Peter T. Chattaway | 1 Dec 08:11 2007
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pillow talk / lover come back / send me no flowers

So last weekend I got a three-pack of DVDs out of the library and watched
'em all.  They all star Rock Hudson and Doris Day and Tony Randall, and
they were all produced between 1959 and 1964.  Has anybody here seen 'em?

My goodness, the more I see movies produced back then, the less seriously
I can take all those social-conservative pundits who rant and whine about
how wonderful and pure Hollywood was until the Catholic Legion of Decency
lost control and the ratings system was introduced in the late 1960s.

Pillow Talk -- produced in 1959, the year Ben-Hur came out -- and Lover
Come Back both star Rock Hudson as a wildly promiscuous and "oversexed"
man who pretends to be gay or virginal or both in order to win the pity of
the "undersexed" Doris Day character, and thereby seduce her.  In the
latter film, Day takes Hudson to a strip club and gawks at the offscreen
stripper's "muscle control" (as Hudson puts it).  (The fact that Rock
Hudson was publicly revealed to be gay over 20 years later definitely
makes these films even funnier than they were at the time, but there is
*plenty* in the surface text that would have had social conservatives
fuming back then, you'd think, even *without* that subtext.)

In Send Me No Flowers, meanwhile, Hudson and Day play a happily married
couple, but she begins to suspect that he's having an affair, due to a
misunderstanding.  (He's a hypochondriac, he thinks he's dying, he talks
about arranging for her to get another husband, she thinks he's trying to
make a swinger out of her, and somewhere along the way there's a joke
about Hudson buying a plot at the cemetery for himself, his wife, and
"another man".  Once again, the subtext makes it even funnier.)

I have always known, of course, that movies of this era had their share of
innuendo and whatnot.  But these films go way beyond innuendo -- and in
(Continue reading)

Lucas John | 1 Dec 09:57 2007
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This is the week that was in matters musical

This is the week that was in matters musical …
1935, Richard Wayne Penniman is born in Macon, Georgia … two decades later he will make a huge splash in the rock ’n’ roll realm where he will be better known as Little Richard, a mightily pompadoured, sexually ambiguous piano player belting out a series of hits that gets teens shaking tail feathers from coast to coast … he will go on to influence countless rockers, notably among them Paul McCartney, with a wild vocal style that includes his trademark "wooo" … over the coming years he will oscillate between the sacred and the profane, sometimes forsaking rock ’n’ roll for the ministry before falling back on the devil’s music …
1956, an impromptu jam results when Elvis, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Carl Perkins all descend on Sun Records Studios in Memphis … the studio originally had been booked for Perkins, who planned to cut some tracks with his brothers … when the other luminaries drop by, a party atmosphere prevails and the event turns into a day-long music jamboree, much of which is captured on tape as the participants have a rollicking good time with country, gospel, and rockabilly tunes … due to contractual issues the tapes remain in the can until 1981 when Charly Records in England puts out an LP with session highlights, crediting it to The Million Dollar Quartet—a name coined by a Memphis newsman who covered the original get-together … though Cash is pictured on the cover, he is not audible on any of the tracks … word has it Mrs. Cash showed up during the session and insisted Johnny go shopping with her …
1957, Ed Sullivan airs the TV debuts of Sam Cooke, singing "You Send Me" and Buddy Holly and the Crickets performing "That’ll Be the Day" …
1965, the infamous blue flame strikes Keith Richards down on a stage in Sacramento when he grabs an ungrounded mic … the indestructible Stone is on his feet and performing again inside of seven minutes … this same week The Byrds find themselves ruling the pop chart with "Turn! Turn! Turn!" … the song, penned by Pete Seeger, incorporates verses from the Book of Ecclesiastes …
1967, pop singer Jimmie F. Rodgers cracks up his car and is found with a fractured skull … he will survive but his career is over …
1968, Elvis’ "comeback" TV special—titled simply "Elvis"—airs on NBC … Colonel Tom Parker wanted Elvis to do the usual smaltzy cornball Christmas special, but Elvis, who could see his musical legacy slipping away, wanted to let fans know he was still raw and vital … and he delivers … leather suited and sweaty on a small stage in front of adoring fans, Elvis shows everyone he’s still the … well, you k now …
1969, AT&T backs out as a sponsor of a Simon and Garfunkel TV special when it learns that the duo plans to air clips of Robert Kennedy’s funeral and Vietnam war footage …
1971, The Montreux Casino in Geneva, Switzerland, catches fire during a show by the Mothers of Invention, inspiring Deep Purple’s "Smoke on the Water" … the proto-metal band watches the fire from their hotel across Lake Geneva, hence the song’s title … its crunching four-note riff, harmonized in parallel fourths by guitarist Ritchie Blackmore, becomes one of the most cherished figures in all of rock riffdom with garage rockers everywhere laying it down endlessly …
1972, Carly Simon releases "You’re So Vain," a song that sets the whole country to wondering exactly who is so insufferably vain … candidates for the post include recent Carly conquests Mick Jagger (who sang on the record), Cat Stevens, Kris Kristofferson, and Warren Beatty … w hen asked if she’s "gone with" Beatty, she says, "Hasn’t everybody? … I felt I was one among thousands at that point—it hadn’t reached, you know, the populations of small countries" … in 2003 Carly Simon volunteers to tell the highest bidder at a charity auction who the song is actually about, but only if the winner will keep it confidential … NBC exec Dick Ebersol wins with a $50,000 bid and he’s not talking …
1976, the Sex Pistols’ Glenn Matlock uses the "F" word during an English TV interview and the resulting uproar proves that the Brits can be every bit as priggish and sanctimonious as the Yanks … most of the Pistols’ upcoming gigs are canceled and by the next month they can’t book a date anywhere in the U.K. …
1979, 11 fans are trampled to death at a Who show in Cincinnati …
1986, Annie Lennox, lead singer for Eurythmics, gets so carried away at a concert in Birmingham, England, that she rips off her bra, whi ch is the only thing covering her breasts … this does not cause a national scandal …
1993, revered rock weirdo, musical wizard, and spokesman for lyrical freedom Frank Zappa meets his demise from prostate cancer at the age of 53 …
1994, in the course of a robbery, rapper Tupac Shakur is shot five times outside a New York recording studio and lives to tell the tale...just two days later he is convicted of sexually abusing a woman …
1996, Tiny Tim, born Herbert Khaury—who made a career of singing ’20s and ’30s tunes in a decidedly unmasculine warbling falsetto accompanied by his ukulele—dies of a heart condition at a Minneapolis hospital after collapsing while performing his signature song "Tip-Toe Thru’ The Tulips With Me" at a nearby women’s club meeting …
2003, The Concert for George, a tribute to George Harrison, takes place at Royal Albert Hall in London … the star-studded lineup includes Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Jeff Lynne, Ravi Shankar, Billy Preston, and many more …
2006, Oklahoma City honors homegrown band The Flaming Lips by naming an alley after them … Chief Lip Wayne Coyne says, "So many bands despise their hometowns … it never felt that way to us. Oklahoma City never rejected us." … on the business end of the music biz, the handwritten lyrics for The Beatles’ "Maxwell’s Silver Hammer" fetch $192,000 at auction in New York … Christies also gets $168,000 for a former Hendrix Strat while a collection of memorabilia belonging to former Dylan girlfriend Suze Rotolo garners $116,640 …
And that was the week that was.
[Compiled by the Musician’s Friend copywriting staff]

Arrivals:

November 29: jazz composer, lyricist, and pianist Billy Strayhorn (1915), Merle Travis (1917), John Mayall (1933), Chuck Mangione (1940), Dennis Doherty of The Mamas and the Papas ( 1941), Felix Cavaliere of The Young Rascals (1943), Boston’s Barry Goudreau (1951), Michael Dempsey of The Cure (1958), Steve Scott of Bleach (1963), Wallace Buchanan of Jarimoquai (1965), Jonathan Knight of New Kids on the Block (1968)
November 30: Pablo Casals (1876), slide guitarist Robert Nighthawk (1909), bluesman Brownie McGhee (1915), Dick Clark (1929), Johnny Horton (1929), Paul Stookey of Peter, Paul & Mary (1937), Ray Thomas of The Moody Blues (1941), Lee Greenwood (1942), Leo Lyons of Ten Years After (1943), Rob Grill of Grassroots (1944), Deep Purple’s Roger Glover (1945), Cozy Powell of The Jeff Beck Group (1947), Garry Tallent of The E Street Band (1949), Kenneth K.K. Downing of Judas Priest (1951), Shuggie Otis (1953), The Little River Band’s George McArdale (1954), Billy Idol (1955), June Pointer of The Pointer Sisters (1956), Japan’s Richard Barbieri (1957), John Ashton of the Psychedelic Furs (1957), Stacey Q (1958), Simon LeBon of D uran Duran (1958), Jalil of Whodini (1963), Paul Wheeler of Icehouse (1965), Scott Weiland (1967), Des’ree (1968), Glen Phillips of Toad the Wet Sprocket (1970), Mindy McCready (1975), Kelly Osbourne (1984)
December 1: crooner Matt Monro (1932), soul singer Billy Paul (1934), Lou Rawls (1935), Eric Bloom of Blue Oyster Cult (1944), John Densmore of The Doors (1944), Bette Midler (1945), Gilbert O’Sullivan (1946), Jaco Pastorius (1951), Japan’s Steve Jansen (1959), Brad Delson of Linkin Park (1977)
December 2: gospel-blues pioneer Pop Staples (1915), Tom McGuinness of Manfred Mann (1941), Michael McDonald (1952), Joe Henry (1960), Def Leppard’s Rick Savage (1960), Hanoi Rocks drummer Razzle born Nicholas Dingley (1963), Nate Mendel of Foo Fighters (1968), Jay-Z (1970), Nelly Furtado (1978), Britney Spears (1981)
December 3: D.J. William "Hoss" Allen (1922), pop crooner Andy Williams (1930), Ralph McTell (1944), Ozz y Osbourne (1948), "Buffalo" Bruce Barlow of Commander Cody (1948), Mickey Thomas of Starship (1949), Molly Hatchet’s Duane Roland (1952), Steve Forbert (1955), Montell Jordan (1971)
December 4: film singer Deanna Durbin (1922), New Orleans R&B singer Lee Dorsey (1924), jazz drummer Denis Charles (1933), blues guitarist Larry Davis (1936), Freddy Cannon aka Anthony Picariello (1940), Chris Hillman of The Byrds (1942), Bob Mosely of Moby Grape (1942), Beach Boy Dennis Wilson (1944), Southside Johnny (1948), Gary Rossington of Lynyrd Skynyrd (1951), Bob Griffin of The BoDeans (1959), Vinnie Dombroskie of Sponge (1962)
December 5: blues legend Sonny Boy Williamson II born Aleck Ford Miller and AKA Rice Miller (1899), New Orleans sax man Alvin "Red" Tyler (1925), Reverend James Cleveland (1931), Little Richard (1935), J.J. Cale born Jean Jacques Cale (1938), Andy Kim (1946), Jim Messina (1947), Great White’s Jack Russell (1960), Johnny Rzeznik of Goo Goo Dolls (1965)

Departures:

November 29: George Harrison (2001), David "Butch" McDade of The Amazing Rhythm Aces (1998), Giacomo Puccini (1924)
November 30: jazz guitarist Charlie Byrd (1999), Tiny Tim (1996), Doors producer Paul Rothschild (1995), crossover country singer David Houston (1993)
December 1: jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli (1997), Epic Soundtracks (Kevin Godfrey) of Swell Maps (1997), the "Unforgettable" songwriter Irving Gordon (1996), metal singer Ray Gillen (1993), balladeer Harry Ray (1992), Lee Dorsey (1986), Westside Chicago bluesman Magic Sam aka Sam Maghett (1969), bluegrass guitarist Carter Stanley (1966)
December 2: singer-songwriter Kevin Coyne (2004), guitarist-composer Michael Hedges (1997), Aaron Copland (1990), folk singer David Blue (1982)
December 3: jazz pianist Mal Waldron (2002), songwriter Phil M edley (1997)
December 4: MC5 fret man and husband of Patti Smith, Fred "Sonic" Smith (1994), Frank Zappa (1993), Deep Purple’s Tommy Bolin (1976)
December 5: tenor saxist Bob Berg (2002), Douglas Hopkins of The Gin Blossoms (1993), New Orleans session sax man David Lastie (1987), multi-instrumentalist jazz behemoth Rahsaan Roland Kirk (1977)


Peace in the Valley, Johnny c)>:o

http://www.humboldtmusic.com/johnklucas (UPDATED 10/22/07)
http://www.myspace.com/johnklucas
http://cdbaby.com/cd/johnklucas

I'm now available on iTunes
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewAlbum?playListId=210456136

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Michael D. Findlay | 2 Dec 17:24 2007
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Looks like a whitewash to me

-Stop Taser Cop Acted "Reasonably"

Utah Officials Say Trooper Felt Threatened In Incident Widely Viewed On YouTube Website

 
(AP) A Utah trooper who used a Taser to subdue a stubborn motorist who was walking away from him during a traffic stop felt threatened and acted reasonably, state officials said Friday.

Trooper Jon Gardner remains on leave, primarily for his safety, after numerous anonymous threats were made against him, said Supt. Lance Davenport of the Utah Highway Patrol.

Gardner twice zapped Jared Massey with a Taser when the driver walked away and refused to sign a speeding ticket on Sept. 14. The incident was recorded on Gardner's dashboard camera. Massey filed a public-records request and posted the video on YouTube, which said it has been viewed more than 1 million times.

"We found that Trooper Gardner's actions were lawful and reasonable under the circumstances," Davenport said at a news conference, joined by Scott Duncan, commissioner of the UHP's parent agency, the Utah Department of Public Safety.

The investigation was conducted by officials in the Department of Public Safety, which oversees the highway patrol. The officials have asked the Utah attorney general's office to also review the case to determine if laws were broken.

Massey was not at the news conference and could not immediately be reached for comment.

The video showed Massey arguing about whether he was exceeding the speed limit on U.S. 40 in eastern Utah. Massey got out and walked to the rear of his vehicle. The trooper pulled out his Taser when the driver tried to return to his seat.

Massey shrieked, fell and said: "Officer, I really don't know what you're doing."

"Face down! Face down! Put your hands behind your back," Gardner said.

When Massey's wife emerged from the passenger side, the trooper ordered her to get back in - "or you're going to jail, too." Moments later, when another officer arrived, one of them said, "Oh, he took a ride with the Taser."

Davenport said that comment was inappropriate.

Officials said Gardner could have issued the ticket without Massey's signature. The investigation found use of the Taser was justified because Massey had turned his back and put a hand near his pocket, Davenport said.

"For a law-enforcement officer, that is a very, very scary situation," he said.

Nonetheless, the trooper now realizes that other options were available, Davenport said.

The UHP has received thousands of phone calls and e-mails since the video was posted online, many of them critical of the trooper. There also have been online threats against Gardner.

"I think mostly it's people blowing off steam, and that's fine," Sgt. Jeff Nigbur, a UHP spokesman, said Friday before the investigation's conclusions were announced. "But you can't say you're going to endanger somebody's life."

He said there was no evidence that the trooper's life is in danger. Massey has pleaded for the online threats to stop.

Tasers use compressed nitrogen to fire two barbed darts that can penetrate clothing to deliver a 50,000-volt shock to immobilize people.

Tasers are manufactured by Taser International of Scottsdale.


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Michael D. Findlay | 2 Dec 19:43 2007
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Lance is right

I apologize for ever doubting you.  I'd forgotten about this but it is quite
chilling.  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm5PC7z79-8

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Michael D. Findlay | 2 Dec 20:02 2007
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Bush's legacy?

Technology Vindicates Morality
By Charles Krauthammer
Friday, November 30, 2007

"If human embryonic stem cell research does not make you at least a little
bit uncomfortable, you have not thought about it enough."

-- James A. Thomson

WASHINGTON -- A decade ago, Thomson was the first to isolate human embryonic
stem cells. Last week, he (and Japan's Shinya Yamanaka) announced one of the
great scientific breakthroughs since the discovery of DNA: an embryo-free
way to produce genetically matched stem cells.

Even a scientist who cares not a whit about the morality of embryo
destruction will adopt this technique because it is so simple and powerful.
The embryonic stem cell debate is over.

Which allows a bit of reflection on the storm that has raged ever since the
August 2001 announcement of President Bush's stem cell policy. The verdict
is clear: Rarely has a president -- so vilified for a moral stance -- been
so thoroughly vindicated.

Why? Precisely because he took a moral stance. Precisely because, as Thomson
puts it, Bush was made "a little bit uncomfortable" by the implications of
embryonic experimentation. Precisely because he therefore decided that some
moral line had to be drawn.

In doing so, he invited unrelenting demagoguery by an unholy trinity of
Democratic politicians, research scientists and patient advocates who
insisted that anyone who would put any restriction on the destruction of
human embryos could be acting only for reasons of cynical politics rooted in
dogmatic religiosity -- a "moral ayatollah," as Sen. Tom Harkin so
scornfully put it.

Bush got it right. Not because he necessarily drew the line in the right
place. I have long argued that a better line might have been drawn --
between using doomed and discarded fertility-clinic embryos created
originally for reproduction (permitted) and using embryos created solely to
be disassembled for their parts, as in research cloning (prohibited). But
what Bush got right was to insist, in the face of enormous popular and
scientific opposition, on drawing a line at all, on requiring that
scientific imperative be balanced by moral considerations.

History will look at Bush's 2001 speech and be surprised how balanced and
measured it was, how much respect it gave to the other side. Read it. Here
was a presidential policy pronouncement that so finely and fairly drew out
the case for both sides that until the final few minutes of his speech, you
had no idea where the policy would end up.

Bush finally ended up doing nothing to hamper private research into
embryonic stem cells and pledging federal monies to support the study of
existing stem cell lines -- but refusing federal monies for research on stem
cell lines produced by newly destroyed embryos.

The president's policy recognized that this might cause problems. The
existing lines might dry up, prove inadequate or become corrupted. Bush
therefore appointed a President's Council on Bioethics to oversee ongoing
stem cell research and evaluate how his restrictions were affecting research
and what means might be found to circumvent ethical obstacles.

More vilification. The mainstream media and the scientific establishment saw
this as a smokescreen to cover his fundamentalist, obscurantist,
anti-scientific -- the list of adjectives was endless -- tracks. "Some
observers," wrote The Washington Post's Rick Weiss, "say the president's
council is politically stacked."

I sat on the council for five years. It was one of the most ideologically
balanced bioethics commission in the history of this country. It consisted
of scientists, ethicists, theologians, philosophers, physicians -- and
others (James Q. Wilson, Francis Fukuyama and me among them) of a secular
bent not committed to one school or the other.

That balance of composition was reflected in the balance in the reports
issued by the council -- documents of sophistication and nuance that
reflected the divisions both within the council and within the nation in a
way that respectfully presented the views of all sides. One recommendation
was to support research that might produce stem cells through
"de-differentiation" of adult cells, thus bypassing the creation of human
embryos.

That Holy Grail has now been achieved. Largely because of the genius of
Thomson and Yamanaka. And also because of the astonishing good fortune that
nature requires only four injected genes to turn an ordinary adult skin cell
into a magical stem cell that can become bone or brain or heart or liver.

But for one more reason as well. Because the moral disquiet that James
Thomson always felt -- and that George Bush forced the country to confront
-- helped lead him and others to find some ethically neutral way to produce
stem cells. Providence then saw to it that the technique be so elegant and
beautiful that scientific reasons alone will now incline even the most
willful researchers to leave the human embryo alone.

Charles Krauthammer is a 1987 Pulitzer Prize winner, 1984 National Magazine
Award winner, and a columnist for The Washington Post since 1985.

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karl | 2 Dec 21:05 2007
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Re: Looks like a whitewash to me

I think in context it is accurate.

They are saying at the moment he fired the taser, he had provocation.  The 
guy was walking away, and had his hand reaching to his pocket, which can be 
considered threatening actions.

They did not address why he pulled the taser initially, and all sorts of 
other problems.

rather then a report on the incident as a whole it address a few isolated 
pieces.

The article is wrong in one important area.

"The trooper pulled out his Taser when the driver tried to
return to his seat. "

Sorry, he pulled the taser the minute massey got out of the vehicle, at his 
orders.

As I said, the officer made many mistakes that need to be addressed.  This 
report only addresses one of them, and is technically accurate. At the very 
moment he tased the guy he was justified.

What needs to be addressed is what happened before.

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Michael D. Findlay" <mdfindlay@...>
To: "'DADL (off topic)'" <dadl-ot@...>
Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2007 8:24 AM
Subject: [DADL-OT] Looks like a whitewash to me

HYPERLINK
"http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/12/01/national/main3561663.shtml?source
=RSSattr=HOME_3561663"http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/12/01/national/mai
n3561663.shtml?source=RSSattr=HOME_3561663

-Stop Taser Cop Acted "Reasonably"

Utah Officials Say Trooper Felt Threatened In Incident Widely Viewed On
YouTube Website

(AP) A Utah trooper who used a Taser to subdue a stubborn motorist who was
walking away from him during a traffic stop felt threatened and acted
reasonably, state officials said Friday.

Trooper Jon Gardner remains on leave, primarily for his safety, after
numerous anonymous threats were made against him, said Supt. Lance Davenport
of the Utah Highway Patrol.

Gardner twice zapped Jared Massey with a Taser when the driver walked away
and refused to sign a speeding ticket on Sept. 14. The incident was recorded
on Gardner's dashboard camera. Massey filed a public-records request and
posted the video on YouTube, which said it has been viewed more than 1
million times.

"We found that Trooper Gardner's actions were lawful and reasonable under
the circumstances," Davenport said at a news conference, joined by Scott
Duncan, commissioner of the UHP's parent agency, the Utah Department of
Public Safety.

The investigation was conducted by officials in the Department of Public
Safety, which oversees the highway patrol. The officials have asked the Utah
attorney general's office to also review the case to determine if laws were
broken.

Massey was not at the news conference and could not immediately be reached
for comment.

The video showed Massey arguing about whether he was exceeding the speed
limit on U.S. 40 in eastern Utah. Massey got out and walked to the rear of
his vehicle. The trooper pulled out his Taser when the driver tried to
return to his seat.

Massey shrieked, fell and said: "Officer, I really don't know what you're
doing."

"Face down! Face down! Put your hands behind your back," Gardner said.

When Massey's wife emerged from the passenger side, the trooper ordered her
to get back in - "or you're going to jail, too." Moments later, when another
officer arrived, one of them said, "Oh, he took a ride with the Taser."

Davenport said that comment was inappropriate.

Officials said Gardner could have issued the ticket without Massey's
signature. The investigation found use of the Taser was justified because
Massey had turned his back and put a hand near his pocket, Davenport said.

"For a law-enforcement officer, that is a very, very scary situation," he
said.

Nonetheless, the trooper now realizes that other options were available,
Davenport said.

The UHP has received thousands of phone calls and e-mails since the video
was posted online, many of them critical of the trooper. There also have
been online threats against Gardner.

"I think mostly it's people blowing off steam, and that's fine," Sgt. Jeff
Nigbur, a UHP spokesman, said Friday before the investigation's conclusions
were announced. "But you can't say you're going to endanger somebody's
life."

He said there was no evidence that the trooper's life is in danger. Massey
has pleaded for the online threats to stop.

Tasers use compressed nitrogen to fire two barbed darts that can penetrate
clothing to deliver a 50,000-volt shock to immobilize people.

Tasers are manufactured by Taser International of Scottsdale.

© MMVII The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be
published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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karl | 2 Dec 21:10 2007
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Re: Lance is right

Yep.  The state of Louisiana and the city of New Orleans have a lot to 
answer for.

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Michael D. Findlay" <mdfindlay@...>
To: "'DADL (off topic)'" <dadl-ot@...>
Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2007 10:43 AM
Subject: [DADL-OT] Lance is right

>I apologize for ever doubting you.  I'd forgotten about this but it is 
>quite
> chilling.
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm5PC7z79-8
>
>
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> 11/26/2007
> 10:50 AM
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Lance McLain | 2 Dec 21:41 2007

Re: Lance is right

Uh oh...I think I better re-evaluate my position.  :)

I have written before about the militarization of our culture.  It  
does appear to me that the militarization of disaster operations in  
recent years is another example of that.

I suppose these actions set some kind of precedent.  There certainly  
doesn't seem to have been much public outcry.

regards,
-Lane

On Dec 2, 2007, at 12:43 PM, Michael D. Findlay wrote:

> I apologize for ever doubting you.  I'd forgotten about this but it  
> is quite
> chilling.
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm5PC7z79-8
>
>
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.503 / Virus Database: 269.16.7/1152 - Release Date:  
> 11/26/2007
> 10:50 AM
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Regards,
-Lance

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Lance McLain | 2 Dec 21:49 2007

Re: Lance is right

Weren't those National Guard?  I agree that most of the blame lies  
with the State and City, but I don't think you can leave the Feds out  
of this either.

regards,
-Lance

On Dec 2, 2007, at 2:10 PM, karl wrote:

> Yep.  The state of Louisiana and the city of New Orleans have a lot to
> answer for.
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Michael D. Findlay" <mdfindlay@...>
> To: "'DADL (off topic)'" <dadl-ot@...>
> Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2007 10:43 AM
> Subject: [DADL-OT] Lance is right
>
>
>> I apologize for ever doubting you.  I'd forgotten about this but it  
>> is
>> quite
>> chilling.
>>
>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm5PC7z79-8
>>
>>
>> No virus found in this outgoing message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.5.503 / Virus Database: 269.16.7/1152 - Release Date:
>> 11/26/2007
>> 10:50 AM
>>
>>
>>
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Regards,
-Lance

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Michael D. Findlay | 2 Dec 22:02 2007
Picon
Picon

Re: Lance is right

Yep it was the national guard.  And the lack of public outcry is almost as
frightening as the military action itself.  

Mike F.   

-----Original Message-----
From: dadl-ot-bounces@...
[mailto:dadl-ot-bounces@...] On
Behalf Of Lance McLain
Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2007 3:49 PM
To: DADL (off topic)
Subject: Re: [DADL-OT] Lance is right

Weren't those National Guard?  I agree that most of the blame lies with the
State and City, but I don't think you can leave the Feds out of this either.

regards,
-Lance

On Dec 2, 2007, at 2:10 PM, karl wrote:

> Yep.  The state of Louisiana and the city of New Orleans have a lot to 
> answer for.
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Michael D. Findlay" <mdfindlay@...>
> To: "'DADL (off topic)'" <dadl-ot@...>
> Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2007 10:43 AM
> Subject: [DADL-OT] Lance is right
>
>
>> I apologize for ever doubting you.  I'd forgotten about this but it 
>> is quite chilling.
>>
>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm5PC7z79-8
>>
>>
>> No virus found in this outgoing message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.5.503 / Virus Database: 269.16.7/1152 - Release Date:
>> 11/26/2007
>> 10:50 AM
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> dadl-ot mailing list
>> http://thehood.us/mailman/listinfo/dadl-ot_thehood.us
>> http://news.gmane.org/gmane.music.dadl.ot
>
>
> --
> dadl-ot mailing list
> http://thehood.us/mailman/listinfo/dadl-ot_thehood.us
> http://news.gmane.org/gmane.music.dadl.ot

Regards,
-Lance

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No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition. 
Version: 7.5.503 / Virus Database: 269.16.7/1152 - Release Date: 11/26/2007
10:50 AM

No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition. 
Version: 7.5.503 / Virus Database: 269.16.7/1152 - Release Date: 11/26/2007
10:50 AM

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