pj | 1 Jun 08:06 2011
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How to silence yasr ?

Greetings,

I can silence yasr from the keyboard:
  alt-enter  Disable yasr. Yasr is silent and ignores all keys when
             disabled. Press again to re-enable. Note: this key
             is defined in the [options] section as "DisableKey" 

But supposing I have a program which does its own talking,
is there a way it can silence yasr programatically ?

(I.e. corresponding to
  echo 7 > /sys/accessibility/speakup/silent
 in speakup ?
)

Regards,  Peter Billam

http://www.pjb.com.au       pj <at> pjb.com.au      (03) 6278 9410
"Was der Meister nicht kann,   vermöcht es der Knabe, hätt er
 ihm immer gehorcht?"   Siegfried to Mime, from Act 1 Scene 2

Jason White | 1 Jun 08:16 2011
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Re: How to silence yasr ?

pj <at> pjb.com.au <pj <at> pjb.com.au> wrote:

> But supposing I have a program which does its own talking,
> is there a way it can silence yasr programatically ?
> 
> (I.e. corresponding to
>   echo 7 > /sys/accessibility/speakup/silent
>  in speakup ?
> )

No. I think you'll have to use Speakup for that, unless you try something
rather complicated by attempting to simulate a key press/release somehow.

Trevor Saunders | 1 Jun 09:24 2011
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Re: How to silence yasr ?

On Wed, Jun 01, 2011 at 04:16:24PM +1000, Jason White wrote:
> pj <at> pjb.com.au <pj <at> pjb.com.au> wrote:
>  
> > But supposing I have a program which does its own talking,
> > is there a way it can silence yasr programatically ?
> > 
> > (I.e. corresponding to
> >   echo 7 > /sys/accessibility/speakup/silent
> >  in speakup ?
> > )
> 
> No. I think you'll have to use Speakup for that, unless you try something
> rather complicated by attempting to simulate a key press/release somehow.

imho doing this isn't a particularly good idea, because it seems
some what rude to reach into the users screen reader config and change it
without  them asking for it, and it seems like a sub optimal design for
$application to know about all the screen readers out there and have
special code to try and make each of them be quiet.

Trev

> 
> 
> -- 
> To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-accessibility-REQUEST <at> lists.debian.org
> with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster <at> lists.debian.org
> Archive: http://lists.debian.org/20110601061624.GA19617 <at> jdc.jasonjgw.net
> 
(Continue reading)

Jason White | 1 Jun 09:33 2011
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Re: How to silence yasr ?

Trevor Saunders <trev.saunders <at> gmail.com> wrote:

> imho doing this isn't a particularly good idea, because it seems
> some what rude to reach into the users screen reader config and change it
> without  them asking for it, and it seems like a sub optimal design for
> $application to know about all the screen readers out there and have
> special code to try and make each of them be quiet.

I agree entirely; I wouldn't even consider using any such technique in any
application or script that could have a life outside my own personal
environment.

That's how strongly I agree with the above.

mattias | 1 Jun 10:04 2011
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Live media

Any blidn user using it?

pj | 1 Jun 11:46 2011
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Re: How to silence yasr ?

Trevor Saunders wrote:
> imho doing this isn't a particularly good idea,

emacspeak, for example, is self-speaking and it works
much more fluently than raw emacs plus a screen-reader.
My particular case is my Perl CPAN module
  http://search.cpan.org/perldoc?Term::Clui
which allows choice between a number of strings using arrow
keys and return. The highlit choice is in reverse video, and
therefore yasr users can't tell which it is. Also, when the
highlight moves following an arrow-key or tab, Term::Clui has
to rewrite both the previous no-longer-highlit item and the new
highlit item; so both get spoken, which is unhelpful to the user.

There's also the case dealt with by my little wrapper
  http://www.pjb.com.au/blin/free/quiet
which can be used for noisy programs like wget or mplayer
to automate the necessary switching-off and -on.

> it seems somewhat rude to reach into the users screen
> reader config and change it without them asking for it,

Agreed, definitely; it's not a config-change. It's a real-time
need, just like sending "\e[7m" to /dev/tty to go reverse-video.

> it seems like a sub optimal design for $application to
> know about all the screen readers out there and have
> special code to try and make each of them be quiet.

AIUI speakup and yasr are the important ones; I think e.g. the
(Continue reading)

Mario Lang | 1 Jun 11:52 2011

Re: Live media

"mattias" <mj <at> mjw.se> writes:

> Any blidn user using it?

Using what?  Please increase your verbosity level :-)

--

-- 
CYa,
  ⡍⠁⠗⠊⠕

Jason White | 1 Jun 12:28 2011
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Re: How to silence yasr ?

pj <at> pjb.com.au <pj <at> pjb.com.au> wrote:

> Agreed, definitely; it's not a config-change. It's a real-time
> need, just like sending "\e[7m" to /dev/tty to go reverse-video.

I think that's rather different from turning off the screen reader, though,
and it's the kind of need that Speech-Dispatcher was designed to meet, if I
remember rightly, by allowing multiple speech applications to coexist without
interfering with each other.

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Espeakup-squeeze installer

Greetings,

I'm trying to use the Espeakup-squeeze installer on my laptop 
which doesn't have an interface which agrees with my braille 
display. The installer speaks allright, but far to fast for me 
who never uses speech if I can avoid it. How can I reduce the 
speech rate?

Bertil

Halim Sahin | 3 Jun 11:38 2011
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How tu run at-spi-registryd in lxde?

Hi,

Which is the prefered way to run the at-spi-registryd in lxde?
My dirty hacks didn't work here :-(.
The daemon was started but lx* apps were not accessible.
restarting lxpanel helps but I don't want to restart core applications
of the running desktop.
I tried starting it in startlxde script and with a custom xinitrc file.

My system is a debian squeeze.i
Any Ideas?
Thx.
Halim


Gmane