage Canadians from watching TV and movies on the internet instead of CTV, which Bell now owns."

Given these dramatic changes, and the fact that ISPs around the world have made clear they wouldn't mind implementing similar schemes, it's no wonder that high-bandwidth businesses are fighting back. Last week, for instance, Netflix started publishing graphs of ISP performance in both the US and Canada, and it plans to update them monthly.

Netflix is also stepping up the war of words against ISPs who try to implement low caps and high overage fees:

"Wired ISPs have large fixed costs of building and maintaining their last mile network of residential cable and fiber. The ISPs' costs, however, to deliver a marginal gigabyte, which is about an hour of viewing, from one of our regional interchange points over their last mile wired network to the consumer is less than a penny, and falling, so there is no reason that pay-per-gigabyte is economically necessary. Moreover, at $1 per gigabyte over wired networks, it would be grossly overpriced."

The big question now is how these kind of billing changes will impact 'Net consumption patterns. Many subscribers use minimal data, but that's changing as Internet video becomes the norm. If these new plans simply discourage data hogs from backing up their 120GB pirated movie collection over the 'Net every night, there's no sleep to be lost. But if they scare consumers away from legitimate non-ISP affiliated movie and content sharing sites, that should be a firebell concern to consumers, entrepreneurs, and regulators.

And not only in Canada.

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Re: Red

On Tue, Feb 1, 2011 at 12:11 AM, Lance McLain <lance@...> wrote:
> My understanding is that Netflix will soon be charged for all their
> bandwidth usage for streaming video in Canada.  Could be why they are
> limiting their streaming selections.
> Subscription costs will likely go up soon too.

Slight misunderstanding.  The reason for the lower selection in Canada
is that the same content is licensed to different distributors in
Canada and those distributors still see netflix as a threat to their
DVD sales and TV/pay-per-view income.

As far as bandwidth goes, I don't believe they are trying to charge
Netflix, but they are screwing over their consumers.  The additional
bandwidth "costs" are being passed on to consumers.  I'll go into
details in my response to the article you posted on the situation --
the article is correct, I'll just add some personal/local details.

Jeremy

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Peter T. Chattaway | 1 Feb 15:59 2011
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Re: Red

On Mon, 31 Jan 2011, The Voice Of Objective Truth wrote:
> On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 8:47 PM, nicholas a. evans wrote:

>> Is Netflix not also "disc by mail" in Canada?  Or is its Canadian disc 
>> selection deficient? . . .
>
> In Canada Netflix is only streaming.

Yeah, we didn't have Netflix *at all* until a couple months ago, when they 
introduced the streaming-only option about a month or two before they 
introduced it in the States.  But there are still tons of films and TV 
shows that are streamable in the States and not in Canada.

Not that I'm complaining, mind.  I've already caught up on a number of 
films -- foreign, documentary, etc. -- and the service has been *really* 
useful for entertaining the kids and finding new programs for them that 
I'd never even known *existed* prior to getting Netflix (shows like 
Dinosaur Train, Kipper, Angelina Ballerina, WordWorld, etc.).

> There are a few existing disc-by-mail services, but they don't do 
> streaming.  I haven't looked in to any because I was unsure I'd make 
> enough use of the services to get my money's worth . . .

Heh.  The other day I got an e-mail from Videomatica.ca reminding me that 
I've been holding on to a couple discs so long that I might have saved 
money by just buying those discs in the first place.

> I think key for me in the disc-by-mail will be selection and amount of 
> Blu-Ray -- any new release should be Blu-Ray.

I find it's harder for me to get around to watching Blu-Ray discs, though, 
because I've only got the one player (the PS3) and it's usually being used 
by the wife or kids or someone.  At least with DVDs I still have the 
option of watching the disc on my laptop, etc.
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