Ron Johnson | 1 Jun 01:03 2006
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Re: Recommendations for Low Resource System


Hal Vaughan wrote:
> On Wednesday 31 May 2006 16:11, Steve Lamb wrote:
>> Hal Vaughan wrote:
>>> I understand someone has written up a config file (forgot what the
>>> special setting files are called) for screen writing formatting on
>>> emacs, but, as I said, when I'm writing, I'm in a different mode,
>>> and I just can't remember all the keystroke commands.  It's hard to
>>> explain, but I can use vi or other console editors and have no
>>> issue while programming, but once I switch gears and start writing
>>> fiction, my brain works completely differently.  It must be a left
>>> brain/right brain thing.
>>     Ok, maybe I'm way off base here but why not take a different
>> tact.  Why not come up with a text based shorthand you can use (kinda
>> like Wiki-style), throw something together in Python/Perl/Ruby to
>> parse it out and reformat for later importation into OOo?  That way
>> you can skip the GUI completely and also don't need to remember
>> keystrokes, only your formatting shorthand.
>>
>>     Of course, this is just really a pared down idea of what $EDITOR
>> + LaTeX would offer but it is what I would do as I do prefer text
>> editing of all types in vim, know Python/Perl and don't know LaTeX. 
>> :)
> 
> That's a good idea and I've been considering it.  The issue is one of 
> habit.  I haven't used Abiword in a while, but I know the main 
> controls, like CTRL-S for save, cut, copy, and paste, will all be the 
> same.  Ideally I want the keystrokes on the Amity to be as close to 
> possible as they are on the other system.
> 
(Continue reading)

Florian Kulzer | 1 Jun 01:08 2006
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Re: debian testing xorg fails on /dev/input/mice

On Wed, May 31, 2006 at 15:21:39 +0200, Jon Jahren wrote:
> Hi all
> I've just installed debian etch on my main computer, but I get an error
> when trying to start X, it tells me:
> (EE) xf86OpenSerial: Cannot open device /dev/input/mice
>             No such file or directory
> (EE) Configured Mouse: cannot open input device
> (EE) PreInit failed for input device "Configured Mouse"
>  No core pointer
> 
> And then goes on to give me a fatal error, and X doesn't start.
> 
> What package would provide this driver for me? I have
> xserver-xorg-input-mouse and I also found this link:
> http://lists.debian.org/debian-user/2005/12/msg00552.html
> But no solution. 
> Any help greatly appreciated, thanks

It looks more like a problem with the device itself. What kind of mouse
is it, serial (rather big, elongated connector), PS2 (round connector)
or USB (compact, flat connector)? Depending on that you might have
to load a kernel module to have the device created. (This should happen
automatically, but you never know...)

In any case, the first thing to check is if /dev/input/mice really
exists. "ls -l /dev/input" will tell you which devices are there. The
device might be called something like "/dev/input/mouse0", or it might
even be in the /dev directory directly as "/dev/psaux". You can test
likely candidates by reading their output directly. For example, to test
/dev/psaux you would run (as root):
(Continue reading)

Christopher Nelson | 1 Jun 02:14 2006

Re: Debina Installation ISO DVD Image Files

On Wed, May 31, 2006 at 11:37:48AM +0300, Robert J. A. Fernandes. wrote:
> Dear Sir,
> 
> I have downloaded DVD ISO Images files from this below location: -
> 
> http://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/3.1_r2/i386/iso-dvd/
> 
> in this section the file size its shows 4.4G for
> debian-31r2-i386-binary-1, but when I am downloading it give me 372MB
> and for the another file debian-31r2-i386-binary-2 it shows 4.1G but
> when I downloads it gives me 127MB.
> 
> So is this file ok or has to be correct 4 GB? I have doubt just because
> of this sizes.

You are correct in your doubts--it seems that the files did not download
completely.  Are you using a FAT partition (DOS or earlier Windows)?  I
don't think they can handle files that size.  Or maybe it's the program
you used to download the images.  At any rate--these .iso's are broken
and won't work right (at all, likely).  

> And is it according to above MB's then even I can burn on
> normal 700MB CD's right? So what's the meaning of DVD ISO Files? I
> didn't get?

You are also correct in that.  To use a DVD image, you need blank DVD
and a DVD burner (I don't think + or - matters).  If you just have
regular CD's try the CD images.  If you have a fast net connection, I
would grab the one labelled 'netinst' and do a network install.  Or the
'businesscard' one if you have a spiffy mini-CD ;)
(Continue reading)

Pascal Hakim | 1 Jun 02:13 2006
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Re: OT: Politics [Was:Social Contract]

On Wed, May 31, 2006 at 03:31:49PM -0500, Ron Johnson wrote:
> > The Queen may be "Head of state" but the person with power here is the
> > Prime Minister...  The Queen is just a figurehead...
> 
> Australian constitutional crisis of 1975.  Unelected Governor-
> General Sir John Kerr forced the elected PM out of office.

Australian governor-generals are chosen by the prime minister...
(including John Kerr), and can be dismissed by the prime minister. Yes,
we technically have a race condition at the top of our government.

(But finally! An off-topic debian-user politics thread on *Australia*)

Pasc

H.S. | 1 Jun 02:17 2006
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Re: how to detect if a jpeg file is progressive or not

Olafur Jens Sigurdsson wrote:

> Imagemagick does the trick for you.
> 
> To see if your files are interlaced or not you can use identify
> -verbose filename.jpg and search for the Interlace line and if it says
> None then it isnt a progressive jpeg and if it says Plane it is.

That was really great help. Thank a ton. The problem of identifying an
image as progressive or not is solved.

> 
> To convert from basic to progressive use convert infile.jpg -interlace
> Plane outfile.jpg

The problem left is to convert all my current jpegs into progressive
ones. jpegtran did the job (the following is one long command):
$> for f in *.jpg; do echo "$f"; mv "$f" tmp.jpg; jpegtran  -progressive
tmp.jpg  > "$f"; rm -f tmp.jpg; done

(I am sure there is a way to use the stdout and stdin in this procedure
instead of tmp.jpg, but I didn't check)

regards,
->HS

lmyho | 1 Jun 02:30 2006
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Change screen resolution

All,

I just installed debian on an older computer yesterday, but the screen resolution is
so poorly set, which is actually different from the resolution I have set during the
initial system configuration (much lower).  It looks really terrible and so
uncomfortable!:((

The screen can be set to much higher resolution (it was in a high resolution before
install debian).  But I can't find from where I can re-set the X windown resolution!
I have both gnome and kde installed, but no where I can find place to change the
resoluion!

Please anyone could tell me how can I change it?  the current too low resolution
just kills me.:((

All helps are highly appreciated.  Thanks!

Leo

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Christopher Nelson | 1 Jun 02:32 2006

Re: question

On Wed, May 31, 2006 at 10:11:56PM +0200, Matus C wrote:
> Hi,
> / when I am starting my pc I have always options between booting up 
> windows and kernel 2.6.7... , so I am sure it is kernel /

That's just the kernel used in the system.  The OS is still called
'Debian'

> >Could you type exactly what you see on the screen ?
> >Is it a white on black:
> 
> So, the screen is black and white.It looks like a MS-DOS 
> 
> >  Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 <hostname> tty 1
> 
> Yes, I checked it, there is exactly written Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 coma tty 1 

Standard console login screen.  nothing to worry about.

> / coma is root /

I'm not sure what you mean by this?  'coma' is the name of your box.

> There is also written coma login :
> I typed there matus / what is actaully ordinary user / and it asked me 
> for a password. After checkig password it waits, the coursor blinks.

Logged in.  Good.

> I typed there "dpkg --help" and I found that statement "dselect".
(Continue reading)

Dominique Brazziel | 1 Jun 02:30 2006
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Re: Is it OK to remove alsa-base after Kernel 2.6.8?

I have alsa as module in the kernel and selected
Crystal Logic CS46XX as the driver in the .config.  I
think it is OK, I purged 
alsa-base and alsa-utils but was able to play
streaming audio.  

I had read that Alsa was included in the 2.6.8 kernel
so 
I think this is OK to do.

Thanks. 

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Christopher Nelson | 1 Jun 02:47 2006

Re: Change screen resolution

On Wed, May 31, 2006 at 05:30:30PM -0700, lmyho wrote:
> 
> I just installed debian on an older computer yesterday, but the screen resolution is
> so poorly set, which is actually different from the resolution I have set during the
> initial system configuration (much lower).  It looks really terrible and so
> uncomfortable!:((
> 
> The screen can be set to much higher resolution (it was in a high resolution before
> install debian).  But I can't find from where I can re-set the X windown resolution!
> I have both gnome and kde installed, but no where I can find place to change the
> resoluion!
> 
> Please anyone could tell me how can I change it?  the current too low resolution
> just kills me.:((

sarge or etch/sid?  at any rate what does the output of 
'cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf |grep Modes' (sub XF86Config[-4] for sarge) say?  
Any of those lines have the resolution you want?  If so, do they all?

--

-- 
Christopher Nelson -- chris <at> cavein.org
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
The nice thing about standards is that there are so many of them to choose from.
		-- Andrew S. Tanenbaum

Roby | 1 Jun 02:52 2006
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Re: Change screen resolution

lmyho wrote:

> All,
> 
> I just installed debian on an older computer yesterday, but the screen
> resolution is so poorly set, which is actually different from the
> resolution I have set during the
> initial system configuration (much lower).  It looks really terrible and
> so uncomfortable!:((
> 
> The screen can be set to much higher resolution (it was in a high
> resolution before
> install debian).  But I can't find from where I can re-set the X windown
> resolution! I have both gnome and kde installed, but no where I can find
> place to change the resoluion!
> 
> Please anyone could tell me how can I change it?  the current too low
> resolution just kills me.:((
> 
> All helps are highly appreciated.  Thanks!
> 
> Leo
> 
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
> 
> 
>From the K Menu, select Control Center -> Peripherals -> Display.
(Continue reading)


Gmane