Daniel Burton | 1 Nov 01:14 2003

www.debian.org: Mailing list search engine can't search for numbers

Package: www.debian.org
Severity: normal

Trying to search the boot list for "2.6.0", I get the following errors:

Mailing List Archive Search Results

      Error:
      glimpse: pattern '2.6.0' has no characters that were indexed: glimpse cannot search for it (to search for
numbers, make the index using 'glimpseindex -n ...')

      Exit code 1 

No matches.

Back to: Debian Project homepage || Mailing Lists Archives search
Debugging information (please ignore):
I got passed

    * query
          o 2.6.0 
    * lists
          o boot 
    * errors
          o 0 
    * maxfiles
          o 25 
    * maxlines
          o 10 

(Continue reading)

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Alexander Winston | 2 Nov 05:42 2003
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Proofreading From a Native English Speaker

Hello. It has come to my attention that you have requested English
proofreading from native English speakers. While I have not looked over
the Web site in great detail yet, a large error I have noticed that
punctuation always seems to be missing from inside quotations. For
example, I spotted this:

no browser specific "extensions".

In this case, it should read thusly:

no browser-specific "extensions."

The problem seems to be fairly widespread. Sorry I can't be of more help
at the moment, but I hope to commit myself more in the near future.

PS: I recommend purchasing a copy of the Chicago Manual of Style, a tome
that explains in great detail how to efficiently and effectively use the
English language correctly. Widely regarded as one of the best of its
kind, it is an absolutely spectacular resource for writers and editors
alike.
Koppány Gordos | 2 Nov 11:32 2003
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Frank Lichtenheld | 2 Nov 18:25 2003
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Naming schemes of DDP documents

Hi.

While checking links on www.debian.org I spotted a problem
with the DDP documents listed on www.debian.org/doc. There
exist at least to naming schemes for languages with a "sublanguage"
(like pt_BR and zh_TW):

1.) xx-xx for all formats
	(i.e. <manual>.pt-br.{html,ps,pdf,txt})
2.) xx-xx for html and xx_XX for all other formats 
	(i.e. <manual>.pt-br.html but <manual>.pt_BR.{txt,ps,pdf})

This causes some dead links on www.debian.org.
I wonder on which site this should be fixed? There are three possibilities:

1.) use naming scheme 1 for all documents and file bugs against
non-conforming ones
2.) dito, but use scheme 2
3.) let support www.debian.org/doc/ support both schemes
			
Which one is it? (I can take care myself of 3 or file the bugs related 
to 1 or 2)

Gruesse,
--

-- 
Frank Lichtenheld <frank <at> lichtenheld.de>
www: http://www.djpig.de/
Osamu Aoki | 2 Nov 18:19 2003
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Re: Naming schemes of DDP documents

On Sun, Nov 02, 2003 at 06:25:28PM +0100, Frank Lichtenheld wrote:
> Hi.
> 
> While checking links on www.debian.org I spotted a problem
> with the DDP documents listed on www.debian.org/doc. There
> exist at least to naming schemes for languages with a "sublanguage"
> (like pt_BR and zh_TW):
> 
> 1.) xx-xx for all formats
> 	(i.e. <manual>.pt-br.{html,ps,pdf,txt})
> 2.) xx-xx for html and xx_XX for all other formats 
> 	(i.e. <manual>.pt-br.html but <manual>.pt_BR.{txt,ps,pdf})
> 
> This causes some dead links on www.debian.org.
> I wonder on which site this should be fixed? There are three possibilities:

Old discussion which we have no solid conclusion/

> 1.) use naming scheme 1 for all documents and file bugs against
> non-conforming ones
> 2.) dito, but use scheme 2
> 3.) let support www.debian.org/doc/ support both schemes
> 			
> Which one is it? (I can take care myself of 3 or file the bugs related 
> to 1 or 2)
> 
> Gruesse,

We need to agree not just these but many more for consistency.

I like 1) but if 2) is chosen, we may do like
  <manual>.pt_BR.ISO-8859-1.{txt,ps,pdf}
   or
  <manual>.pt_BR.UTF-8.{txt,ps,pdf}

I think FreeBSD did so.

Anyway, come visit:

 http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/ddp-policy/ddp-policy.en.html
  and see
 http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/ddp-policy/

Osamu

Frank Lichtenheld | 2 Nov 20:30 2003
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Re: Naming schemes of DDP documents

On Sun, Nov 02, 2003 at 06:19:17PM +0100, Osamu Aoki wrote:
> On Sun, Nov 02, 2003 at 06:25:28PM +0100, Frank Lichtenheld wrote:
> > [...]
> > 1.) use naming scheme 1 for all documents and file bugs against
> > non-conforming ones
> > 2.) dito, but use scheme 2
> > 3.) let support www.debian.org/doc/ support both schemes
> > 			
> > Which one is it? (I can take care myself of 3 or file the bugs related 
> > to 1 or 2)
> 
> We need to agree not just these but many more for consistency.
> 
> I like 1) but if 2) is chosen, we may do like
>   <manual>.pt_BR.ISO-8859-1.{txt,ps,pdf}
>    or
>   <manual>.pt_BR.UTF-8.{txt,ps,pdf}
> [...] 
>  http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/ddp-policy/ddp-policy.en.html
>   and see
>  http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/ddp-policy/

Ok, if I interpret your mail (and the ddp policy draft )correctly 
the answer is actually
"I like 1, and that also what's in the ddp-policy draft. But
bug reports are not quite good, because there is no consensus yet
and the policy is still a draft". Correct me if I got anything
wrong.

Based on this I will propose a patch for the www pages which enables
them to support both naming schemes. This will at least give the users 
correct links...

Gruesse,
--

-- 
Frank Lichtenheld <frank <at> lichtenheld.de>
www: http://www.djpig.de/
Joey Hess | 2 Nov 22:23 2003
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Re: Proofreading From a Native English Speaker

Alexander Winston wrote:
> Hello. It has come to my attention that you have requested English
> proofreading from native English speakers. While I have not looked over
> the Web site in great detail yet, a large error I have noticed that
> punctuation always seems to be missing from inside quotations. For
> example, I spotted this:
> 
> no browser specific "extensions".
> 
> In this case, it should read thusly:
> 
> no browser-specific "extensions."

This is common usage amoung technically inclined, to whom the exact
content of the quotation, right down to the punctuation, is often 
very important.

--

-- 
see shy jo
Alexander Winston | 3 Nov 00:29 2003
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Re: Proofreading From a Native English Speaker

On Sun, 2003-11-02 at 16:23, Joey Hess wrote:
> Alexander Winston wrote:
> > Hello. It has come to my attention that you have requested English
> > proofreading from native English speakers. While I have not looked over
> > the Web site in great detail yet, a large error I have noticed that
> > punctuation always seems to be missing from inside quotations. For
> > example, I spotted this:
> > 
> > no browser specific "extensions".
> > 
> > In this case, it should read thusly:
> > 
> > no browser-specific "extensions."
> 
> This is common usage amoung technically inclined, to whom the exact
> content of the quotation, right down to the punctuation, is often 
> very important.

Regardless of how commonplace this usage is, it should not be accepted.
Of course there are situations where punctuation exists in the original,
but such predicaments can be explained away with a miniscule note from
the editor without sacrificing the quality and the intended message.
Colin Watson | 3 Nov 01:13 2003
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Re: Proofreading From a Native English Speaker

[Apologies if you didn't want a private copy of this mail; I haven't
worked out whether you read this mailing list.]

On Sun, Nov 02, 2003 at 06:29:28PM -0500, Alexander Winston wrote:
> On Sun, 2003-11-02 at 16:23, Joey Hess wrote:
> > Alexander Winston wrote:
> > > Hello. It has come to my attention that you have requested English
> > > proofreading from native English speakers. While I have not looked over
> > > the Web site in great detail yet, a large error I have noticed that
> > > punctuation always seems to be missing from inside quotations. For
> > > example, I spotted this:
> > > 
> > > no browser specific "extensions".
> > > 
> > > In this case, it should read thusly:
> > > 
> > > no browser-specific "extensions."
> > 
> > This is common usage amoung technically inclined, to whom the exact
> > content of the quotation, right down to the punctuation, is often 
> > very important.
> 
> Regardless of how commonplace this usage is, it should not be accepted.
> Of course there are situations where punctuation exists in the original,
> but such predicaments can be explained away with a miniscule note from
> the editor without sacrificing the quality and the intended message.

This is a disputed point of punctuation - in particular, standard modern
British English and American English usages differ - so "should not be
accepted" is too strong a statement. The style used on the Debian web
site is known as "logical quoting". Sources cite the "Oxford Dictionary
for Writers and Editors" as support, among others.

I understand that the American style, with punctuation within quotations
marks, originated as a point of typography to make it easier to kern
combinations of quotation marks, commas, and full stops, not as a point
of grammatical correctness. Modern typography is better, which is
perhaps why logical quoting is regaining acceptance.

Given the disagreement among style manuals (which is not an uncommon
occurrence anyway), I say go for the style that actually makes good
sense, namely quoting what you mean to quote. When the punctuation is
part of the quoted phrase, quote it; when it isn't, don't.

Cheers,

--

-- 
Colin Watson                                  [cjwatson <at> flatline.org.uk]


Gmane