karl | 1 Sep 01:31 2004
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Bush Calls the Rush show

http://www.rushlimbaugh.com/home/daily/site_083104/content/eib_interview.guest.html

Rush's Interview with President George W. Bush

August 31, 2004

Listen to Rush Interview President Bush.audio

BEGIN TRANSCRIPT

 RUSH LIMBAUGH: Ladies and gentlemen, we have been saying President Bush 
will join us at 1:45 this afternoon, about 12 minutes from now, but he can't 
wait. He's so excited, he's here now. President George W. Bush, welcome to 
the program, sir. Nice to have you with us.

PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH: Thank you, Rush. It's an honor to talk to you.

RUSH: Where are you right now?

THE PRESIDENT: I am in Des Moines, Iowa.

RUSH: And you are going...?

THE PRESIDENT: I just came from Nashville, Tennessee. I'm on my way to a big 
rally with some of our farmers and then I'm going to go to Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, where I will be participating in the convention from afar. 
After all, the First Lady Bush will be addressing the nation, and I want to 
welcome her to the podium.

RUSH: Let's talk about the American Legion convention. I watched your speech 
(Continue reading)

Peter T. Chattaway | 1 Sep 02:38 2004
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Re: Re: there's something almost muppety about this penguin video clip

On Tue, 31 Aug 2004, James Ladan wrote:

> > Whoops!  Try this:
> > http://riverking.com/flip.gif
>
> hehe...

Alas, it's fake.  My brother tells me he's got an MPEG of the original
video file *without* the penguin that does the slapping.  I had actually
suspected something, given how *perfectly* stationary the penguin is ...

--- Peter T. Chattaway ---------------------------
peter@... ---
Nothing tells memories from ordinary moments; only afterwards do they
   claim remembrance, on account of their scars. -- Chris Marker, La Jetee

--

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karl | 1 Sep 02:55 2004
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Re: Re: there's something almost muppety about this penguin video clip


> On Tue, 31 Aug 2004, James Ladan wrote:
> 
>> > Whoops!  Try this:
>> > http://riverking.com/flip.gif
>>
>> hehe...
> 
> Alas, it's fake.  My brother tells me he's got an MPEG of the original
> video file *without* the penguin that does the slapping.  I had actually
> suspected something, given how *perfectly* stationary the penguin is ...

I didnt thinkit was real, but its still funny anyway.
--

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Bruce Geerdes | 1 Sep 03:24 2004

Re: Vietnam issue cuts both ways

On Aug 31, 2004, at 12:09 PM, karl wrote:

> I would have hoped for a better candidate pool and one that would 
> actually want to reform spending.
>
> We dont have it.

Ah, well maybe we should move to a parliamentary system which 
encourages third parties.  ;)

Bruce

--

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Bruce Geerdes | 1 Sep 03:46 2004

Social Security (was: Vietnam issue cuts both ways)

On Aug 31, 2004, at 10:28 AM, karl wrote:

>> Yes, we are.  SS has been running a surplus for I-don't-know-how-long  
>> (forever?).  Eventually, after enough boomers retire, it'll start  
>> running a deficit.  Where has the SS surplus gone?  To servicing our  
>> overall debt.
>
> Not quite.  I looked into this, and  you are quite right when you say  
> it has had a surplus.  Where it goes is not a matter of raiding, but  
> of law.
>
> http://www.seniorjournal.com/NEWS/SocialSecurity/SocSecReform/03-14 
> -02GOPView.htm

Thanks for looking this up.  I do think it supports what I said,  
though.  By running a deficit today we are hindering our ability to pay  
out SS benefits.

(Quote)

> Yes, deficits and surpluses do matter, a lot. They will affect our  
> ability to repay the money owed to the Social Security trust funds in  
> the future.
>
> Social Security benefits will exceed Social Security taxes in the year  
> 2016. That is the year Social Security has to start cashing in those  
> Treasury IOUs. If the rest of the government runs budget surpluses  
> between now and then, it will be easier to honor those IOUs. Repeated,  
> large, deficit spending would create a crushing total debt burden on  
> the federal budget and make it harder to repay those IOUs. Interest  
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Karl | 1 Sep 04:29 2004
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Re: Vietnam issue cuts both ways

>> I would have hoped for a better candidate pool and one that would 
>> actually want to reform spending.
>>
>> We dont have it.
> 
> Ah, well maybe we should move to a parliamentary system which 
> encourages third parties.  ;)

Getting a strange feeling of Deja Vu......
--

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Peter T. Chattaway | 1 Sep 06:05 2004
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Clock ticks down for French hostages, Iraq government in security talks

Apparently boycotting the "coalition of the willing" failed to impress
certain people.

- - -

http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/afp/20040830/wl_mideast_afp/iraq_040830110441

Mon Aug 30, 7:04 AM ET 

BAGHDAD (AFP) -- The clock was ticking down for two French hostages whose
Islamist abductors have served Paris with an ultimatum to lift a ban on
Muslim headscarves in schools, while Iraq's government continued efforts
to end the chaos prevailing in the country.

[ snip ]

The report in the Washington Post came as a 48-hour ultimatum served by
the kidnappers of two French journalists to Paris to rescind its headscarf
ban was fast running out.

The French government swung into crisis mode on Sunday, after the pan-Arab
Al-Jazeera news network aired pictures of Christian Chesnot and Georges
Malbrunot with a claim from the Islamic Army in Iraq.

But the French government spokesman Jean-Francois Cope said Paris would
not yield to the abductors' demands and assured that the law would come
into effect as planned at the start of the academic year on Thursday.

Italian newsman Enzo Baldoni was shot dead by the same group after Rome
refused its demand to pull its troops out of Iraq.
(Continue reading)

Peter T. Chattaway | 1 Sep 06:14 2004
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THE NEW AMERICA FIRSTERS

http://www.steynonline.com/index2.cfm?edit_id=24

This was written after the Democrat but before the Republican Convention,
but after that very moving speech by the Iraqi-American lady Zainab
al-Suwaij and Rudy Giuliani's brisk trot across the grim victories of
terrorism from the '72 Olympics on it seems even clearer which party is
engaged in the world:

-

When did the left get so hicksville and parochial? They were always the
most ostentatiously internationalist end of the spectrum, always asserting
"solidarity" with the oppressed masses overseas. True, this
internationalism derived mainly from their belief in big government, and
world government as the biggest government of all. But by definition it
obliged the left to embrace notions of common humanity, etc. Even their
line-up of unsavoury Latin pin-ups -- Fidel to Che, Allende to Ortega --
required them at least to have a nodding acquaintance with the foreign
pages of the newspaper.

Not any more. To be sure, John Kerry pledges that, under his leadership,
America "will rejoin the world community". But it remains to be seen how
many members of the world community will still be on speaking terms with
the party come November. The Democrats sneer about "nations you can buy on
e-bay" and berate the President for his obnoxiousness to foreigners all in
the same sentence. Bush has "alienated almost everyone," Jimmy Carter told
CNN, "and now we have just a handful of little tiny countries supposedly
helping us in Iraq."

"Little tiny countries"? Who do you have to be -- other than Jacques
(Continue reading)

Peter T. Chattaway | 1 Sep 06:26 2004
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Everything is sacred

http://www.canada.com/national/nationalpost/news/artslife/story.html?id=b9c2c143-cd06-4494-a22b-ac6dfe399b2a

In martial-arts films such as Hero, ritual finds its place again

Robert Fulford 
National Post 
August 31, 2004

Have martial-arts movies like Kill Bill and Hero arisen among us to
satisfy our ancient need for ritual? We methodically expel ceremony from
most of life, stripping church liturgy down to basics and draining the
esoteric meaning from royal and military rites. Egotism and TV have long
since eroded formal political tradition -- during Question Period,
Parliament looks like a yapping kindergarten class.

But in Zhang Yimou's Hero, ritual recaptures its old role as an essential
element in human society, at least for an hour and a half. Our secular
culture has been living through generations of (as they say in comparative
religion courses) "desacralization," turning public activity mundane,
formless and emotionally empty. The dean of religious anthropologists,
Mircea Eliade, gave in The Sacred and the Profane his opinion, since
frequently echoed, that "Desacralization pervades the entire experience of
the non-religious man of modern societies."

Not, however, the world imagined by directors such as Yimou, who made Hero
(his earlier films include Raise the Red Lantern and Red Sorghum). In
ancient China, he creates a stylized theatre of war where freelance
soldiers give sacred meaning to their every action -- even when, as in
this film, no formal religion is mentioned by name. These renegade killers
commit themselves first of all to refinement and style. For them,
(Continue reading)

Peter T. Chattaway | 1 Sep 06:34 2004
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The whole truth from Vincent Gallo

http://www.suntimes.com/output/eb-feature/sho-sunday-gallo29.html

August 29, 2004
BY ROGER EBERT, SUN-TIMES FILM CRITIC 

Vincent Gallo and I have a history. In May 2003, I called his "The Brown
Bunny" the worst film in the history of the Cannes Film Festival. Then he
put a hex on me to give me colon cancer. Now we're about to meet for the
first time.

It was a little tense in the Lake Street Screening Room, following the
screening recently of the re-edited, shorter version of "The Brown Bunny."
I heard Gallo was in the elevator. I heard he was in the hallway. I heard
he was around the corner. Then there he was. The atmosphere lightened
after he explained he had never wished colon cancer on me in the first
place. He was misquoted. He actually specified prostate cancer.

"You know how that happened?" he asked. "I have prostatitis. I go to this
guy doctor in California. He doesn't want to put me on antibiotics or
whatever. But I get these things called a prostate massage."

"Are you taking flaxseed?" I asked him.

"I know all my nutritional things," he said. "I had been battling this
prostatitis, and a reporter who I didn't know said 'I'm doing a story on
Cannes and I want to know if you read what Roger Ebert said about your
film.' I said, yeah, I read all about it. 'Well, do you have any comment?'

"And I said something like, 'Tell him I curse his prostate.' I said it in
a joking way. And then the reporter converted it into a curse on your
(Continue reading)


Gmane