Robert Connolly | 17 Mar 05:00 2009
HAPPY SAINT PATRICK'S DAY!

Everyone is invited to your local Irish day parade, this Sunday. Ireland is 
preferable. Otherwise New York has the largest, and Montreal has the next 
largest parade (250th year this year). It looks like it will be warmer this 
year. I will be the lunatic with a 6 by 12 foot flag on a 16 foot pole, in 
Montreal.

Tip:
Get a bunch of miniature Irish flags, stick them in your hat and pockets, and 
blue eyed strawberry blond females will trade you kisses for them.

Robert
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Robert Connolly | 23 Mar 01:51 2009
I ended up having the biggest flag of the parade:
http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/~robert/st-patrick/2009/flag.jpg
When the military passed my flag, they saluted it.

robert
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Stef Bon | 26 Mar 20:23 2009
Picon

general question about running scripts.

Hello all,

I'm working with scripts which are started by ConsoleKit. Now this isn't 
a question about ConsoleKit, but about
starting a script and not waiting for it to return.

I've been working on a solution to make networkresources available via 
autofs on a dynamic way. After login with help
from ConsoleKit a mountpoint is added to the master file of the 
automounter. This mountpoint is in the homedirectory of the user logging 
in.

This way I've a browseable network map in my home directory for Windows 
Networks (via cifs), FTP (via curlftpfs/FUSE) and SSH (with sshfs/FUSE). 
Others, like Novell should be possible.

Now, the adding of the mountpoint to the auto.master file (and the 
reloading of the autofs daemon) is done by ConsoleKit, which runs 
scripts it finds in the some directories (/etc/ConsoleKit/run-session.d)
The problem here is that these script may not too long. This is 
problematic, because determinating the networkresources an user
has access to, can take some time, and can even take too much time, when 
there are networkproblems. So, I cannot let ConsoleKit wait for this 
script to finish. I've read some where that you can achieve this not 
waiting behaviour by adding an "&" after the shell script. An term for 
this is running asynchronous. Ok, but now what happens? ConsoleKit does 
not wait, which is what I wanted, but it looks like that my "add network 
mountpoint" script is running completely ascynchronous. It's calling 
other programs, and it looks like everything is running asynchronous, 
and it's making a mess of it.
(Continue reading)

Stef Bon | 30 Mar 13:48 2009
Picon

Re: general question about running scripts.

Stef Bon wrote:
> Now, the adding of the mountpoint to the auto.master file (and the 
> reloading of the autofs daemon) is done by ConsoleKit, which runs 
> scripts it finds in the some directories (/etc/ConsoleKit/run-session.d)
> The problem here is that these script may not too long. This is 
> problematic, because determinating the networkresources an user
> has access to, can take some time, and can even take too much time, when 
> there are networkproblems. So, I cannot let ConsoleKit wait for this 
> script to finish. I've read some where that you can achieve this not 
> waiting behaviour by adding an "&" after the shell script. An term for 
> this is running asynchronous. Ok, but now what happens? ConsoleKit does 
> not wait, which is what I wanted, but it looks like that my "add network 
> mountpoint" script is running completely ascynchronous. It's calling 
> other programs, and it looks like everything is running asynchronous, 
> and it's making a mess of it.
>
> Does anybody know what's happening here and how I can prevent this?
> I hope you as reader can understand the problem.
>   

Well,

I've solved this. When logging into KDE, there are tow seats added (one 
for the user, the other for the kwrited program)

This means that ConsoleKit runs the scripts it finds in the 
/etc/ConsoleKit/run-session.d twice, almost the same time.
My script was not capable of handling this. Now I'm using a lockfile to 
prevent running a scripts twice at the same time.

(Continue reading)


Gmane