Internet-Drafts | 2 Oct 16:50 2003
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I-D ACTION:draft-ietf-pim-sm-v2-new-08.txt,.ps

A New Internet-Draft is available from the on-line Internet-Drafts directories.
This draft is a work item of the Protocol Independent Multicast Working Group of the IETF.

	Title		: Protocol Independent Multicast - Sparse Mode PIM-SM): 
                          Protocol Specification (Revised)
	Author(s)	: B. Fenner, M. Handley, H. Holbrook, I. Kouvelas
	Filename	: draft-ietf-pim-sm-v2-new-08.txt,.ps
	Pages		: 143
	Date		: 2003-10-2
	
This document specifies Protocol Independent Multicast -
Sparse Mode (PIM-SM).  PIM-SM is a multicast routing protocol
that can use the underlying unicast routing information base
or a separate multicast-capable routing information base.  It
builds unidirectional shared trees rooted at a Rendezvous
Point (RP) per group, and optionally creates shortest-path
trees per source.

A URL for this Internet-Draft is:
http://www.ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-ietf-pim-sm-v2-new-08.txt

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Singh, Gurpreet | 6 Oct 20:03 2003

PIM Group Set Source List Rules

Hi

I have a question regarding the group source list rules for PIM Join/Prune
messages defined in the draft draft-ietf-pim-sm-v2-new-07.txt  Section
4.10.5.1 

The table listing the cobination of Join and Prunes in a single Join/Prune
message has "no" and "?"

no   Combination is not allowed by the protocol and MUST NOT be
     generated by a router.

?    Combination not expected by the protocol, but well-defined. A
     router MAY accept it but SHOULD NOT generate it.

Is it correct to infer from this that for combinations marked as "no" router
should not accept the PIM-SM Join/Prune message and just drop the message if
it receives a PIM-SM Join/Prune message with the "no" combination ? Or is it
that the behaviour for accepting or droping this kind of packet is not
defined in the spec and is left to the deiscretion of the implementation.
But if that is the case then "no" and "?" would be similar in behaviour.

Thanks

Gurpreet
John Zwiebel | 6 Oct 21:40 2003

Re: PIM Group Set Source List Rules


On Monday, October 6, 2003, at 11:03 AM, Singh, Gurpreet wrote:

> Hi
>
>
> I have a question regarding the group source list rules for PIM 
> Join/Prune
> messages defined in the draft draft-ietf-pim-sm-v2-new-07.txt  Section
> 4.10.5.1
>
> The table listing the cobination of Join and Prunes in a single 
> Join/Prune
> message has "no" and "?"
>
> no   Combination is not allowed by the protocol and MUST NOT be
>      generated by a router.
>
>
> ?    Combination not expected by the protocol, but well-defined. A
>      router MAY accept it but SHOULD NOT generate it.
>
>
> Is it correct to infer from this that for combinations marked as "no" 
> router
> should not accept the PIM-SM Join/Prune message and just drop the 
> message if
> it receives a PIM-SM Join/Prune message with the "no" combination ? Or 
> is it
> that the behaviour for accepting or droping this kind of packet is not
(Continue reading)

Rabindranath Das | 9 Oct 14:22 2003

What is the difference between RPF Neighbor and RPF' Neighbor

PIM DM Draft is not very clear about the differences between RPF neighbor and RPF' neighbor.
What I understood is, for a DUT any neighbor on the same LAN as the RFF interface
(of a DUT for a particular source S) is called RPF Neighbor; but when DUT's routing
table is concerned to reach source S then the routing table will recommend one of the
RPF neighbor as the next hop or the gateway. That is probably the RPF' neighbor.
 
Please let me know if I am making any mistake.
 
--Rabin
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John Zwiebel | 9 Oct 19:50 2003

Re: What is the difference between RPF Neighbor and RPF' Neighbor

RPF neighbor is the one the IGP points to as the next-hop toward the 
source
RPF' neighbor is the one that is actually used and it may be set by an 
assert
	for instance.

The idea that all routers on that lan are RPF neighbors isn't quite 
right.

On Thursday, October 9, 2003, at 05:22 AM, Rabindranath Das wrote:

>
> PIM DM Draft is not very clear about the differences between RPF 
> neighbor and RPF' neighbor.
> What I understood is, for a DUT any neighbor on the same LAN as the 
> RFF interface
> (of a DUT for a particular source S) is called RPF Neighbor; but when 
> DUT's routing
> table is concerned to reach source S then the routing table will 
> recommend one of the
> RPF neighbor as the next hop or the gateway. That is probably the RPF' 
> neighbor.
>  
> Please let me know if I am making any mistake.
>  
> --Rabin
> _______________________________________________
> pim mailing list
> pim <at> catarina.usc.edu
> http://catarina.usc.edu/mailman/listinfo/pim
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Prashant Jhingran | 13 Oct 11:13 2003

RE: What is the difference between RPF Neighbor and RPF' Neighbor

Hi,
            As per the draft:

neighbor RPF'(S,G) {
  if ( I_Am_Assert_loser(S, G, RPF_interface(S) )) {
    return AssertWinner(S, G, RPF_interface(S) )
  } else {
    return MRIB.next_hop( S )
  }
}

while the RPF nbr is simply "MRIB.next_hop( S )" .

Now  "MRIB.next_hop( S )" cannot yield  "any neighbor on the same LAN as the
RFF interface" as it  is dependant on routing database MRIB.

regards,
Prashant

-----Original Message-----
From: pim-bounces <at> catarina.usc.edu [mailto:pim-bounces <at> catarina.usc.edu]On
Behalf Of John Zwiebel
Sent: Thursday, October 09, 2003 11:20 PM
To: Rabindranath Das
Cc: pim <at> catarina.usc.edu; pim-request <at> catarina.usc.edu; John Zwiebel
Subject: Re: [pim] What is the difference between RPF Neighbor and RPF'
Neighbor

RPF neighbor is the one the IGP points to as the next-hop toward the source
RPF' neighbor is the one that is actually used and it may be set by an
assert
for instance.

The idea that all routers on that lan are RPF neighbors isn't quite right.

On Thursday, October 9, 2003, at 05:22 AM, Rabindranath Das wrote:

PIM DM Draft is not very clear about the differences between RPF neighbor
and RPF' neighbor.
What I understood is, for a DUT any neighbor on the same LAN as the RFF
interface
(of a DUT for a particular source S) is called RPF Neighbor; but when DUT's
routing
table is concerned to reach source S then the routing table will recommend
one of the
RPF neighbor as the next hop or the gateway. That is probably the RPF'
neighbor.

Please let me know if I am making any mistake.

--Rabin
_______________________________________________
pim mailing list
pim <at> catarina.usc.edu
http://catarina.usc.edu/mailman/listinfo/pim
venkat bijjam | 10 Oct 06:09 2003
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Request from a PIMSM developer

Respected M/s,

Could you suggest me the PIM-SM RFC2362's Postscript version?

Thank you for your kind support.

Regards,
Bijjam
Pavlin Radoslavov | 13 Oct 18:04 2003

Re: Request from a PIMSM developer

> Could you suggest me the PIM-SM RFC2362's Postscript version?

Bijjam,

You should use the lastest Internet Draft instead of RFC-2362:

http://www.ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-ietf-pim-sm-v2-new-08.ps
http://www.ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-ietf-pim-sm-v2-new-08.txt

Regards,
Pavlin
Jim T | 13 Oct 22:02 2003
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Question on (S,G,rpt) prune state

Hi,
 
I'm new to PIM and have been going through the PIM-SM draft (v7). I had a couple of (possibly newbie) questions and hope someone will answer.
 
a) Can (S,G) and (S,G,rpt) states exist at the same time on a router? I think not because the former is on the SPT while the latter is meant for prune state on the RPT. But I'm a bit confused by the description in section 4.1.5.
 
b) This is touching upon implementation but I'm asking it to understand the whole thing better. When a (S,G,rpt) Prune is received, would a router actually create a "(S,G) style forwarding entry" which would have its olist set to that the olist of the (*,G) state minus the interface on which (S,G,rpt) Prune is received?
 
Thanks much,
Jim
 

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John Zwiebel | 13 Oct 23:40 2003

Re: Question on (S,G,rpt) prune state


On Monday, October 13, 2003, at 01:02 PM, Jim T wrote:

> a) Can (S,G) and (S,G,rpt) states exist at the same time on a router?

No

> b) This is touching upon implementation but I'm asking it to 
> understand the whole thing better. When a (S,G,rpt) Prune is received, 
> would a router actually create a "(S,G) style forwarding entry" which 
> would have its olist set to that the olist of the (*,G) state minus 
> the interface on which (S,G,rpt) Prune is received?

yes, remember to keep the rp-bit set for the entry and that the
RPF is still toward the RP not the source

Gmane