Sun Zoom Spark | 1 Aug 11:01 2005
Picon
Picon

NEWS: Monthly Reminder (August 2005)

===================== ACCMAIL Monthly Reminder =======================

Posted 01 Aug 2005
This message is intended to inform you what to do before posting to
    accmail@...
the mailing list discussing "Accessing the Internet via Email".

 1. Purpose
 2. The ACCMAIL FAQ: a guide to offline internet access
 3. Usenet
 4. WWW-to-email server performance statistics
 5. Posting to ACCMAIL: language
 6. Posting to ACCMAIL: subject lines
 7. Posting to ACCMAIL: off-topic
 8. Posting to ACCMAIL: netiquette
 9. Receiving ACCMAIL: digest and single postings
10. ACCMAIL topics
11. ACCMAIL archives and search
12. Other mailing lists
13. Epilogue

======================================================================
1. PURPOSE

This list exists as a forum for communicating news, comments and
questions about email-only methods of accessing the Internet.

This is the place to find out about new versions, ask questions about
the current version, make suggestions for additions/deletions, etc.

(Continue reading)

Nicholas Staff | 2 Aug 15:29 2005
Picon
Picon

The relevancy of the internet over SMTP and it's role in the future...?

This is not a derogatory or judgmental post - it's a question and I'm hoping
the answer will open my eyes if there's something I don't understand.

I realize that only about 15% of the world has Internet access and that very
few of those people have a fiber local loop but even so, what benefits do
you see being realized from having the ability to access The Internet via
email considering the current and proposed infrastructures?  It just seems
to me like a solution for a very different internet and that in the coming
days there will seldom be a person who is email enabled that doesn't also
have essentially unrestricted and unlimited internet access as well.  Do you
disagree?  Is this functionality maintained for historic and novelty
purposes or do you see it still making a difference?  Thank you.

Nick Staff

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Kui Tang | 3 Aug 20:11 2005
Picon

Re: The relevancy of the internet over SMTP and it's role in the future...?

I disagree.  While it's obvious that in developing countries email
often is the only way to access the WWW, don't forget mobile
phones/devices.  There are very few WAP sites and I haven't heared of
www4sms anytime yet.  So email is a way to access non-WAP site on
phones.

On 02/08/05, Nicholas Staff <nick.staff@...> wrote:
> This is not a derogatory or judgmental post - it's a question and I'm hoping
> the answer will open my eyes if there's something I don't understand.
> 
> I realize that only about 15% of the world has Internet access and that very
> few of those people have a fiber local loop but even so, what benefits do
> you see being realized from having the ability to access The Internet via
> email considering the current and proposed infrastructures?  It just seems
> to me like a solution for a very different internet and that in the coming
> days there will seldom be a person who is email enabled that doesn't also
> have essentially unrestricted and unlimited internet access as well.  Do you
> disagree?  Is this functionality maintained for historic and novelty
> purposes or do you see it still making a difference?  Thank you.
> 
> Nick Staff
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> To contribute to the discussion, email to accmail@...
> To unsubscribe, email to the *admin* address listserv@...
> with UNSUBSCRIBE ACCMAIL as the message body.
> To get the latest version of the ACCMAIL FAQ, send a blank email to
> accmail.faq.en `AT` szs.net (replacing `AT` with  <at>  to form a proper
> email address).
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
(Continue reading)

Eugeny Sattler | 4 Aug 13:54 2005
Picon

Re: The relevancy of the internet over SMTP

Tyler Trezise wrote:
> many workplaces allow email access but not necessarily WWW access, so
> here it is useful.

> well it could be, if there were any good www to email servers still out
there.

You forgot to say the word "free"

actually there is a good choice of paid web2email servers
--

-- 

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Bassim | 5 Aug 08:00 2005
Picon

Re: The relevancy of the internet over SMTP and it's role in the future...?

Technically, you're  right, but there're another factors regarding
cost, time/ease, availability and issues related to site screening
"filtering" adopted by many countries.

As to the cost, in my place, Baghdad-Iraq, one hour costs me a little more
than $1 for a sluggish dial-up service, let alone the telephone fees.
It's too expensive in relation to our living standards. Obviously, emails takes
few minutes to send and receive particularly if you're using OE or similar
email client. *Gmail is very good on this*. 

Regarding time/ease, many people are subscribers to many newsletters.
In my case, I'm a subscriber to a dozen of technical, astronomy, political
commercial.....etc newsletters.
When reading a newsletter, the bulk of the information are in the form
of hot links embedded in the message body, you know, it's much easier
and time saving to copy/paste the link into a message you receive later
to read in time to your convenience than going on line, engaging your
tel. line for every link, particularly if you use hot keys.

More over you can archive some information of interest for you in case
you're using OE which is the way most of web2mail users adopt.

I know people who, virtually, totally depend on web2mail services for
retrieving news as they're live in a country FOND of site screening.

Until the rest, supposedly, 85% of the people get high speed, reliable,
conceivable internet access and without screening, we will continue
to be in need for the Web to Mail services.

Thanks and respect to all the nice people who're maintaining/keeping
(Continue reading)

Tyler Trezise | 4 Aug 13:39 2005

Re: The relevancy of the internet over SMTP

many workplaces allow email access but not necessarily WWW access, so
here it is useful.

well it could be, if there were any good www to email servers still out
there.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Eugeny Sattler | 5 Aug 09:55 2005
Picon

The relevancy of the internet over SMTP and it's role in the futu re...?

> It's too expensive in relation to our living standards. Obviously, emails
takes
> few minutes to send and receive particularly if you're using OE or similar
> email client. *Gmail is very good on this*. 
I constantly fail to understand why web-based email turns out , for some of
us, more lightweighted in terms of traffic compared to accessing mailbox via
a POP3 mailreader.

With browser you download interface elements, some scripts and some ads in
addition to email message itself, don't you?
--

-- 

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Lena from Kiev | 4 Aug 11:09 2005
Picon

Re: The relevancy of the internet over SMTP and it's role in the future...?

> From:    Nicholas Staff <nick.staff@...>
> Subject: The relevancy of the internet over SMTP

Not only over SMTP. For 9 years my access was over dial-up UUCP.

> I realize that only about 15% of the world has Internet access and that very
> few of those people have a fiber local loop but even so, what benefits do
> you see being realized from having the ability to access The Internet via
> email considering the current and proposed infrastructures?

Comcast is an ISP in USA. Don't assume that everybody everywhere has
same income and same options as you have. For example, my phone is still
connected via ancient mechanical-coordinate (analog) phone station of the
state phone company. 14400 bit/s dial-up connection via it is not very stable
(often disconnects even during short UUCP sessions), faster - really unstable.
The UUCP user software automatically redials and resumes transmission from
the breakpoint, not from the beginning - big advantage in comparison with
POP3/SMTP over PPP. Average monetary income here is about US $40/month (sic),
it's for all - food, rent, clothes, medicines, taxes etc., far not only
for Internet access. Computers are as expensive as in USA.
Imagine living on $40/month.  Then you'll take numbers below more seriously.
Besides monthly flat fee, the state phone company requires also pay by second
of talks and dial-up sessions $0.43/hour (soon the rate will double),
it's in addition to ISP fee. Cheapest night (8PM-8AM) +weekends call-back
(ISP calls the user in order for user to avoid paying to the phone company
by minute for all time of dial-up sessions) is $22/month, works with far not
every phone station (I didn't try mine). Private phone companies are far more
expensive. I paid flat fee $3.28/month to my previous ISP for unlimited UUCP
(dial-up email-only) access, plus to the phone company by second for
dial-up sessions time (minimal possible thanks UUCP advantages).
(Continue reading)

Bassim | 7 Aug 00:58 2005
Picon

The relevancy of the internet over SMTP and it's role in the futu re...?

Eugeny Sattler, wrote,

<<I constantly fail to understand why web-based email turns out , for some of
us, more lightweighted in terms of traffic compared to accessing mailbox via
a POP3 mailreader

With browser you download interface elements, some scripts and some ads in
addition to email message itself, don't you?>>
*****************************

I'll talk away from technical terms or desk calculations.

I have a dial-up telephone connection and to clear any doubts
about my hardware, it is briefly,
 a Celeron 2.4Ghz, 521Mb ram.
Motherboard Asus P4P800S SE, Creative Modem Blaster V.90.
and a well maintained OS, WinXP pro. SP2.
My connection speed reaches ~50 Kb/s.

In best cases, to open my email box on Yahoo, including the
filling-up of ID and password, takes about 3 minutes, reading
emails would take any time, you know, depending on many
factors. 

With Gmail it takes about half the time to reach my box
while it's the same like Yahoo inside the box.

Keep in mind this is only to read, composing takes a hell
of time, with attachment it's a misery specially on Yahoo.

(Continue reading)

Todd Wuerdeman | 6 Aug 22:22 2005

Re: The relevancy of the internet over SMTP and it's role in the future...?

Nick,
     I personally know individuals who has internet access but are in
Mainland China.  E-mail has been essentially unrestricted, but most outside
IPs are restricted or censored.  Some sites like the BBC news site and other
US websites are blocked.

     On the other side, I am a freight conductor on the railroad.  For me,
accessing web pages via e-mail is the most expedient way to obtain the
information I want.  This makes my requests easier and a no-hassle solution.
When I am taking a train from Cincinnati to Toledo (or vice-versa), I am
able to submit my requests and they wait until either I reach my final
destination, or if I pass an open router along the mainline my email
application sends my requests.   When I reach my final destination (or some
intermediate point with a router) I have my replies and my data.

     There are two reasons for using this service and several other reason
which I will not bore you with.

Any questions?  Have a good day!

/R,

Todd

 
-----Original Message-----
From: Nicholas Staff 
Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 09:30
Subject: The relevancy of the internet over SMTP and it's role in the
future...?
(Continue reading)


Gmane