Brian Nelson | 1 May 01:08 2002

Re: strange behaviour in mail folder

Willy Sutrisno <sutrisno <at> singnet.com.sg> writes:

> hi,
> 
> Yesterday I was playing with my procmailrc, and spambouncer. Since then, I can
> not delete the mail in my mailbox (/var/spool/mail/sutrisno). The message at
> the bottom ot Mutt says: "Mailbox is read-only."
> 
> If I do:
> $ ls -l /var/spool/mail/sutrisno
> $ -rw-rw----    1 sutrisno mail     13239 Apr 30 11:24 /var/spool/mail/sutrisno
> 
> The only way to delete it is to "$ cat /dev/null > /var/spool/mail/sutrisno"
> 
> Anyone know what cause my mailbox to be read only? I have a feeling this one
> got to do with procmail and spambouncer.

I don't really recall how mbox locking works since I use maildir, but
perhaps there's a stale dotlock file sitting around.  It would be
named something like /var/mail/sutrisno.lock.  If it's there, try
removing it.

-- 
Brian Nelson <nelson <at> bignachos.com>

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Brian Nelson | 1 May 01:13 2002

Re: Newbie C programming question - OT

"Sean 'Shaleh' Perry" <shalehperry <at> attbi.com> writes:

> > 
> > Two questions:
> > 1. Is there a C programming tutor list that's recommended?
> 
> I have not seen any good C(++) mailing lists, there were news groups but i do
> not know if they still exist (comp.lang.*).

The comp.lang.* groups are still around and have plenty of
knowledgeable people actively participating.

For Linux C++ stuff, the mailing list
tuxcpprogramming <at> lists.linux.org.au is good, though it's a little quit
sometimes.  I'm not sure if there's a C one as well.

-- 
Brian Nelson <nelson <at> bignachos.com>

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csj | 1 May 01:23 2002
X-Face
Picon

Re: bootcdwrite is great

On Sat, 27 Apr 2002 19:38:32 -0500
Decibels <decibelshelp <at> charter.net> wrote:

> I haven't seen very much stuff about this on the net, but the debian 
> package 'bootcd' works really really well.
> 
> I created a 650M partition on my HD with X Windows (using Blackbox)
> and some tools like xfm, nano,... and was able to put it on a CD and
> actually boot to it and use it.
> 
> I have been playing around for awhile to create my own version of a 
> rescue CD with X support and this is the first attempt that actually
> worked.
> 
> Not sure on some things yet. Like first boot just got to console, and 
> saw a compaint about not being able to find the floppy, so just stuck
> a floopy in and next boot X came up just like normal when I boot the
> same system I made on the HD partition. It is a little slower using
> the CDROM though.
> 
> Will have to play with some stuff like fstab to make it always see my 
> other partitions after booting off CD so I can actually rescue them.
> Note, could probably just edit it in ram each time, but haven't tried
> that yet. From reading the notes, I think this is where the floppy
> actually take account for changes.
> 
> Just wanted to get it out there that this package actually works great
> on something that I have had no luck at before.

I agree. One thing I can't get it to do is to work with initrd stuff.
(Continue reading)

Corrin Lakeland | 1 May 01:15 2002
Picon

Re: chmod

> > And if anyone's in a 'splaining mood, here's another one: how do you set
> > all files so that the group permissions match the user permissions?
>
> This one is tougher, I think.  You could write
> such a utility pretty easily in C using the "stat()" function, but
> even though it's simple it seems like over kill. Gotta be a better
> way.

Doing it in C (untested code):

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
  struct stat * buf = (stat *) malloc(sizeof(stat));
  int retval;
  mode_t new_mode;
  mode_t to_add;

  if (argc != 2) exit(1);
  retval = stat(argv[1],buf);
  if (retval != 0) exit(1);

  new_mode = buf->st_mode;
/* NOTE: This gives the group >= permisions, change to suit */
  if (buf->st_mode & S_IRUSR) new_mode &= S_IRGRP;
  if (buf->st_mode & S_IWUSR) new_mode &= S_IWGRP;
  if (buf->st_mode & S_IXUSR) new_mode &= S_IXGRP;
(Continue reading)

W. Paul Mills | 1 May 01:16 2002

Re: Getting mozilla going...


Reboot! This is Linux, never reboot, except to install
new kernel. ;-)

Mozilla runs from a shell script. The variouse variables
are set by the script so mozilla can find all its parts.
Only programs run by the script will see those variables.
They go away when terminated.

Old netscape directories including ~your_home/.netscape/
can cause havoc with mozilla. Also make sure you start
mozilla from the intended shell script in it's original
location (and do not use links), otherwise mozilla gets
lost.

Paul

mlfasf <at> attbi.com (Mike Fontenot) writes:

> I just installed mozilla from potato.  When I first
> executed it (from my non-root login), it appeared
> to be setting MOZILLA_FIVE_HOME to /usr/lib/mozilla
> (as well as setting various other environmental
> variables).  But, even after a reboot, that variable
> isn't set, either under my non-root login, or under
> the root login.
>
> Anyone know what's going on?
>
> 	Mike Fontenot
(Continue reading)

Colin Watson | 1 May 01:32 2002
Picon

Re: chmod

On Wed, May 01, 2002 at 11:15:53AM +1200, Corrin Lakeland wrote:

[other people wrote:]

> > > And if anyone's in a 'splaining mood, here's another one: how do you set
> > > all files so that the group permissions match the user permissions?
> >
> > This one is tougher, I think.  You could write
> > such a utility pretty easily in C using the "stat()" function, but
> > even though it's simple it seems like over kill. Gotta be a better
> > way.
[...]
> Open invitation for any perl monk...

  perl -MFile::Find -e 'find (sub {
          return unless -f;
          my $mode = (stat)[2];
          $mode &= ~0060;
          $mode |= ($mode & 0600) >> 3;
          chmod $mode, $_;
  }, "/some/directory");'

At least, that's the most straightforward way that springs to mind,
although it certainly isn't the shortest. It deliberately doesn't touch
directories - remove the 'return unless -f;' line if you want that.

-- 
Colin Watson                                  [cjwatson <at> flatline.org.uk]

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(Continue reading)

dman | 1 May 01:43 2002
Picon

Re: random signatures in mutt

On Wed, May 01, 2002 at 07:11:33AM +1000, Sam Varghese wrote:
| How does one set random signatures in mutt after compilation? I
| looked up on Google and everything I found seems to indicate that it
| only be done by editing config.h during compilation.
| Is there some hack for this? I'm running version 1.3.28i on Woody.

If you like my sigs I'll send you my script.  It is run via this in
my .muttrc :

set signature="~/util/script/sig_gen.py|"

-D

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-- 

 "Piracy is not a technological issue. It's a behavior issue."   
                                                       --Steve Jobs

GnuPG key : http://dman.ddts.net/~dman/public_key.gpg

Tom Allison | 1 May 01:48 2002
Picon

uw-imap error

TRY CREATE - UID COPY failed

Can't append to mailbox, Trash. No such mailbox

i'm using the qmail Maildir format.
Any suggestions?
I'm thinking that somehow I'm not creating the correct directory when 
I run Moz.

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Karl E. Jorgensen | 1 May 01:40 2002

Re: What to ditch on small disk system?

On Tue, Apr 30, 2002 at 05:51:33PM -0500, Grant Edwards wrote:
> 
> I've got a stripped down Woody system that's currently using
> about 100MB of disk space.  What I've got now is the "base"
> package (no tasks selected) with a few packages added for
> specific requirements (ssh, webmin, dial-in-ppp).
> 
> It would be nice to trim it down some without losing too much
> functionality. Any opinions on these candidates for the ax?
> 
>  * /usr/share/locale 7MB
> 
>     I'd give the user an option to pick a locale, and then
>     whack all the rest.

Have a look at the "localepurge" package. Haven't tried it myself (yet)
though.

> 
>  * groff-base, manpages, man-db, /usr/share/doc, /usr/share/man  10-12MB
> 
>     This is intended as a runtime-only machine. Anybody doing
>     any sort of development or admin would be expected to have
>     a full-up system with all the man/doc stuff on it.

Add /usr/share/info to your list.

> 
>  * /usr/share/modconf  2MB
> 
(Continue reading)

Karl E. Jorgensen | 1 May 01:24 2002

Re: chmod

On Tue, Apr 30, 2002 at 04:37:09PM -0600, Gary Hennigan wrote:
>
> [snip previous issue]
> 
> Well, in Unix you typically string a bunch of simple tools together to
> accomplish complex tasks. You almost had it with your "ls" solution,
> but try "find" instead, and use xargs. Here's how I do what you're
> trying to accomplish:
> 
>         find <dirname> -depth -type d -print|xargs chmod 770
> 
> > And if anyone's in a 'splaining mood, here's another one: how do you set all
> > files so that the group permissions match the user permissions?  (If you have
> > three files who's permissions are, for example, 700, 600, 500, and you want
> > them to be 770, 660, 550 respectively.)
> 
> This one is tougher, I think. I'd write a script to do it. Maybe
> someone has a brighter idea. The complication here is that there's not
> a good shell command, or unix utility, to simply report the mode of a
> file in numerical form, at least that I'm aware of. You could write
> such a utility pretty easily in C using the "stat()" function, but
> even though it's simple it seems like over kill. Gotta be a better
> way.

No script needed, thanks to the forethought of the authors of chmod:

find <dirname> -type f -print0 | xargs -0 chmod g=u,o=

--

-- 
Karl E. Jørgensen
(Continue reading)


Gmane