Aleksandar Kuktin | 3 Apr 23:43 2012
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Linux Tycoon: a game where you build your own distro

Just dropped by Linux Game Database (http://www.lgdb.org/) and..
well, they added a new game to the database.

Copy-paste:
Linux Tycoon is the premier Linux Distro Building Simulator game in the
universe.

So what exactly do you do in a Linux Distro Building game?

So glad you asked! Here’s some examples of the thrilling challenges
you’ll find in Linux Tycoon:

Analyzing and selecting software packages.
Fixing Bugs.
Managing volunteers and paid staff.
Keeping the total size (in MB) of your Distro at a reasonable level.
And so much more!

Seriously though. It is fun. (It is a game, after all. You don’t
actually fix bugs yourself.)

LMAO. I just have to post a link to it here. :)
http://lunduke.com/?page_id=2646

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Steve T | 4 Apr 00:38 2012
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Re: Linux Tycoon: a game where you build your own distro

On 03/04/2012 22:43, Aleksandar Kuktin wrote:
> Just dropped by Linux Game Database (http://www.lgdb.org/) and..
> well, they added a new game to the database.
>
> Copy-paste:
> Linux Tycoon is the premier Linux Distro Building Simulator game in the
> universe.
>
> So what exactly do you do in a Linux Distro Building game?
>
> So glad you asked! Here’s some examples of the thrilling challenges
> you’ll find in Linux Tycoon:
>
> Analyzing and selecting software packages.
> Fixing Bugs.
> Managing volunteers and paid staff.
> Keeping the total size (in MB) of your Distro at a reasonable level.
> And so much more!
>
> Seriously though. It is fun. (It is a game, after all. You don’t
> actually fix bugs yourself.)
>
>
>
> LMAO. I just have to post a link to it here. :)
> http://lunduke.com/?page_id=2646
>
Sounds like it could be a good learning tool, if everything in there is 
totally accurate.

(Continue reading)

Serge Hooge | 4 Apr 10:27 2012
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Re: Linux Tycoon: a game where you build your own distro

> LMAO. I just have to post a link to it here. :)
> http://lunduke.com/?page_id=2646

I don't seem to find the source for it. I assume the game's non-free?
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Aleksandar Kuktin | 4 Apr 14:47 2012
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Re: Linux Tycoon: a game where you build your own distro

>On Wed, 4 Apr 2012 14:27:28 +0600
>Serge Hooge <cuznez <at> gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > LMAO. I just have to post a link to it here. :)
> > http://lunduke.com/?page_id=2646
> 
> I don't seem to find the source for it. I assume the game's non-free?

Ah, but there is no DRM on it! :)

Yes, it appears the game is neither free (speech) nor free (beer).

I just found it amusing that someone would first make and then play (!)
a game where you make you own distribution when you could just make your
own distribution. And have a working Linux distribution at the end of
it, not a high score.

The fact that the game costs $4 and does not have the source available
literally made me laugh.

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Yasar Arabaci | 4 Apr 20:33 2012
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Re: Linux Tycoon: a game where you build your own distro

Instead of creating a linux distro for free, we can now pretend to do it,
and it's only for $4. Sounds like a good deal to me!

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epersistente | 10 Apr 18:33 2012
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Has someone tried LSF on WesternDigital myBookLive?

Hi,

I got as a gift a WD 2Tb myBookLive blue light and I wonder in any of
you have tried to build LFS on this little NAS drive.

If so could you please talk a little bit about your experience?

The myBookLive disk is a PowerPC Debian Network Attached Storage drive.

Thanks in advance
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epersistente | 11 Apr 03:56 2012
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experience with PowerPC

Hi,
Someone has been able to build LFS in a PowerPC machine? (Applied
Micro APM82181)

Thanks
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jon | 16 Apr 16:47 2012

jhalfs and nALFS

would some mind telling the true story of the /downfall/ of nALFS?

Clearly a lot of love time and attention went into it and now its just
lying there.

Personally jhalfs feels completely wrong. I love when it works and there
it is a fully built system but it so happens that last time I could
only confidently do this with LFS-6.3 which left me doing all sorts of
weird things to keep this hybrid 'code-frankenstein's monster' on the
road.

On the other had I hate trying to work the ncurses style menu and
watching it crack over various little things during a build.

Please, any insight is appreciated, Im old washed up programmer and I
have begun looking at the code base for nALFS. Let me know how I
should/could proceed. If at all.

This last experiece with LFS and the lack of real feedback (nb that is
not a flame) had me looking at BSD! BTW is T2 working for anyone here?

Regards
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Jeremy Huntwork | 16 Apr 17:02 2012

Re: jhalfs and nALFS

On 4/16/12 10:47 AM, jon wrote:
> would some mind telling the true story of the /downfall/ of nALFS?
>
> Clearly a lot of love time and attention went into it and now its just
> lying there.
>
> Personally jhalfs feels completely wrong. I love when it works and there
> it is a fully built system but it so happens that last time I could
> only confidently do this with LFS-6.3 which left me doing all sorts of
> weird things to keep this hybrid 'code-frankenstein's monster' on the
> road.

There were two main reason nALFS was abandoned and jhalfs was implemented.

First, nALFS required maintaining a separate set of XML configs to feed 
into it as build recipes. We wanted something that could extract 
commands directly from the book and use those to build, so there was 
less chance of human error and (hopefully) a greater chance of achieving 
a pristine 'by-the-book' build.

Secondly, at the time, there weren't a lot of experienced developers 
contributing to the project, so it was felt that writing "simpler" 
scripts in shell to do all the heavy lifting would encourage more people 
to help contribute and maintain. This appears to have worked, for a time.

Unfortunately, over time jhalfs has also become a little heavy and 
unwieldy. It would be nice to take some of jhalfs' core concepts and 
refactor them into a more elegant solution.

JH
(Continue reading)

jon | 19 Apr 17:55 2012

Re: jhalfs and nALFS

On Mon, 16 Apr 2012 11:02:35 -0400
Jeremy Huntwork <jhuntwork <at> lightcubesolutions.com> wrote:

> On 4/16/12 10:47 AM, jon wrote:
> > would some mind telling the true story of the /downfall/ of nALFS?
> >
> > Clearly a lot of love time and attention went into it and now its
> > just lying there.
> >
> > Personally jhalfs feels completely wrong. I love when it works and
> > there it is a fully built system but it so happens that last time I
> > could only confidently do this with LFS-6.3 which left me doing all
> > sorts of weird things to keep this hybrid 'code-frankenstein's
> > monster' on the road.
> 
> There were two main reason nALFS was abandoned and jhalfs was
> implemented.
> 
> First, nALFS required maintaining a separate set of XML configs to
> feed into it as build recipes. We wanted something that could extract 
> commands directly from the book and use those to build, so there was 
> less chance of human error and (hopefully) a greater chance of
> achieving a pristine 'by-the-book' build.
> 
> Secondly, at the time, there weren't a lot of experienced developers 
> contributing to the project, so it was felt that writing "simpler" 
> scripts in shell to do all the heavy lifting would encourage more
> people to help contribute and maintain. This appears to have worked,
> for a time.
> 
(Continue reading)


Gmane