Tom Taylor | 1 Jan 17:43 2011
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Re: CPE Prefix Sub-Delegation on LAN

Sorry to be a little late on this. Just regarding your final point, RFC
5969 provides a DHCPv4 option for configuration of the 6rd CE, including
the prefix.

On 22/12/2010 1:27 PM, Guillaume.Leclanche@... wrote:
>> -----Original Message----- From: Fred Baker
>> [mailto:fred@...] Sent: Wednesday, December 22, 2010 6:12 PM
>>
...
>
> There might be some work to do to say how the dhcpv6 server in the
> CPE should get the prefix received from the ISP, also when the ISP is
> not using DHCPv6. For example, with 6rd. However, since the 6rd
> parameters have to be pre-provisioned or given via DHCP(v4), I can
> imagine that there's a way to sort this out without too much pain.
>
> Guillaume _______________________________________________ v6ops
> mailing list v6ops@...
> https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/v6ops
>
>
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Jess Ger | 2 Jan 16:35 2011
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unscribe from the email list

Hi

please unscribe my email from the email list

Jess


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Joel Jaeggli | 2 Jan 16:46 2011

Re: unscribe from the email list

Each message sent to the v6ops mailing list contains the following url.

https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/v6ops

which you may use to unsubcribe.

On 1/2/11 7:35 AM, Jess Ger wrote:
> Hi
> 
> please unscribe my email from the email list
> 
> Jess
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> v6ops mailing list
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> https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/v6ops

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Ed Jankiewicz | 3 Jan 17:50 2011

A good "state of the art" overview of IPv6 Transition from FCC

Excellent survey article with a realistic view of the motivations for 
IPv6 and the downside of the delay in implementation.

http://www.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2010/db1230/DOC-303870A1.pdf

--

-- 
Ed Jankiewicz - SRI International
Fort Monmouth Branch Office - IPv6 Research
Supporting DISA Standards Engineering Branch
732-389-1003 or  ed.jankiewicz@...

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Internet | 3 Jan 19:00 2011
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I-D Action:draft-ietf-v6ops-3177bis-end-sites-01.txt

A New Internet-Draft is available from the on-line Internet-Drafts directories.
This draft is a work item of the IPv6 Operations Working Group of the IETF.

	Title           : IPv6 Address Assignment to End Sites
	Author(s)       : T. Narten, et al.
	Filename        : draft-ietf-v6ops-3177bis-end-sites-01.txt
	Pages           : 10
	Date            : 2011-01-03

RFC 3177 argued that in IPv6, end sites should be assigned /48 blocks
in most cases. The Regional Internet Registries (RIRs) adopted that
recommendation in 2002, but began reconsidering the policy in 2005.
This document obsoletes the RFC 3177 recommendations on the
assignment of IPv6 address space to end sites.  The exact choice of
how much address space to assign end sites is an issue for the
operational community. The IETF's role in this case is limited to
providing guidance on IPv6 architectural and operational
considerations. This document reviews the architectural and
operational considerations of end site assignments as well as the
motivations behind the original 3177 recommendations. Moreover, the
document clarifies that a one-size-fits-all recommendation of /48 is
not nuanced enough for the broad range of end sites and is no longer
recommended as a single default.

This document obsoletes RFC 3177.
Contents

A URL for this Internet-Draft is:
http://www.ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-ietf-v6ops-3177bis-end-sites-01.txt

Internet-Drafts are also available by anonymous FTP at:
ftp://ftp.ietf.org/internet-drafts/

Below is the data which will enable a MIME compliant mail reader
implementation to automatically retrieve the ASCII version of the
Internet-Draft.
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Randy Bush | 4 Jan 00:35 2011

Re: A good "state of the art" overview of IPv6 Transition from FCC

> http://www.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2010/db1230/DOC-303870A1.pdf

"The Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) developed in the late 1970s has
the capacity for about 4 billion unique addresses. It would have been
hard to imagine in the 1970s that 4 billion addresses were not going to
be enough. But by the early 1990s, Internet engineers recognized that
the supply of addresses was relatively limited compared to likely
demand, and they set to work designing a successor to IPv4. They
developed a new Internet Protocol, IPv6, with a vastly increased address
space: 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses."

it should have added " It would have been hard to imagine in the 1990s
that 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses were not going to be
enough."

i wish i could remember the quote and attribution that no fixed address
size has ever been enough.

randy
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Olivier MJ Crepin-Leblond | 4 Jan 01:04 2011

Re: A good "state of the art" overview of IPv6 Transition from FCC


On 04/01/2011 00:35, Randy Bush wrote :
> i wish i could remember the quote and attribution that no fixed address
> size has ever been enough.
>

So Internet addressing is a gas: it will diffuse readily, spreading
apart in order to uniformly fill the space of any container. :-)

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Randy Bush | 4 Jan 01:06 2011

Re: A good "state of the art" overview of IPv6 Transition from FCC

>> i wish i could remember the quote and attribution that no fixed address
>> size has ever been enough.
> So Internet addressing is a gas: it will diffuse readily, spreading
> apart in order to uniformly fill the space of any container. :-)

and the /32s the rirs are allocating to anything that walks are pretty
big molecules

randy
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Joel Jaeggli | 4 Jan 02:08 2011

Re: A good "state of the art" overview of IPv6 Transition from FCC

On 1/3/11 3:35 PM, Randy Bush wrote:
>> http://www.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2010/db1230/DOC-303870A1.pdf
> 
> "The Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) developed in the late 1970s has
> the capacity for about 4 billion unique addresses. It would have been
> hard to imagine in the 1970s that 4 billion addresses were not going to
> be enough. But by the early 1990s, Internet engineers recognized that
> the supply of addresses was relatively limited compared to likely
> demand, and they set to work designing a successor to IPv4. They
> developed a new Internet Protocol, IPv6, with a vastly increased address
> space: 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses."
> 
> it should have added " It would have been hard to imagine in the 1990s
> that 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses were not going to be
> enough."
> 
> i wish i could remember the quote and attribution that no fixed address
> size has ever been enough.

There's ~10^80 atoms in the observable universe...

some constraints are harder than others to work around.

I'm pretty confident that by the time I'm the age you are now that we
will have had to do something else, 1982 was a while ago.

> randy
> _______________________________________________
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> https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/v6ops
> 

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Ed Jankiewicz | 4 Jan 04:31 2011

Re: A good "state of the art" overview of IPv6 Transition from FCC

right up there with:

"I think there is a world market for maybe 5 computers"  Thomas Watson, 
Chair IBM, 1943
"There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home"  Ken 
Olsen, Chairman and founder Digital, 1977
"We don't like their sound, and guitar groups are going out" Decca 
Records, rejecting the Beatles in 1962
"640K should be more than enough for anybody" Bill Gates, 1981

what is the old quote about "never been a weapon built that hasn't been 
used"?  or the generalization of Parkinson's law:

"The demand upon a resource tends to expand as much as the supply of the 
resource"

We can only hope that 340 trillion trillion trillion is enough for a 
while...

On 1/3/2011 6:35 PM, Randy Bush wrote:
>> http://www.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2010/db1230/DOC-303870A1.pdf
> "The Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) developed in the late 1970s has
> the capacity for about 4 billion unique addresses. It would have been
> hard to imagine in the 1970s that 4 billion addresses were not going to
> be enough. But by the early 1990s, Internet engineers recognized that
> the supply of addresses was relatively limited compared to likely
> demand, and they set to work designing a successor to IPv4. They
> developed a new Internet Protocol, IPv6, with a vastly increased address
> space: 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses."
>
> it should have added " It would have been hard to imagine in the 1990s
> that 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses were not going to be
> enough."
>
> i wish i could remember the quote and attribution that no fixed address
> size has ever been enough.
>
> randy

--

-- 
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Fort Monmouth Branch Office - IPv6 Research
Supporting DISA Standards Engineering Branch
732-389-1003 or  ed.jankiewicz@...

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Gmane