Elias Athanasopoulos | 7 Apr 17:57 2002
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Re: a little help for newbie in C

On Sat, Apr 06, 2002 at 11:38:28AM -0500, ramzez wrote:

>   I'm newbie in C and I want to write a string and later read a char... but i
> don't want to see this char (I mean don't echo only for this)...
> <.../...>
>   printf("Hi, i am a string\n")
>   key=getchar();  //but I don't want to see the character pressed
> <.../...>

There are a lot of ways to do this. Some of them are more or less porta-
ble. 

One way is to use the ncurses lib. It contains a lot of functions for
text mode applications (text windows, keyboard handling, etc.). Read
the ncurses docs to see examples.

One other is to use low-level terminal handling. I did this before
3-4 years. Below, you can have a look at my code. It's quite old so
double-check it.

Elias

#include <stddef.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <termios.h>

struct termios saved_attrib;

(Continue reading)

Jerry T | 8 Apr 02:49 2002
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Fwd: Re: cdrom working! (almost)

How do I access the cdrom ioctls?

>From: Adam Schrotenboer <adam <at> tabris.net>
>To: "Jerry T" <linuxl1 <at> hotmail.com>, linux-newbie <at> vger.kernel.org
>Subject: Re: cdrom working! (almost)
>Date: Sat, 6 Apr 2002 23:44:59 -0500
>
>On Saturday 06 April 2002 16:28, Jerry T wrote:
> > I turned on the scsi-cdrom-support in "make xconfig", recompiled and
> > my cd started working. I can read data files on the cd but I cannot
> > listen to audio cds. Sndconfig seems to work fine and I can play audio
> > files off my harddrive. When I run the cd-player (gtcd) I can see the
> > title of the CD but when I click 'play' it does nothing. I also tried
> > whatever the KDE CD player is and it just hangs up.
> >
> > If I try to mount the audio cdrom I now get the following error
> > "mount:wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/cdrom, or too
> > many mounted file systems"
>Red Book Audio is a) not mountable and b) not needed to be. All
>functions are performed via cdrom ioctls.
> >
> > I see iso9660 listed in /proc/filesystems.
> >
> > _________________________________________________________________
> > Join the worldÂ’s largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail.
> > http://www.hotmail.com
> >
> > -
> > To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe
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Adam Schrotenboer | 8 Apr 05:05 2002
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Re: Fwd: Re: cdrom working! (almost)

On Sunday 07 April 2002 20:49, Jerry T wrote:
> How do I access the cdrom ioctls?

That's cdp and xmms and various programs are for.

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G Anna | 8 Apr 15:57 2002
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a simple browser

Dear All,

Can anybody suggest a good and simple browser?  Netscape core dumps
very often, Mozilla is very very slow and I do not know of any other
browser.  (Most of the websites nowadays doesn't care about Lynx :-(

Thanks for your time.

anna

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Ola Theander | 8 Apr 16:39 2002
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The best way to remote administer a Linux server?

Dear subscribers.

I'm planning to host a server running Linux at a remote location, where I
will need to administer it remotely. The problem is that it will be a bit of
hassle to access the server physically, therefore I must find a solution
where I can minimize the need of physical access to the server.

The server will host web pages, run a PostgreSQL database, Q-Mail and some
other stuff. I would like to be able to manage most (all) administrative
tasks remotely, like starting a backup, adding/modifying web pages and
performing database maintenance. All this must be in a secure way to prevent
unauthorized administration.

My question is, what's the best way to configure this king of remote
administration? Is it using SSH or should I look at something like remote
desktop software such as VNC?

Kind regards, Ola Theander
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1stFlight | 8 Apr 17:26 2002
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Picon

Re: The best way to remote administer a Linux server?

How about the best of both worlds? Take a look at this
http://www.uk.research.att.com/vnc/sshvnc.html  it describes how to run  VNC
over SSH, albeit not the fastest way of doing things, it does provide security
and maintain the use of a familiar GUI environment with a variety of clients.

Darryl

Ola Theander wrote:

> Dear subscribers.
>
> I'm planning to host a server running Linux at a remote location, where I
> will need to administer it remotely. The problem is that it will be a bit of
> hassle to access the server physically, therefore I must find a solution
> where I can minimize the need of physical access to the server.
>
> The server will host web pages, run a PostgreSQL database, Q-Mail and some
> other stuff. I would like to be able to manage most (all) administrative
> tasks remotely, like starting a backup, adding/modifying web pages and
> performing database maintenance. All this must be in a secure way to prevent
> unauthorized administration.
>
> My question is, what's the best way to configure this king of remote
> administration? Is it using SSH or should I look at something like remote
> desktop software such as VNC?
>
> Kind regards, Ola Theander
> -
> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-newbie" in
> the body of a message to majordomo <at> vger.kernel.org
(Continue reading)

Elias Athanasopoulos | 8 Apr 18:30 2002
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Re: a simple browser

On Mon, Apr 08, 2002 at 07:27:28PM +0530, G Anna wrote:

> Can anybody suggest a good and simple browser?  Netscape core dumps
> very often, Mozilla is very very slow and I do not know of any other
> browser.  (Most of the websites nowadays doesn't care about Lynx :-(

Lately, I use Galeon. It utilizes the Mozilla engine, but it is quite 
more lighter than Mozilla itself (my machine is a K6/266Mhz/96MB). 

I had a good experience, as far as the performance is concerned, with
Opera, in the past. I stopped using it, due to the bad support for 
the Greek language (I live in Greece).

Opera is the fastest Web browser I have ever used in my machine.

Elias 

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Pierre Rousselet | 8 Apr 18:32 2002
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Re: a simple browser

G Anna wrote:
> Dear All,
> 
> Can anybody suggest a good and simple browser?  Netscape core dumps
> very often, Mozilla is very very slow and I do not know of any other
> browser.

mozilla and netscape-6.x are the same. I've tried recently konqueror 
(with kde-3.0), galeon, opera and keep using mozilla as a browser and 
mail tool. The 0.9.9 version of mozilla is quite stable on my box (PIII 
650).

Pierre
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Christoph | 8 Apr 21:29 2002
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Install location(s)

Apologies if this is a stupid question.  And apologies for all
the stupid questions that are sure to come from me in the
weeks to follow. :p  I take heart that since this is a newbie
list, I'm sure that you guys have fielded plenty.

In any case, my question:  where should you typically install
new software?  For example, I'm getting ready to look into
and install Samba on my Linux (RH 7.2) box.  I've DL'd it
already and have been reading the documentation but have
yet to make and install it.  So, where should it (and anything
else I plan to install) go to make it easier to manage and
administer?

thnx,
Christoph

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Ray Olszewski | 8 Apr 22:10 2002

Re: Install location(s)

<sigh> Not only is this not a stuipd question ... it isn't really even a
very asy one to answer. I'll take a broad-brush shot at it.

Generally speaking, good Linux/Unix practice is for the OS packager to put
core apps in /bin and /sbin, and less core ones in /usr/bin and /usr/sbin
(with bin versus sbin separating packages normally used by ordinary users
and normally user by the superuser). Similar good practice for apps added by
the sysadmin is to put them in /usr/local/bin and /use/local/sbin .

What makes it messy is that the distinction between apps added by the OS and
ones added by the sysadmin is at best fuzzy. When I install Samba on a
Debian host, I use the Debian packages for Samba, and they install them
wherever they think appropriate (probably in /usr/bin, but I didn't actually
check). Similarly, I'm sure RH has a set of rpm packages that will install
Samba for you.

In practice, the real distinction these days is probably between apps
managed by the distro's package manager (rpm for Red Hat and a lot of
others; dpkg and apt for Debian; I'm not sure what others are still around)
and apps installed outside that package manager. I'd put the latter ones in
/usr/local/bin and /use/local/sbin .

Theer are other things that can make this messy. A different set of Unix
conventions (ones not usually used in Linux) call for putting
locally-installed packages in /opt . And Debian (and perhaps others) use
/etc/alternatives as a place to manage symlinks for some apps (for example,
which of the many real editors gets run as "vi" on any specific system).

In practice, I'd suggest you deal with your immediate problem -- installing
Samba -- by installing the appropriate RPM binaries.
(Continue reading)


Gmane