cjns1989 | 1 Jul 01:41 2010
Picon

Re: Re: Misleading Debian's installer choice

Maybe he means "put" the usual "contents" of /var (cache, spool, log..) in a given partition? Hence, his
question re: more than one /var. If that is what he wants (needs?), there's nothing preventing him from
defining separate mount points and partitions for each sub-directory of /var at install time, I would
imagine? Although it would make more sense doing so with /home for instance - possibly on large multiuser
system, e.g.

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Alan Chandler" alan <at> chandlerfamily.org.uk
Date: Jun. 30 2010 06:43AM
Subject: Re: Misleading Debian's installer choice
  
On 30/06/10 09:29, Merciadri Luca wrote:

> I find this perfect, but it should be coupled with the impossibility of
> putting on two partitions the same stuff, i.e. putting /var on two
> partitions, for example.
>


You are still talking backwards

You put the partition (/dev/sdXY) on /var not the other way round.  You 
DON'T put /var on /dev/sdXY

If you imagine there is a conceptual drawing of the tree starting at / 
and including all the major mount points - with the non standard mount 
points being creatable manually, and somewhere below a list of 
unallocated partitions.

Then you could drag any partition (from the unallocated list or from 
(Continue reading)

Amrit Panesar | 1 Jul 02:20 2010

Re: SATA disk detected as IDE? SOLVED

On 6/30/2010 1:14 PM, Josep M. wrote:
> Hello Amrit.
>
> One option of the BIOS of the motherboard was allowing use with much
> less speed, I don't understand how much how run this, because install XP
> CD don't detect any SATA disk but Linux treat disk as IDE, and now seems
> that runs really much more fast, more than twice.
>
> Josep
>
>
> El mié, 30-06-2010 a las 12:00 -0700, Amrit Panesar escribió:
>    
>> On 6/30/2010 11:38 AM, Josep M. wrote:
>>      
>>> Hello.
>>>
>>> I have a SATA HD, installed as SATA HD (not as ide in motherboard) and
>>> Debian squeeze detects me this as IDE.
>>>
>>> What can I do for change his?
>>>
>>> Appended there is is the output of hdparm and sdparm
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>> Josep
>>>
>>>        
>
>    
(Continue reading)

Frank Miles | 1 Jul 02:17 2010

fglrx blacked iceweasel?

Yesterday's <squeeze> update included the non-free fglrx driver.  At least
I think that is what is causing iceweasel to erratically blacken/erase/wipe
many of the pages.

Are others experiencing this?  The browser has become almost completely unusable.
Or was there some other update affecting the browser?

 	-f

Rob Owens | 1 Jul 03:05 2010
Picon

Re: Debian Install stalls at 5% (at least for 3 hours, don't know if it suffices to designate this state as `stall')

On Tue, Jun 29, 2010 at 11:17:07PM +0200, Merciadri Luca wrote:
> Mark wrote:
> > On Tue, Jun 29, 2010 at 2:00 PM, Merciadri Luca
> > <Luca.Merciadri <at> student.ulg.ac.be
> > <mailto:Luca.Merciadri <at> student.ulg.ac.be>> wrote:
> >
> >     I tried a first Debian install, which stalled at 5%. I then
> >     re-tried, and
> >     here I am: stuck at 5% for a long time (~3 hours). I did not mess
> >     anything with the parameters, and this is not at all my first Debian
> >     install. I don't understand why this happens.
> >
> >
> > What stage is it on when it stalls, i.e. is it trying to download from
> > a certain server, partitioning, etc.?
> It is on `Please wait.' Normally, it should have already downloaded
> files (at least it wrote that it downloaded files some hours ago).
> > I only install off CD or DVD so I'm not familiar with the netinst.  I
> > will say the last time I had trouble like that, I chose a different
> > ftp mirror from outside my country and it worked.  You might have
> > already tried that though.
> I've already tried changing ftp mirrors, but nice suggestion though. I
> actually get many messages with in-target: `in-target: Do you wxant to
> ignore this warning and proceed anyway?' `To continue, enter [...].' and
> I see many packages' names with `in-target' before, but no warning. I
> can't go to the top, so I can't guess what it wrote before what I'm
> seeing. (I see all these messages thanks to Ctrl Alt F4 as suggested
> before.)
> 
Does Shift-PgUp allow you to see the messages at the top?  It took me 7
(Continue reading)

Stan Hoeppner | 1 Jul 03:36 2010

Re: [OT] Network Bizzard

Phillipus Gunawan put forth on 6/29/2010 7:41 PM:

> G1 -> G2, two Cat5e connected each other

Power everything off, PCs, switches, Netgear box, ALL OF IT.  Now, connect
one, and only one, cable between the TP-SG1016 switches.  More than one cable
between them breaks the rules, and your network.  Power the TP-SG1016s back
on, then the Netgear, then the PCs.  Let us know if that fixes the problem.

>  Switches model: TP-SG1016

As I thought, it's a super cheap unmanaged switch, less than $200 AU.
Probably low quality as well.

--

-- 
Stan

Jerome BENOIT | 1 Jul 03:12 2010
Picon

Re: Maple 14 and Squeeze (amd64)

Hello List,

On 30/06/10 21:56, Jordan Metzmeier wrote:
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA256
>
> On 06/30/2010 09:25 AM, Jerome BENOIT wrote:
>> Hello List,
>>
>> I am installing the last Maple version (Maple 14) on my Squeeze box
>> (amd64):
>> the command-in-line works fine, but I have trouble with the Java interface.
>> A small console pops up with the tile ``Kernel Connection Not Available''
>> and the message ``waiting for kernel connection''. On the xterm, I get
>> more details.
>>
>>   Exception in thread "kernel startup timeout check"
>> java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Attempt to change running kernel:
>> 0to starting state.
>>          at com.maplesoft.client.KernelProxy.setKernelStarting(Unknown
>> Source)
>>          at
>> com.maplesoft.client.KernelProxy.createKernelConnection(Unknown Source)
>>          at
>> com.maplesoft.worksheet.connection.WmiWorksheetKernelAdapter$StartupConnectionTimeout.run(Unknown
>> Source)
>>          at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:636)
>>
>> Note that the former Maple version (Maple 13.02) works well on my boxes.
>>
(Continue reading)

Anand Sivaram | 1 Jul 05:25 2010
Picon

Re: SATA disk detected as IDE? SOLVED



On Thu, Jul 1, 2010 at 05:50, Amrit Panesar <apanesar <at> 4195tech.com> wrote:
On 6/30/2010 1:14 PM, Josep M. wrote:
Hello Amrit.

One option of the BIOS of the motherboard was allowing use with much
less speed, I don't understand how much how run this, because install XP
CD don't detect any SATA disk but Linux treat disk as IDE, and now seems
that runs really much more fast, more than twice.

Josep


El mié, 30-06-2010 a las 12:00 -0700, Amrit Panesar escribió:
 
On 6/30/2010 11:38 AM, Josep M. wrote:
   
Hello.

I have a SATA HD, installed as SATA HD (not as ide in motherboard) and
Debian squeeze detects me this as IDE.

What can I do for change his?

Appended there is is the output of hdparm and sdparm

Thanks
Josep

     

 
No Problem Josep, anything to help a fellow Debian User.

Thanks



--
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> I have a SATA HD, installed as SATA HD (not as ide in motherboard) and
>Debian squeeze detects me this as IDE.

Why do you say that it is detected as IDE.  Normally IDE disks using deprecated IDE driver are shown as hda, hdb etc. where as SATA and the same IDE disks with newer PATA driver are shown as sda, sdb etc.  For you it is showing the disk as sda.  Take a look at "lspci -k" to see which kernel driver is getting used.
Also a very easy method to see the reading speed of the disk is

dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/null bs=1M count=1024
This will read the first 1024MB of your disk.  I think a good disk/controller gives you more than 70MB per second or so.

Stan Hoeppner | 1 Jul 05:45 2010

Re: caught flatfooted with a 2wire gateway model 4011G

Eduardo M KALINOWSKI put forth on 6/30/2010 11:37 AM:

> It could be a wireless router/access point. Does it have an antenna? If
> not, then I don't know what it means.

The 2Wire dsl/router/AP units have no visible classic antenna.  The antenna is
wholly contained inside the plastic box.  2Wire has built them this way since
2005, probably much longer.

>> 2. 2wire says that this gateway has a builtin pppoe client. So to
>> configure it I only run pppoeconf and specify the userid and the
>> password and then run pppd?
> 
> No. Since the device has a pppoe client, it can do authentication
> itself. You only plug your computer and it receives an IP via dhcp and
> connects to the internet. The computer is unaware how the connection is
> established, your device takes care of the details.

Correct.  He may have to plug into the wired ethernet port and hit the admin
page of the 2Wire and plug in the PPPoE uname and pwd.  After that his laptop
should pick up an IP from the wireless AP and that's it.

--

-- 
Stan

Stan Hoeppner | 1 Jul 06:37 2010

Re: SATA disk detected as IDE?

Josep M. put forth on 6/30/2010 2:11 PM:

> The performance of this HD is very poor,my old computer, SATA1, was much
> more fast than this SATA2 so, I'm looking how increase the performance
> of this computer.

This 1.5TB Seagate ST31500541AS drive spins at 5900 rpm.  Was your old drive a
7200 rpm model?  If so, that would explain the performance drop.  The old
drive will probably be faster across the board with random I/O.  The new drive
will likely stream sequential I/O a bit faster.  Given that the bulk of most
workstation/desktop I/O is random, the drive with the faster spindle speed
will have better performance, even if it is older.

For example, as a test, slap a used U320 SCSI card and a 5 year old 73GB
15,000 rpm Seagate or IBM U320 SCSI disk into your current workstation and
you'll see it run circles around _any_ brand new 750-2TB SATA drive.  It'll be
twice as fast or more with random I/O pretty much across the board, and will
still be competitive WRT streaming I/O.

When it comes to mechanical disk performance, there is no substitute for
spindle speed.

--

-- 
Stan

Stan Hoeppner | 1 Jul 07:13 2010

Re: SATA disk detected as IDE? SOLVED

Anand Sivaram put forth on 6/30/2010 10:25 PM:

> Why do you say that it is detected as IDE.  Normally IDE disks using

I don't get this either.  Nothing in anything he posted shows that the kernel
is detecting this drive as IDE.  Quite the contrary, it's being detected as a
SATA device, and if he'd have shown dmesg output, it would clearly state so,
but he did not.

> deprecated IDE driver are shown as hda, hdb etc. where as SATA and the same
> IDE disks with newer PATA driver are shown as sda, sdb etc.  For you it is
> showing the disk as sda.  Take a look at "lspci -k" to see which kernel
> driver is getting used.
> Also a very easy method to see the reading speed of the disk is

You're talking about libata, the current all-in-one SATA/PATA/ATAPI driver.
And yes, regardless of whether a drive is PATA or SATA, if it's under the
control of libata, it will show up as /dev/sdx, or if it's a CD/DVD-ROM as
/dev/srx.

> dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/null bs=1M count=1024
> This will read the first 1024MB of your disk.  I think a good
> disk/controller gives you more than 70MB per second or so.

That depends on many factors, the big one being whether the drive and
controller both support NCQ, and if they both have a good implementation of
it.  Look at the ATA_NCQ_HORKAGE list to see a group of drives whose
performance _drops_ considerably with NCQ enabled, or suffer other more
serious problems with NCQ enabled such as filesystem corruption, data loss, etc.

Other factors affecting sequential read performance (dd) are the elevator
used, and the nr_requests and read_ahead_kb settings.  Bumping read_ahead_kb
up from the default 128 to 512 or 1024 will produce a decent increase in
sequential read performance, about 10-20%.  For example, a quick test on one
of my lower end systems produces a 16% increase in sequential read performance:

/$ dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/null bs=1M count=1024
1024+0 records in
1024+0 records out
1073741824 bytes (1.1 GB) copied, 16.8026 s, 63.9 MB/s

/$ echo 1024 > read_ahead_kb
/$ dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/null bs=1M count=1024
1024+0 records in
1024+0 records out
1073741824 bytes (1.1 GB) copied, 14.4375 s, 74.4 MB/s

(This system only has only 384MB RAM so little to none of the performance
increase was due to buffers/cache from the first dd run)

_But_ a high read_ahead_kb setting causes a huge rise in the size of kernel
I/O buffers, eating system memory like candy.  This one test caused a 6 fold
increase in my kernel buffer size, to over 260MB.  Playing with read_ahead_kb
for testing can be useful in measuring absolute hardware performance, but I
wouldn't run day-to-day with a setting much higher than the default.  There
are some specific server applications where high read_ahead_kb is useful, such
as streaming media servers, but they are few and far between.

--

-- 
Stan


Gmane