Arnoud Engelfriet | 7 Jun 09:00 2007
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How to apply the GPL without violating it

By request I'm forwarding this message from 
Gennaro Prota <gennaro.prota <at> yahoo.com>

Hi guys,

I've a hopefully simple question for you all: what is the *minimal*
required text for applying the GNU GPL to a given work? I'm a bit
confused: paragraph 0 of the normative part of the license says the
license "applies to any program or other work which contains a notice
placed by the copyright holder saying it may be distributed under the
terms of this General Public License.". That's very simple, but
doesn't look completely correct to me, as it only refers to
*distribution*. It seems that, at least, it should be generalized to
something like:

  Licensed under the GNU GPL.

(instead of "distributable under" or "distributed under").

So far so good. But the non-normative part ("How to Apply These Terms
to Your New Programs"), complicates things a bit:

  To do so, attach the following notices [note the plural!]
  to the program.

  It is safest to attach them to the start of each source file
  to most effectively convey the exclusion of warranty;
  [so, this is safest, but not required, right?]

  and each file should have at least the "copyright" line and
(Continue reading)

Thomas Charron | 7 Jun 15:29 2007
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Re: How to apply the GPL without violating it

On 6/7/07, Arnoud Engelfriet <arnoud <at> engelfriet.net> wrote:
> By request I'm forwarding this message from
> Gennaro Prota <gennaro.prota <at> yahoo.com>
> Hi guys,
> I've a hopefully simple question for you all: what is the *minimal*
> required text for applying the GNU GPL to a given work? I'm a bit
> So far so good. But the non-normative part ("How to Apply These Terms
> to Your New Programs"), complicates things a bit:
>   To do so, attach the following notices [note the plural!]
>   to the program.
>   It is safest to attach them to the start of each source file
>   to most effectively convey the exclusion of warranty;
>   [so, this is safest, but not required, right?]
> In practice my question boils down to this: if my source files stick
> to the following text:
>    Copyright year(s) <my name>
>    Licensed under the GNU General Public License Version 2
> is that enough? Is the second sentence to be considered a "pointer to
> the full notice"? If that is of any help, the text I'm currently using
> can be seen here:

  What you intend to do is perfectly ok.  Even NO license being
specified at all could still be used, but is not advised.  Just
because something doesn't have a license inline doesn't mean it
doesn't belong to someone else and must be licensed.  You may want to
also include the URL of the GPL at
http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html

--

-- 
-- Thomas
(Continue reading)

David A. Desrosiers | 7 Jun 23:08 2007
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Re: How to apply the GPL without violating it

On Thu, 2007-06-07 at 09:29 -0400, Thomas Charron wrote:
> Just because something doesn't have a license inline doesn't mean it
> doesn't belong to someone else and must be licensed.  You may want to
> also include the URL of the GPL at
> http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html 

Don't forget to include the actual text of the GPL in the "COPYING"
file, as required by the license. Failure to include the human-readible
text of the GPL in your distribution voids the coverage of the GPL with
that distribution. 

Christine Thompson | 5 Jun 15:58 2007
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Wanadoo Livebox ADSL Router (OEM Inventel)

Hi
have just found a very old post regarding wanadoo livebox and it being
locked to wanadoo.
can I enquire as to whether anyone has ever discovered an unlocking code for
these as I am trying to use my livebox to connect to BT total.

regards
christine thompson


Gmane