Yuandan Zhang | 1 Jun 01:12 2005
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Re: case sensitive in mounted USB disk

Rick Stevens wrote:

>
>>>
>> It is FAT32, here is output from fdisk -l
>>
>>
>> Disk /dev/sda: 1463 MB, 1463648256 bytes
>> 64 heads, 63 sectors/track, 709 cylinders
>> Units = cylinders of 4032 * 512 = 2064384 bytes
>>
>>   Device Boot    Start       End    Blocks   Id  System
>> /dev/sda1             1       709   1429312+   b  Win95 FAT32
>
>
> Any FAT or NTFS (in fact, all DOS filesystems) are case insensitive.
> Not a bug, that's the definition of the filesystems.

Yes, I understand Fat is case insensitive. As Matthew suggested, I want 
the upper case file names showing in uppper case.

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Dave Jones | 1 Jun 01:16 2005
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Re: memory.c - bad pmd - x86_64

On Tue, May 31, 2005 at 10:30:43PM +0200, Christoph Franke wrote:
 > Dave Jones - Tue, May 24 2005 12:57:15 -0400:
 > 
 > > On Tue, May 24, 2005 at 07:02:40AM -0700, Peter J. Stieber wrote:
 > >  > DJ = Dave Jones
 > >  > DJ> Hrmph. No, I screwed up the patch.
 > >  > DJ> -29 is rebuilding, it'll appear in the FC3/ subdir of my
 > >  > DJ> people page a little while after its done building.
 > >  > 
 > >  > here's what I get with 2.6.11-1.29_FC3smp.
 > >  > 
 > >  > May 24 06:55:43 maggie kernel: collect2:5519 free pmd ffff8100777f1000 
 > >  > freed by 0xffffffffffffffff
 > >  > May 24 06:55:43 maggie kernel: mm/memory.c:109: bad pmd 
 > >  > ffff8100777f1000(0000000000000064).
 > 
 > [snip]
 > 
 > I noticed a -30 build on your webspace at people.redhat.com. Is this
 > based on 2.6.11.11, and does it nail the bad pmd bug?

No idea yet, you tell me :)

		Dave

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Rick Stevens | 1 Jun 01:26 2005

Re: case sensitive in mounted USB disk

Yuandan Zhang wrote:
> Rick Stevens wrote:
> 
>>
>>>>
>>> It is FAT32, here is output from fdisk -l
>>>
>>>
>>> Disk /dev/sda: 1463 MB, 1463648256 bytes
>>> 64 heads, 63 sectors/track, 709 cylinders
>>> Units = cylinders of 4032 * 512 = 2064384 bytes
>>>
>>>   Device Boot    Start       End    Blocks   Id  System
>>> /dev/sda1             1       709   1429312+   b  Win95 FAT32
>>
>>
>>
>> Any FAT or NTFS (in fact, all DOS filesystems) are case insensitive.
>> Not a bug, that's the definition of the filesystems.
> 
> 
> Yes, I understand Fat is case insensitive. As Matthew suggested, I want 
> the upper case file names showing in uppper case.

The FAT translation is all lower case.  Sorry.  There are three levels
of "pickyness" as to equivalency, but uppercase characters are displayed
in lower case AFAIK.  See the "Mount options for fat" in the mount(8)
manpage.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
- Rick Stevens, Senior Systems Engineer     rstevens <at> vitalstream.com -
(Continue reading)

John Mahowald | 1 Jun 01:46 2005
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Re: web multimedia procols.

On 5/31/05, Robin Laing <Robin.Laing <at> drdc-rddc.gc.ca> wrote:
> 
> The link was similar to this.
> 
>    mss://www.someserver.com/multimedia/thisfile.wmv
> 

Try opening the link in a video player like totem.

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John Summerfied | 1 Jun 01:46 2005

Re: Creating a cluster

Mathias Gibbens wrote:
> Hi all,
> 
>   Is there a way to create a cluster so that you can spread one 
> process across many computers, thus creating something like one 
> super processor, and not many single processors? Thanks,

Take a look at openmosix. From the little you said, I think it's better 
than the other suggestions.

> 

-- 

Cheers
John

-- spambait
1aaaaaaa <at> computerdatasafe.com.au  Z1aaaaaaa <at> computerdatasafe.com.au
Tourist pics http://portgeographe.environmentaldisasters.cds.merseine.nu/

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Claude Jones | 1 Jun 01:55 2005

Re: web multimedia procols.

On Tuesday 31 May 2005 7:46 pm, John Mahowald wrote:
> On 5/31/05, Robin Laing <Robin.Laing <at> drdc-rddc.gc.ca> wrote:
> > The link was similar to this.
> >
> >    mss://www.someserver.com/multimedia/thisfile.wmv
>
> Try opening the link in a video player like totem.

That's not going to work unless she installs the Windows Media codecs. Try the 
mplayer site for more info on how to get that working
-- 
Claude Jones
Bluemont, VA, USA

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Ashley M. Kirchner | 1 Jun 02:01 2005

Building redundancy


    First, the question: How to build redundancy on a "users" server?

    What's behind it: When our main users server goes down, no one can 
log in to check their e-mail.  So the problem as it was presented this 
morning was to research some way to make it so that if that server goes 
down, users still have a way of getting to their e-mail or login to 
their accounts for that matter.  Now, the setup we have is a bit 
different from most people I'm sure.  Incoming e-mail flows as follows:

    Internet -> MX server -> spool server (NIS+ slave)

    Our "users" server - also our NIS+ master - (which is a totally 
different machine) does an NFS mount of the spool server on /var/mail/ 
and voila, e-mail.  When our users use imap/pop to check/get/send 
e-mail, they log in to that "users" server to do so.  No one 
communicates directly with the spool server.  So when the "users" server 
goes down, no one can get to their e-mail.  The question: what kind of 
redundancy can I build so that if that server were to go down, that 
users can still log in (to -something-) and still access everything they 
need.  Presumably this would be a separate machine and that the fall 
back would be transparent to them.  I just don't know how or what.

--

-- 
H | I haven't lost my mind; it's backed up on tape somewhere.
  +--------------------------------------------------------------------
  Ashley M. Kirchner <mailto:ashley <at> pcraft.com>   .   303.442.6410 x130
  IT Director / SysAdmin / WebSmith             .     800.441.3873 x130
  Photo Craft Imaging                       .     3550 Arapahoe Ave. #6
  http://www.pcraft.com ..... .  .    .       Boulder, CO 80303, U.S.A. 
(Continue reading)

R. Kesler | 1 Jun 02:06 2005
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Question about dual-booting/VMware

I'm a new Linux user and just downloaded Fedora Core
3.  I was planning on running a dual-boot
configuration with WinXP Home Edition.  My computer
has a C: partition (72GB) and a D: partition (4.66GB).
 It is a Compaq and the D: partition is used as a
system recovery partition.  I am more than experienced
in a Microsoft environment and was wondering if my
current configuration would cause any problems when I
begin to install Fedora.  

What I really want to know is if I should create a
10GB partition in DOS then install Fedora and direct
the installer to use the 10GB partition or should I
let the Fedora installer create my partitions?  I know
I will need a /root partition and a Linux swap
partition.  Any help would be appreciated as I am new
to Linux.

Also, anyone used Fedora with VMware?  I see that Red
Hat 7.0-9.0 is compatible with VMware, as well as 
RHEL AS/ES/WS 4.0 (32-bit), RHEL AS/ES/WS 2.1, 3.0,
and 
RHEL Advanced Server 2.1.  

Any and all feedback would be greatly appreciated. 
Thanks.

Richard

__________________________________________________
(Continue reading)

Ow Mun Heng | 1 Jun 02:09 2005
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MyOSS Magazine - Edition 2 Available Now

Hi All,

Just wanted to announce that MyOSS Magazine - Edition 2 (Oh My Gosh!
It's Edition 2) is now officially hitting the street. This is a 
community driven project which aims to publish monthly.
(Sorry if this is considered as spam). 

Open Source Power Management
Power management is sort of like the holy grail when it comes to laptops
and one main reason why power management in *NIX needs work is due to
the large variety of laptops in the market. Each with their own unique
implementation of ACPI and etc. As such, ACPI will be different in
different laptops and that's where the headache begins. Well, ever
wanted things to "Just Work" when it comes to power management under
*NIX? Well, look no more because we show you the steps needed to get
power management to "Just Work".

Open Source PBX/PABX
If you didn't already know about the newest kid on the block, Asterisk,
I suggest you take time out to read about this wonderful new software
based PBX/PABX which rivals even the best of hardware PBX/PABX out there
in the market. With loads of features to match, and a very affordable
price to match. What more do you want? (More? Well, request it and your
wish may come true!)

Daemon's Advocate
We take you through a tour of FreeBSD and provide you with the facts why
you should consider FreeBSD as a FOSS(Free and Open Source Software)
development platform.

(Continue reading)

Oliver Leitner | 1 Jun 02:15 2005
Picon

Re: Building redundancy

On 6/1/05, Ashley M. Kirchner <ashley <at> pcraft.com> wrote:
> 
>     First, the question: How to build redundancy on a "users" server?
> 
>     What's behind it: When our main users server goes down, no one can
> log in to check their e-mail.  So the problem as it was presented this
> morning was to research some way to make it so that if that server goes
> down, users still have a way of getting to their e-mail or login to
> their accounts for that matter.  Now, the setup we have is a bit
> different from most people I'm sure.  Incoming e-mail flows as follows:
> 
>     Internet -> MX server -> spool server (NIS+ slave)
> 
>     Our "users" server - also our NIS+ master - (which is a totally
> different machine) does an NFS mount of the spool server on /var/mail/
> and voila, e-mail.  When our users use imap/pop to check/get/send
> e-mail, they log in to that "users" server to do so.  No one
> communicates directly with the spool server.  So when the "users" server
> goes down, no one can get to their e-mail.  The question: what kind of
> redundancy can I build so that if that server were to go down, that
> users can still log in (to -something-) and still access everything they
> need.  Presumably this would be a separate machine and that the fall
> back would be transparent to them.  I just don't know how or what.
>

besides the obvious (keeping the server running) id consider you think
about a mirroring type of system, i am not sure if anyone has yet
tried something like that for mailservers, at least for webservers its
pretty common to have 2 or 3 or more servers, who are updating their
content with each other at special given times.
(Continue reading)


Gmane